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al kaeda in NIGERIA.....boko haram (i.e. western education is forbidden) violence

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HannaTheCrusader

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BBC

Barely 24 hours after bombs went off in Maiduguri and Damaturu respectively, gunmen late Thursday attacked a church in Gombe killing at least six people, the church's pastor says.

Johnson Jauro said the killings took place when gunmen burst into his Deeper Life Church in the capital of Gombe state.

He said his wife was among those killed. Ten other people were injured.

The nation has recently experienced a surge in ethnic and sectarian violence. Only recently President Goodluck Jonathan declared a state of emergency in a number of local government areas in four states of the country.

"The attackers started shooting sporadically. They shot through the window of the church, and many people were killed including my wife," Jauro told Reuters news agency.

"Many members who attended the church service were also injured."

No group said it carried out the attack, but the Islamist group Boko Haram recently carried out a string of bombings on Christmas Day, including against a church in the capital Abuja which killed dozens of people.

Earlier on Thursday, two suspected members of Boko Haram were arrested after a father and son were killed in Maiduguri in neighbouring Borno state.

Attacks by Boko Haram have become increasingly frequent and are a major problem for security agencies.

The President has vowed to "crush" the group.

Several northern states surrounding Gombe have had their borders sealed off under the state of emergency declared by Jonathan following the Christmas bombings.

Boko Haram is fighting to create an Islamic state and wants to impose Sharia law across Nigeria.

Followers of Boko Haram believe any political or social activity associated with Western values should be banned.

This includes voting in elections, wearing shirts and trousers and receiving a secular education.

Boko Haram regards the Nigerian state as being run by non-believers and this was the case even when the country had a Muslim president.
this group boko haram, who is the local name for al kaeda in Nigeria, have been involved in many bombings, most infamous the Christmas day bombing on 25th Dec 2011 that killed dozens and the UN office bombing in Abuja Nigeria also in Aug 2011....

this group have long had relationships with its offshoots sister groups in North Africa ( especially al kaeda in Maghreb , Niger ,Mauritania) and its close relationship with saudi clerics and fundings.....

not only it has been bombing churches, but recently the group has issued warning to Christians to leave Northern Nigeria or face death....

also boko haram had links to the nigerian who tried to bomb a usa airline in 2010 on Christmas day by hiding a bomb in his underwear, ( hence the nickname the underwear bomber).........BTW his mother was yemeni


some history of the group

History
Boko Haram is a controversial Nigerian militant Islamist group that seeks the imposition of Shariah law in the northern states of Nigeria.

The term \"Boko Haram\" comes from the Hausa word boko meaning \"Animist, western or otherwise non-Islamic education\" and the Arabic word haram figuratively meaning \"sin\" (literally, \"forbidden\").

Boko Haram opposes not only Western education, but Western culture and modern science as well
The group was founded in 2002 in Maiduguri by Ustaz Mohammed Yusuf. In 2004 it moved to Kanamma, Yobe State, where it set up a base called \"Afghanistan\", used to attack nearby police outposts, killing police officers.Yusuf is hostile to democracy and the secular education system, vowing that \"this war that is yet to start would continue for long\" if the political and educational system was not changed.

Prior to the clashes, many Muslim leaders and at least one military official had warned the authorities about Boko Haram. Those warnings were reportedly ignored.


Boko Haram Attacks
In the state of Yobe, fighters reportedly \"used fuel-laden motorcycles\" and \"bows with poison arrows\" to attack a police station. On 30 July, allegations were made that Yusuf himself was killed by Nigerian security forces after being taken into custody.

In January 2010, the group struck again in the Nigerian state of Borno, killing four people in Dala Alemderi ward in Maiduguri metropolis.

On September 7, 2010, Boko Haram freed over 700 inmates from a prison in Bauchi State.
In December 2010, Boko Haram was blamed for a market bombing, following which 92 of its members were arrested by police.

On Friday January 28, 2011, a gubernatorial candidate was assassinated, along with his brother and four police officers.

On March 29, police “thwarted a plot to bomb an (ANPP) election rally” in Maiduguri, Borno State. The threat was blamed on Boko Haram. On April 1 (the day before the original date of Nigeria’s legislative elections), suspected Boko Haram members attacked a police station in Bauchi . On April 9, a polling center in Maiduguri was bombed. On April 15, the Maiduguri office of the Independent National Electoral Commission was bombed, and several people were shot in a separate incident on the same day. Authorities suspected Boko Haram. On April 20, Boko Haram killed a Muslim cleric and ambushed several police officers in Maiduguri. On April 22, Boko Haram freed 14 prisoners during a jailbreak in Yola, Adamawa State

On Tuesday February 8, 2011, Boko Haram gave conditions for peace. The radicals demanded that the Borno State Governor, Senator Ali Modu Sheriff, should step down from office with immediate effect and also allow members to reclaim their mosque in Maiduguri, the capital of Borno State. On 9th May 2011 Boko Haram rejected an offer for amnesty made by the governor-elect of Borno state, Kashim Shettima

Boko Haram was blamed for a series of bombings in northern Nigeria on May 29, 2011 that left 15 dead.
On June 17, 2011, the group claimed responsibility for a bombing attack on the police force headquarters in Abuja that occurred the previous day. Officials believed that the attack was the first suicide bombing in Nigeria\'s history and that it specifically targeted Police Inspector-General Hafiz Ringim.
 
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  • HannaTheCrusader

    HannaTheCrusader

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    Gunmen believed to be members of the Boko Haram that has claimed responsibility for a wave of bloody attacks in the north, killed 28 people and wounded many others on Thursday and Friday in Gombe and Mubi, Adamawa State.

    Eyewitnesses said the gunmen had stormed the venue of a meeting in Mubi and fired directly into the crowd, which was said to have gathered to discuss how to transport the body of their kinsman shot dead on Thursday evening by unidentified assassins on motorcycles.

    As a result of the incident, which occurred about 24 hours after another set of suspected Boko Haram militants launched a deadly attack on a church in a town in neighbouring Gombe State, panic has spread among southerners resident in Mubi.

    The Gombe killings had taken place during a prayer service in a branch of the Deeper Life Christian Church in Nassarawo.

    Reports monitored online said the attackers, who were many and armed with AK47 rifles, had shot through the windows of the church, killing six worshippers and wounding 10 others. One of the dead was the wife of the pastor of the church, Mr. Johnson Jauro.

    Both attacks came before the expiration of a three-day ultimatum issued by Boko Haram to southern Christians living in northern Nigeria to pack and leave the region or face dire consequences.

    The sect had reacted to President Goodluck Jonathan’s declaration of a state of emergency in four states in the north.

    Following the Christmas Day bombing of a Catholic church in Madalla, a community near Abuja, the President made a decisive move to check the surge in sectarian and ethnic violence in the north by imposing emergency rule in 15 local government Areas in Yobe, Borno, Plateau, and Niger states.

    As a result of the bloody Friday attack, many Igbo traders in Mubi town are said to have closed their shops and getting ready to flee the area.

    A purported spokesman for Boko Haram on Friday claimed responsibility for the attack on the Igbo community meeting and the church in Gombe.
     
    HannaTheCrusader

    HannaTheCrusader

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    Timeline of Boko Haram attacks and related violence

    Bombings and shootings by the militant Islamic group Boko Haram - also known as Jama’atu Ahlus Sunnah Lid Da’awati Wal Jihad - have increased sharply in recent months, leaving many worried that wide-scale sectarian violence could break out. Some 80 people have been killed in Boko Haram (BH) attacks in recent weeks, while 500 are reported to have been killed over the past year. Tens of thousands of Nigerians have been forced to flee their homes.

    As the government struggles to cope, experts are urging leaders to seek a political solution to try to quell BH violence, backed up by sharper intelligence-gathering and professional military support. Below is a chronology of proven or suspected BH attacks - both recent and over the past few years.

    18 Jan 2012: A key suspect in the 2011 Christmas Day bombing in Abuja, which killed more than 40 people, escapes police custody.

    17 Jan 2012: Two soldiers and four BH gunmen are killed in an attack on a military checkpoint in Maiduguri, Borno State. Soldiers arrest six high-profile BH members in a raid on a sect hideout in the city.

    13 Jan 2012: BH kills four and injures two others, including a policeman, in two separate attacks on pubs in Yola (Adawama State) and Gombe city in neighbouring Gombe State.

    11 Jan 2012: Four Christians killed by BH gunmen in Potiskum, Yobe State, when gunmen open fire on their car as they stop for fuel. The victims had been fleeing Maiduguri to their home town in eastern Nigeria.

    10 Jan 2012: A BH attack on a beer garden kills eight, including five policemen and a teenage girl, in Damaturu, capital of Yobe State.

    9 Jan 2012: BH gunmen shoot dead a secret police operative along with his civilian friend as they leave a mosque in Biu, Borno State, 200km south of the state capital, Maiduguri. The president says BH has infiltrated the executive, parliamentary and judicial wings of government.

    7 Jan 2012: Three Christian poker players are killed and seven others wounded by BH gunmen in the town of Biu.

    6 Jan 2012: Eight worshippers are killed in a shooting attack on a church in Yola. BH gunmen shoot dead 17 Christian mourners in the town of Mubi in the northeastern state of Adamawa. The victims are friends and relations of one of five people killed in a BH attack on a hotel the previous day.

    5 Jan 2012: Six worshippers are killed and 10 others wounded when BH gunmen attack a church in Gombe city.

    3 Jan 2012: BH gunmen attack a police station in the town of Birniwa in Jigawa State killing a teenage girl and wounding a police officer.

    1 Jan 2012: President Goodluck Jonathan imposes a state of emergency on 15 local government areas hardest-hit by BH attacks, in Borno, Yobe and Plateau states. He orders the closure of Nigerian borders in the north.

    30 Dec 2011: Four Muslim worshippers are killed in a BH bomb and shooting attack targeting a military checkpoint in Maiduguri as worshippers leave a mosque after attending Friday prayers.

    28 Dec 2011: A bombing and shooting attack by BH on a beer parlour in the town of Mubi, Adamawa State, wounds 15.

    25 Dec 2011: A Christmas Day BH bomb attack on Saint Theresa Catholic Church in Madalla town near Abuja kills 42 worshippers. Three secret police (SSS) operatives and a BH bomber are killed in a suicide attack when the bomber rams his bomb-laden car into a military convoy at the gates of SSS headquarters in Damaturu. A policeman is killed in a botched BH bomb attack on a church in the Ray Field area of Jos, capital of Plateau State.

    22 Dec 2011: BH bombs in parts of Maiduguri kill 20. Four policemen and a civilian are killed in gun and bomb attacks on a police building in Potiskum, Yobe State. Around 100 are killed following multiple bomb and shooting attacks by BH gunmen and ensuing gun battles with troops in the Pompomari outskirts of Damaturu.

    19 Dec 2011: One suspected BH member dies and two others wounded in an accidental explosion while assembling a home-made bomb in a hideout in Damaturu.

    17 Dec 2011: A shootout between sect members and policemen following a raid on the hideout of a BH sect leader in the Darmanawa area of Kano State kills seven, including three police officers. Police arrest 14 BH suspects and seize large amount of arms and bombs. Three BH members die in an accidental explosion while assembling home-made bombs in a hideout on the outskirts of Maiduguri.

    13 Dec 2011: A bomb attack on a military checkpoint by BH and resulting shooting by soldiers in Maiduguri leaves 10 dead and 30 injured.

    7 Dec 2011: An explosion linked to BH kills eight in the Oriyapata district of Kaduna city.

    4 Dec 2011: A soldier, a policeman and a civilian are killed in bomb and gun attacks on police buildings and two banks in Azare, Bauchi State. BH open fire at a wedding in Maiduguri, killing the groom and a guest.

    27 Nov 2011: A Borno State protocol officer in the office of the governor is shot dead by motorcycle-riding sect members while driving home.

    26 Nov 2011: Three policemen and a civilian are wounded in BH bomb and shooting attacks in Geidam, Yobe State. Six churches, a police station, a beer parlour, a shopping complex, a high court, a local council building and 11 cars are burnt in the attacks.

    9 Nov 2011: BH members bomb a police station and the office of Nigeria’s road safety agency in Maina village, Borno State. No one is hurt.

    4 Nov 2011: The motorcade of Borno State governor Kashim Shettima comes under BH bomb attack in Maiduguri on its way from the airport to the governor’s residence as he returns from a trip to Abuja. Around 150 are killed in coordinated BH bombing and shooting attacks on police facilities in Damaturu and Potiskum in Yobe State. Two BH suicide-bombers blow themselves up outside the military Joint Task Force headquarters in Maiduguri in a botched suicide attack.

    2 Nov 2011: A soldier on duty is shot dead by sect members outside Maiduguri’s main market.

    November 2011: BH says it will not dialogue with the government until all of its members who have been arrested are released.

    29 Oct 2011: BH gunmen shoot dead Muslim cleric Sheikh Ali Jana’a outside his home in the Bulabulin Ngarnam neighbourhood of Maiduguri. Jana’a is known to have provided information to security forces regarding the sect.

    25 Oct 2011: A policeman is shot dead in his house in a targeted attack by BH gunmen in Damaturu.

    23 Oct 2011: Sect members open fire on a market in the town of Katari in Kaduna State, killing two.

    23 Oct 2011: BH members kill a policeman and a bank security guard in bombing and shooting attacks on a police station and two banks in Saminaka, Kaduna State.

    3 October 2011: Three killed in BH attacks on Baga market in Maiduguri, Borno State. The victims included a tea-seller, a drug store owner and a passer-by.

    1 October 2011: A butcher and his assistant are killed by BH gunmen at Baga market in Maiduguri in a targeted killing. In a separate incident, three people are killed in a shoot-out following BH bomb and shooting attacks on a military patrol vehicle delivering food to soldiers at a checkpoint in Maiduguri. All three victims are civilians.

    17 September 2011: Babakura Fugu, brother-in-law to slain BH leader Mohammed Yusuf, is shot dead outside his house in Maiduguri two days after attending a peace meeting with Nigeria’s ex-President Olusegun Obasanjo in the city. BH denies any involvement in the incident.

    13 September 2011: Four soldiers shot and wounded in an ambush by BH members in Maiduguri shortly after the arrest of 15 sect members in military raids on BH hideouts in the city.

    12 September 2011: Seven men, including four policemen, are killed by BH gunmen in bomb and shooting attacks on a police station and a bank in Misau, Bauchi State. The attackers rob the bank.

    4 September 2011: Muslim cleric Malam Dala shot dead by two BH members outside his home in the Zinnari area of Maiduguri.

    1 September 2011: A shootout between BH gunmen and soldiers in Song, Adamawa State, kills one sect members while another is injured and captured.

    26 August 2011: BH claims responsibility for a suicide bomb blast on the UN compound in Abuja, killing 23 people.

    25 August 2011: Gun and bomb attacks by BH on two police stations and two banks in Gombi, Adamawa State, kill at least 16 people, including seven policemen.

    3 August 2011: The government rejects negotiations with BH.

    July 2011: Government says it will open a negotiation panel to initiate negotiations with BH.

    27 June 2011: BH’s gun and bomb attack on a beer garden in Maiduguri leaves at least 25 dead and dozens injured.

    20 June 2011: Seven people including five policemen killed in gun and bomb attacks on a police station and a bank in Kankara, Katsina State.

    16 June 2011: BH targets national police headquarters in Abuja, killing two.

    7 June 2011: Attacks on a church and two police posts in Maiduguri, blamed on the sect, leave at least 14 dead.

    6 June 2011: Muslim cleric Ibrahim Birkuti, critical of BH, shot dead by two motorcycle-riding BH gunmen outside his house in Biu, 200km from Maiduguri.

    29 May 2011: Three bombs rip through a beer garden in a military barracks in the northern city of Bauchi, killing 13 and wounding 33. BH claims responsibility.

    27 May 2011: A group of around 70 suspected BH gunmen kill eight people including four policemen in simultaneous gun and bomb attacks on a police station, a police barracks and a bank in Damboa, Borno State, near the border with Chad.

    29 December 2010: Suspected BH gunmen shoot dead eight people in Maiduguri, including the governorship candidate of the ruling All Nigeria Peoples Party (ANPP) in Borno State.

    24 and 27 December 2010: A series of attacks claimed by BH in the central city of Jos and Maiduguri kill at least 86.

    7 September 2010: A group of BH gunmen free over 700 inmates including around 100 sect members from a prison in Bauchi. Four people including a soldier, one policeman and two residents were killed in the raid.

    26 July 2009: BH launches a short-lived uprising in parts of the north, which is quelled by a military crackdown that leaves more than 800 dead - mostly sect members, including BH leader Mohammed Yusuf. A mosque in the capital of Borno State (Maiduguri) that served as a sect headquarters is burnt down.

    11-12 June 2009: BH leader Mohammed Yusuf threatens reprisals in a video recording to the president following the killing of 17 BH members in a joint military and police operation in Borno State. This was after a disagreement over BH members’ alleged refusal to use crash helmets while in a funeral procession to bury members who had died in a car accident.

    2005-2008: BH concentrated on recruiting new members and shoring up its resources. As evidence of their growing popularity, Borno State governor Ali Modu Sheriff appoints an influential BH member, Buju Foi, as his commissioner of religious affairs in 2007.

    10 October 2004: Gunmen from a BH splinter group attack a convoy of 60 policemen in an ambush near the town of Kala-Balge on the border with Chad. The militants took 12 policemen hostage and police authorities presumed they were killed by the gunmen because all attempts to trace them failed.

    23 September 2004: A BH splinter group launches a militia attack on police stations in the towns of Gwoza and Bama in Borno State, killing four policemen and two civilians. They took to the Mandara mountains along the Nigeria-Cameroon border. Soldiers and two gunships were deployed in the mountains and after two days of battle 27 sect members were killed while the rest slipped away. Five BH members who crossed into Cameroon were arrested by Cameroonian gendarmes who had been alerted by Nigerian authorities. The five were deported and handed over to Nigerian authorities.

    7 January 2004: Seven members of BH killed and three others arrested by a team of local vigilantes outside the town of Damboa, Borno State, near border with Chad. Bags containing AK-47 rifles were recovered from sect members.

    June 2004: Four members of BH were killed by prison guards in a foiled jail break in Yobe State capital Damaturu.

    23-31 December 2003: A group of about 200 members of a BH splinter group launched attacks on police stations in the towns of Kanamma and Geidam in Yobe State from their enclave outside Kanamma on the Nigerian border with Niger. The militants killed several policemen and requisitioned police weapons and vehicles. Following the deployment of military troops to contain the insurrection, 18 militants were killed, and a number arrested.

    2002: Mohammed Yusuf founded Boko Haram in 2002, establishing a mosque called Markaz as the headquarters of his movement, following his expulsion from two mosques in Maiduguri by Muslim clerics for propagating his radical views.
     
    LebReporter

    LebReporter

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    Yea hanna 2ino who support those shity people? isnt saudi usa israel europe? they just want to divide africa to 100 country so they can steal what is left if anything is left.
     
    HannaTheCrusader

    HannaTheCrusader

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    Yea hanna 2ino who support those shity people? isnt saudi usa israel europe? they just want to divide africa to 100 country so they can steal what is left if anything is left.
    all these sheiks and militants are supported/ studied/ funded by saudi govt or individual

    the same way these salafis they have been operating all over the world,only in Nigeria case they will end up bringing calamity to themselves and their ownpeople, because in that nation the Christians are more and richer, so when ever the Christian community will react, they will be blood bath on an imaginable scales ( 100 Thousand killed) and since the North Muslim is poor and has no raw materials and depend on the Christian South for money, they will end up driving their people to more and more abject poverty and backwardness....

    BS: over whelming majority of Nigerian muslims hates and do not support boko haram, but sadly will end up paying the price for these wahhabis atrocities.....
     
    HannaTheCrusader

    HannaTheCrusader

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    death toll from last friday bombs

    The Nigerian Red Cross now estimates more than 150 people died in Friday’s attack in Kano, which saw at least two suicide bombers from the sect known as Boko Haram detonate explosive-laden cars. The scope of the attack, apparently planned to free sect members held by authorities here, left even President Goodluck Jonathan speechless as he toured what remained of a regional police headquarters Sunday.
    Friday’s attacks by Boko Haram hit police stations, immigration offices and the local headquarters of Nigeria’s secret police in Kano, a city of more than 9 million people that remains an important political and religious centre in the country’s Muslim north. The assault left corpses lying in the streets across the city, many wearing police or other security agency uniforms.
     
    Dynamite Joe

    Dynamite Joe

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    this group boko haram, who is the local name for al kaeda in Nigeria, have been involved in many bombings, most infamous the Christmas day bombing on 25th Dec 2011 that killed dozens and the UN office bombing in Abuja Nigeria also in Aug 2011....

    this group have long had relationships with its offshoots sister groups in North Africa ( especially al kaeda in Maghreb , Niger ,Mauritania) and its close relationship with saudi clerics and fundings.....

    not only it has been bombing churches, but recently the group has issued warning to Christians to leave Northern Nigeria or face death....

    also boko haram had links to the nigerian who tried to bomb a usa airline in 2010 on Christmas day by hiding a bomb in his underwear, ( hence the nickname the underwear bomber).........BTW his mother was yemeni
    Sounds like you're beating the war drum on the behalf of America. Another oil rich country that needs to be cleansed from Al Qaeda, how convenient. And since you have a black president in the white house, African Americans cannot brand him as racist, just a humanitarian bringing democracy and freedom to another evil oil rich country :D The conditions for toppling the government and installing a puppet are perfect, aren't they? How dare they ban western education in an African country, they must be savages these Nigerians.
     
    HannaTheCrusader

    HannaTheCrusader

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    Sounds like you're beating the war drum on the behalf of America. Another oil rich country that needs to be cleansed from Al Qaeda, how convenient. And since you have a black president in the white house, African Americans cannot brand him as racist, just a humanitarian bringing democracy and freedom to another evil oil rich country :D The conditions for toppling the government and installing a puppet are perfect, aren't they? How dare they ban western education in an African country, they must be savages these Nigerians.
    you have no clue to what you are saying...no idea really :)

    majority of nigerians are pro usa to start with and usa does not need to install a friendly regime there. usa grants over 25K visas yearly to nigerians and there are over 2 Mil Nigerians in the states.

    boko haram are product of saudi financing and by extension usa policies, why there are surfacing now ? is still any one guess ? but definitely not to change any regime as these idiots dont even have wide support among muslims.

    the only scenario that comes to mind is to split the country into two ( muslim north, christian south) and that is not a bad idea at all.....

    kaddafi was one of the main sposnors of boko haram

    lebanese are very powerful in nigeria and do compete head to head with israelis, so thats an angle that we can not ignore....although we are well connected whether in the north or south part..
     
    Dynamite Joe

    Dynamite Joe

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    you have no clue to what you are saying...no idea really :)

    majority of nigerians are pro usa to start with and usa does not need to install a friendly regime there. usa grants over 25K visas yearly to nigerians and there are over 2 Mil Nigerians in the states.

    boko haram are product of saudi financing and by extension usa policies, why there are surfacing now ? is still any one guess ? but definitely not to change any regime as these idiots dont even have wide support among muslims.

    the only scenario that comes to mind is to split the country into two ( muslim north, christian south) and that is not a bad idea at all.....

    kaddafi was one of the main sposnors of boko haram

    lebanese are very powerful in nigeria and do compete head to head with israelis, so thats an angle that we can not ignore....although we are well connected whether in the north or south part..

    So what if the U.S. grants 25k visas to Nigerians. Splitting the country is a lot more drastic than regime change. It’s also the most effective way to gain more influence in Nigeria’s internal affairs, which is classic U.S. policy towards oil rich nations. Dividing a populace makes it easier to manipulate them. Let’s be frank here, you’re getting horny over the division of the country so that Christians - at the expense of Muslims – create their own independent state. That’s your only motive in posting all this info; you’re sounding like a pervert waiting to ejaculate over western dominance of Nigeria. And I don’t expect to get a straight answer from you on why you think western education should be imposed on a sovereign African nation with it’s own educational system and culture.
     
    HannaTheCrusader

    HannaTheCrusader

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    So what if the U.S. grants 25k visas to Nigerians. Splitting the country is a lot more drastic than regime change. It’s also the most effective way to gain more influence in Nigeria’s internal affairs, which is classic U.S. policy towards oil rich nations. Dividing a populace makes it easier to manipulate them. Let’s be frank here, you’re getting horny over the division of the country so that Christians - at the expense of Muslims – create their own independent state. That’s your only motive in posting all this info; you’re sounding like a pervert waiting to ejaculate over western dominance of Nigeria. And I don’t expect to get a straight answer from you on why you think western education should be imposed on a sovereign African nation with it’s own educational system and culture.
    me ??? happy about western dominance ? hahahaha

    for the last time, Nigerians will and will always be pro usa policies no matter who rules Nigeria..

    as for the split, i am not for it, but if the saudis keep pumping money into their creation boko haram, than yes its time to teach these wahhabis another lesson and eject them into their own miserable northern state....
     
    HannaTheCrusader

    HannaTheCrusader

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    An Associated Press report captures how some youths in Kano jubilated over the attacks carried out by the violent Islamic sect, Boko Haram, in the ancient city on Tuesday.

    The angry youths piled on top of the burnt-out truck near a blood-spattered police station Wednesday in Nigeria’s north, alternating praises for the radical Islamist sect that bombed the precinct and promising to kill any officer who returned.

    The crowd overran the station that morning following an attack there the previous night, apparently by the sect known as Boko Haram, which last week killed at least 185 people in a coordinated assault that struck several police stations in the country’s second-largest city of Kano.

    Their jubilation underscored a growing danger from Nigeria’s exploding population: a swarming unemployed and undereducated youth across the north whose anger at Nigeria’s corrupt and weak central government make them ready recruits for the sect and other radicals.

    “The poorer Muslim north sees systemic bias in the provision of basic services and repeated incidents of police brutality,” a recent report from Washington-based think tank The Jamestown Foundation said.

    Suspected members of Boko Haram surrounded the police station Tuesday night in the Sheka neighborhood of the sprawling and dusty city of Kano, home to more than nine million people. The gunmen ordered civilians to get off the street, then began chanting “God is great” as they threw homemade bombs into the station and sprayed it with assault rifle fire, witnesses said.

    Associated Press journalists saw youths overrun the station on Wednesday, as black soot and smoke charred its walls. Doors to jail cells stood open. Blood coated the floor of the local commander’s private bathroom. Investigative files apparently rifled through by attackers or the crowd covered the floors.

    Older men around the neighborhood attempted to calm down the youths gathered there, with one trying to lock up the station while security forces remained nowhere to be seen. Most Muslims across Nigeria’s north say they disapprove of Boko Haram, which claimed the assault Friday in Kano that killed at least 185 people.

    “We are not satisfied with what is happening now,” said 26-year-old Abubakar Muawuya. Our leaders “have to call this Boko Haram and sit down with them.”

    But the group there remained jubilant, repeatedly beating on the burnt-out truck. Cheering youths waved an officer’s uniform and others jumped up and down on the truck, with one wearing a police ballistic helmet.

    Some also ominously asked journalists visiting the site if they were Christians.

    Nigeria’s youth represent what a British Council report last year described as a looming “demographic disaster” for Africa’s most populous nation. Estimates in the report suggest Nigeria’s population of more than 160 million people will swell by another 53 million people by 2050. And while the country makes billions from producing oil, agriculture and other vocations have wilted away, meaning fewer jobs for the growing population where many earn less than $2 a day without access to electricity or clean drinking water.

    Illiteracy remains high as an education gap grows wider — children have access to better schooling in the Christian-majority south compared to those in the Muslim north, the report said. Analysts worry that will give extremist groups like Boko Haram fertile grounds to grow as well.
     
    fidelio

    fidelio

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    I apologize for the horrid picture but atrocities warrant some stomachs to be turned every once and a while. This is a picture from Lebanonfiles, supposedly showing charred bodies of people of Christian faith. the perpetrators are obviously supposed to be Boko Haram.

     
    nonsense

    nonsense

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    I apologize for the horrid picture but atrocities warrant some stomachs to be turned every once and a while. This is a picture from Lebanonfiles, supposedly showing charred bodies of people of Christian faith. the perpetrators are obviously supposed to be Boko Haram.

    This picture is from the victims of a fuel tanker accident in the Democratic Republic of Congo in July 2010.

    See here:

    Fuel tanker explosion kills over 230 in Congo | Reuters

    230 people were killed when a fuel tanker overturned and exploded | Help us in helping someone

    FleetWatch - mw-07-400 dead

    Its bad that its circulating on facebook and other media as the work of Boko Haram.
     
    Dynamite Joe

    Dynamite Joe

    Well-Known Member
    me ??? happy about western dominance ? hahahaha

    for the last time, Nigerians will and will always be pro usa policies no matter who rules Nigeria..

    as for the split, i am not for it, but if the saudis keep pumping money into their creation boko haram, than yes its time to teach these wahhabis another lesson and eject them into their own miserable northern state....
    Nigerians are not all pro-America, far from it. That's just propaganda which you've obviously accepted as fact.
     
    HannaTheCrusader

    HannaTheCrusader

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    I apologize for the horrid picture but atrocities warrant some stomachs to be turned every once and a while. This is a picture from Lebanonfiles, supposedly showing charred bodies of people of Christian faith. the perpetrators are obviously supposed to be Boko Haram.

    This picture is from the victims of a fuel tanker accident in the Democratic Republic of Congo in July 2010.

    See here:

    Fuel tanker explosion kills over 230 in Congo | Reuters

    230 people were killed when a fuel tanker overturned and exploded | Help us in helping someone

    FleetWatch - mw-07-400 dead

    Its bad that its circulating on facebook and other media as the work of Boko Haram.
    whether the picture true or not . al kaeda supporters have killed hundreds of christians in Nigeria..the Jos riots where they attacked native christians in the living in mainly muslim region is horrific


    The Plateau State Police Command said 326 people lost their lives in the recent Jos crisis while 313 people were arrested.

    The state’s new Acting Police Commissioner, Ikehukwu Aduba, said this while briefing newsmen on Monday in Jos.

    He said that out of the 313 persons arrested, 139 had been transferred to the Force Headquarters because of congestion in the police stations in Jos.

    The commissioner condemned the crisis, saying, “what happened in Jos was never religious but man’s inhumanity to man.” He said the mandate given to him by the Inspector-General of Police was to maintain permanent peace in Plateau State and that he was more than ready to do the job.

    According to the commissioner, the military are fully in charge, but operationally, “it is a joint action to curb the excesses of any act of lawlessness.” “Police is to work hand-in-hand with the military. And also, the relationship is very cordial,” he said, adding that, “the crisis is condemnable and there is a colossal loss both in human lives and property.

    “There was mindless killing perpetrated by demon-incarnates,” Mr. Aduba said.

    He added that investigations were on and that all the perpetrators of the crisis would be prosecuted.

    The police commissioner also said that many of those who instigated the disturbances were known and were on the run, but that “the long arm of the law will soon catch up with them.” Mr. Abuba described the crisis as “an affray that was hijacked in the name of religion by demons with human faces”.

    On the locations of the violence, he said that “the mindless killings were carried out in places like Kuru-Jenta, Timtim and other places.

    “The suspects are known and are on the run and, if they fail to give themselves up,

    they will be declared wanted.” The commissioner called on members of the public to cooperate with the security agencies to maintain peace.

    He condemned rumour-mongering and the use of mobile phones to spread falsehood,

    saying that the casualty at the place where the mayhem started was not more than four.

    The commissioner said there is no truth in the allegation of the involvement of persons in uniform in the killings and described the report as “yellow journalism”.

    Consequently, he called on journalists to always help to water down crisis situations in the county in order not to scare people and drive away foreign investors.

    On the number of people killed at Kuru, he said the number was not as high as the 150 speculated, but that the police had so far recorded “over sixty”.
     
    J

    JayM

    Active Member
    Time for partition in Nigeria?
    BY COLTON BRYDGES
    10 January 2012



    Stability has been a fleeting concept for Nigeria since its independence in 1960. Numerous military coups, a civil war, and various forms of internal unrest have rocked this post-colonial behemoth. The latest major threat, the militant Islamist group Boko Haram, has moved from drive-by shootings into more sinister bombings, culminating in a Christmas Day attack on several churches and police stations. This latest round of violence has raised the question for some of whether or not the state of Nigeria, as it currently exists, is governable.

    The emergence of Boko Haram as a legitimate threat to Nigeria’s stability is perhaps indicative of an increased polarization between the primarily Christian South and the Muslim North. Boko Haram, whose stated intention is to rid the country of their Western style education system inherited from Britain, has moved toward full-scale religious purification. They have set about this task by carrying out numerous drive-by shootings, and has now graduating to coordinated bombing attacks.

    In addition to a number of bombings by Boko Haram in the capital of Abuja, including President Goodluck Jonathan’s inauguration ceremony, Nigeria has seen numerous instances of religious violence between Christians and Muslims in the Plateau State of Jos.

    Nigeria has never been particularly cohesive, with distrust and animosity between the majority Yoruba South-West, the Igbo South-East and the Hausa Muslim North a longstanding trend. But recent events seem to indicate a more intense North-South fissure along religious lines, leading to recurring grumblings that a partition is the only way to rescue a country that, despite its oil wealth, remains heavily impoverished, and now seems stricken with sectarian violence.

    The idea of partitioning Nigeria was notably raised by ex-African Union chief and now deceased Libyan dictator Muammar Gaddafi in response to the 2010 killings in Jos. Many proponents would likely point to a partition as merely correcting the gross mistake made by the British in granting independence to a state wholly lacking in cohesion. Under colonialism Southern Nigeria saw a fairly strong British presence, while the North was largely left under the control of traditional emirs. Even after unification, the tripartite division between North, West and East remained heavily institutionalized.

    While perhaps partition would have been beneficial several decades ago, the effectiveness of such a strategy in ending violence in the 21st century is doubtful. Though a Southern Nigerian state would be economically viable, given its possession of much of the country’s oil wealth, a Northern state would - with its large population - be horribly impoverished. Despite the billions of dollars in oil revenue, the North has remained woefully underdeveloped.

    The parallels with Sudan, another former British colony, are undeniable. Northern Sudan under colonialism was ruled by Egypt, resulting in a primarily Muslim and Arab identity, while the South was more directly controlled by the British, creating a more Christian character. Unification of the two territories as an independent state resulted in nearly fifty years of civil war, and claimed millions of lives before South Sudan became an independent state last year.

    Much like Northern Nigeria now, South Sudan viewed itself as incompatible with the North, an opinion few would dispute. However, much like Northern Nigeria, South Sudan is also extremely underdeveloped. Furthermore, the recent flare-ups along the Sudanese border should serve as a warning that partitions are rarely peaceful.

    The partition of India should also serve as a notable deterrent. Though some may argue that it was a necessary evil that prevented even further death and destruction, the human cost of the 1947 partition was immense, and considerable animosity remains between Pakistan and India. Furthermore, sectarian violence in India continues to occur sporadically and even seems to be increasing in recent years.

    It is unclear who would benefit from a partition in Nigeria, besides the South perhaps feeling less burdened with having to support a restless and impoverished North. Though some may feel that a partition may indeed bring an end to fighting between Muslim and Christian Nigerians, one must remember that no region of Nigeria is in any way homogeneous: there are minority pockets throughout the country who would risk being targeted in the wake of a partition, very much like the thousands killed in 1947 with the partition of India.

    Finally, one must not forget the incredibly pertinent example of Biafra’s attempted secession in 1967, which resulted in a civil war claiming the lives of around one million people. The human cost of partitioning a state is without question a high one.

    Of course, blindly advocating the status quo is an equally costly course of action. Few would begrudge South Sudan for freeing itself from decades of targeted ethnic cleansing. But it remains highly doubtful that partitioning Nigeria would solve anything. The sheer diversity of Nigeria means that splitting the country would likely only lead to more violence, while not addressing the roots issues of underdevelopment and religious differences in the North.

    The status quo is currently not working in Nigeria, nor has it for quite some time. But partitioning the state is not the answer. If the money formerly devoted to petroleum subsidies (which has created an equally dangerous backlash from the populace) can be effectively reinvested to quell the dissatisfaction of Nigeria’s poor, perhaps some semblance of order can be restored to this rich yet troubled state.
     
    HannaTheCrusader

    HannaTheCrusader

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    for the time being i doubt that Nigeria will split, no major tribe is calling for that for the time being....

    mainly die to the fact that some main christians tribes ( Ijoh) where the oil is located in their region do not trust the other christian tribes and prefer to deal with the Hausa-Fulani ( muslim tribes)

    the most likely outcome is a state of anarchy in the muslim north and sectarian flare ups from time to time....
     
    dodzi

    dodzi

    Legendary Member
    Sorry bess chou khass Amrika?

    Every time somebody farts it's either GMA's fault or the US' fault.

    While I'm not defending US policy in most places in the world, you can't put the blame on the US if some radical group massacres others with terrorist attacks!

    Time for the universal relativists in this forum to accept that there is a threat called "radical Islam" (just like there's a radical Christian threat in the US), and that these people act and think independently, whether or not they receive funds from Saudi Arabia.
     
    Rafidi

    Rafidi

    Legendary Member
    Mr.Hanna,

    i think it is very wrong of you to lump all the fightings in the north of nigeria that has taken place under the idea of wahhabi or alqaeda terror.

    you are implicitly trying to give the Hausa/fulani people as a whole the title of being alqaeda supporters.

    that is not true.in nigeria aside from religious divide which is being exploited right now with the emergence of boko haram,there is also very big division may be even bigger which is ethnicity.

    let me correct you that boko haram could be an alqaeda oriented movement and with possible CIA-MOSSAD engineering.many reasons could be put forth for such theories.but one thing is certain,the Muslims in Nigeria be they in the northern part of the country (i.e. the hausa-fulani) or the southern part are in no way supporting boko haram or even sympathizing with boko haram.boko haram faced injustice from the nigeria security forces when its leader and members were killed in extra-judicial manner.definitely,even with that,boko haram adopted wrong tactics and the killing of innocent people which turned all muslims and all nigerians against them.no one sympathizes with them.

    do not try to paint the boko haram issue as muslim VS christian.the muslims do not recognize boko haram as having anything to do with them.boko haram is trying to play on the religious divide and the usual alqaeda salafist technique of "killing the infidels".but they failed because they have actually killed more muslims in nigeria than christians.recently in Kano,the attacks killed muslims!

    furthermore,in the south-west where the yorubas are predominant,you see there are possibly more yoruba muslims than yoruba christians.so the south is not what the western media want us to believe that it is a christian south vs a muslim north.the south is not homogenous.it is not an entity.there are six geo-political zones in nigeria: North-west,North-east,North-Central (all three predominantly hausa-fulani muslims) and the south-west (predominantly yorubas divided between muslims and christians),south-east (the igbos,mostly christians and animists) and the south-south (minorities mostly christian and animists).

    so really the south is not a political or even ethnic or religious entity.you have the yorubas (who are muslims and christians) in the south-west,you have the igbos who are mostly christians and animists in the south-east and you have the minorities living in the south-south who are also mostly christians and animists.assuming there is to be partition in Nigeria,the geo-political zones would be ungovernable especially the ones in the "south".the minorities in the south-south the area referred to as the "niger-delta" (rich in oil) will definitely want their own indepence and will not allow either the igbos or the yorubas to rule over them or impose themselves.also even amongst themselves the niger-deltans are very divided.in other words,any partition is recipe for further instability and divisions and civil wars.

    regarding Jos and the muslim-christian fighting there,that has nothing to do with boko haram.the jos issue has being before boko haram was even formed.so this is also not alqaeda or wahhabi inspired hausa-fulanis killing christians.there is ethnic hatred in Jos (in addition to the role religious differences play).the christians in Jos are also very extremists.on Eid al-fitr,christian youths attacked muslims praying eid prayer,killed them and then went ahead to eat their flesh! the minority tribes in Jos see themselves as the indigenes of Jos and they are christians.the fulanis who are muslims are seen as settlers coming from further north.so really,as much as there is religious divide,certain issues like boko haram and the jos crisis must be understood in details and not within the simplistic tagging of muslim VS christian.

    i hope this explanation helps.
     
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