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an old demand reopened : Hadath municipality doesnt allow muslims to buy, rent properties

Walidos

Walidos

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
If there is no founded fears, it would be considered filth and discrimination. But, in a world hostile to Christians that not 3 decades ago, Christians were fighting for their existence in Lebanon, than stripped their political influence thereafter. You know maybe your memory is short, maybe because you think that Aoun and Bassil may last forever wel Christians in outmost great years; you never know in a flip of a second what happens.

Who would've seen coming that in less than 2 decades, Iraqi Christians were decimated in 10s of thousands? Syrian Christians were the target of takfiris, and Palestinian Christians bye bye... W Copts living under true discrimination and humiliation every single day.

W bet3ayyeb 3al massi7eh 7imeyet nafso? Smallah li2an the region is very tolerant. Henneh Mish tay2in ba3don w bi2tlo ba3don...baddak yer7amo massi7eh?
You have plenty of ways to “protect yourself”... there are plenty of prominent people within your society. Make a fund, Buy property off people who want/need to sell... resell it to others you think would protect you at no profit... you really don’t need to establish discrimination within a municipality... there are other ways. It bugs me that you don’t want to hear it... there are other ways. You and FPM should know better.
 
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  • JB81

    JB81

    Legendary Member
    You have plenty of ways to “protect yourself”... there are plenty of prominent people within your society. Make a fund, Buy property off people who want/need to sell... resell it to others you think would protect you at no profit... you really don’t need to establish discrimination within a municipality... there are other ways. It bugs me that you don’t want to hear it... there are other ways. You and FPM should know better.
    What are those ways? And how applicable are they?
     
    My Moria Moon

    My Moria Moon

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Muslims were inevitably going to move into Christian towns in the east and mountain towns closest to Beirut. The Lebanese economy is centered in Beirut. No one is graduating from college and then pursuing a career in Nabatieh, Bint Jbeil, Hermel, Akkar. Most of the career-oriented jobs are in and around Beirut.

    Now, the dilemma: 2-3 million Muslims do not fit in Beirut. Dahieh is already at overcapacity for over a decade now. I remember reading that 97% of developable land in Dahieh is fully developed. That’s massive and very dense. Where are these people in our generation and future generation going to move? One kid gets his parents’ apartment, but the rest have to go elsewhere. There is not much left to buy in Muslim areas, except for the multi million dollar apartments in Beirut which obviously most cannot afford. Their birthrates have stabilized in the last 20 years but that doesn’t mean that 3 million people can fit in Beirut and Dahieh. The problem is the territory that surrounds Beirut and Dahieh is almost entirely Christian. A Shia from Qana is not commuting to Beirut and back every day for work, so he has to move there. And with the low supply in Muslim areas proportionate to their population, they are going to the eastern suburbs. A Muslim from a northern or southern mountain may want similar climate, so he’ll move to a small town in Metn because he does not like the feel of a large humid city and is used to a breeze in the morning and night.

    If you want Muslims to stop moving into Christian areas, promote policies that encourage economic growth outside of Beirut’s metropolitan area. This keeps Muslims from having to migrate to Beirut from the other regions as they’d have non-agricultural opportunities in their home regions, and also helps Christians stay in their towns in the north, Bekaa, south too. I am less concerned about Hazmieh eventually being 30% Muslim than I am about the decreasing Christian presence in Akkar or east Saida or the villages in Bint Jbeil. A Muslim who takes issue with alcohol or is a conservative sectarian isn’t the type of Muslim moving to Hazmieh anyway. The Muslims moving to east Beirut areas are Muslims who want to raise their kids around Christians and around what is perceived to be Christian social culture. A wilyayet al faqih-supporting Shia or salafi Sunni is not trying to buy an apartment in Mansourieh or any predominantly Christian area anyway.
    Nice post, good analysis, reasonable explanation to what is happening.The tragic reality is that sectarian tribalism in Lebanon, by design, is perpetuating the chaotic and uncontrolled development.
    Until promised oil riches are extracted and after the due thefts tariffs and we are left with some money to spend on focus areas, there's no way on earth our politicians will be able to agree on and adopt policies aimed at improving economic conditions and growth in specific parts of the country. The rest will cry sectarian foul and ask for the same treatment of their "parts"; the cake to be distributed will rapidly shrink and we're stuck in the same cycle.
     
    Iron Maiden

    Iron Maiden

    Paragon of Bacon
    Orange Room Supporter
    What are those ways? And how applicable are they?
    Very easy, the maronite association can create a fund to buy property, and then rent those properties to other Christian families, rent them to associations who need some temporary locales.. mech kel chi daroure ya3mlo menno masare.

    Solutions are aplenty, one only needs to look outside the box
     
    JeanH

    JeanH

    Well-Known Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    I think Georges aoun will be the longest serving head of municipality in lebanon as long as wishes to run, thank you for blasting George aoun's rivals out of the water, by the way is he FPM????
     
    lebnan_lilkel

    lebnan_lilkel

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Very easy, the maronite association can create a fund to buy property, and then rent those properties to other Christian families, rent them to associations who need some temporary locales.. mech kel chi daroure ya3mlo menno masare.

    Solutions are aplenty, one only needs to look outside the box
    You are starting to sound like @walidos. Min allak innu elrabta is not doing it ? Elmir anonymous (who is the main christian leader following the buyouts ) ran out of steam. The mouzi developers are getting holy money from their respected countries and backers. Billions. The mouzis don't care about their poor mouzis worldwide, like the palos and syrians, only what they can screw up with other cultures. Places like Lebanon and the rest of the world. The Church is holding to its land well but needs politicians to keep theft and fraud at bay.

    Again this is an existence issue. The Druze do the same. No one complains about it because they bowed and called themself muslim.
     
    HannaTheCrusader

    HannaTheCrusader

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    I think Georges aoun will be the longest serving head of municipality in lebanon as long as wishes to run, thank you for blasting George aoun's rivals out of the water, by the way is he FPM????
    yes he is
     
    M

    motorhead

    Member
    تفوّق الطبيب اللبناني في إيطاليا محمد خليل، بطب الأعشاب، بعد أن تخصّص لسنوات طويلة بدرس الأعشاب في أهمّ جامعات إيطاليا
    This guy can't rent in Hadath. Heck, he can't even rent a lab to work in. Can't get funnier than that.
     
    modesty

    modesty

    Well-Known Member
    للذين ينتقدون رئيس بلدية الحدث، هل يمكنهم معرفة سبب عدم رجوع اهل هذه البلدات المسيحية الى ممتلكاتهم بعد ان هجروا من الضنية منذ ١٩٧٥
     
    modesty

    modesty

    Well-Known Member
    للمتلطين بكذبة العيش المشترك، هل يعرفون سبب عدم رد الفلسطينيين عقارات المسيحيين في المية ومية الذين استولوا عليها منذ بداية الحرب
     
    modesty

    modesty

    Well-Known Member
    لماذا لا ينتقدوا وليد جنبلاط فهو يمارس نفس السياسة في الشوف، الدرزي لا يبيع الا الدرزي والمسيحي اذا اراد البيع فلن يجد مشتري الا الدرزي، هل المسيحي مكسر عصا لكي يتعرض كل مدة بعد مدة للهجمات التي تدعي المدنية وهي بالحقيقة تخفي خطة لاحراجه وتحميله مسؤولية التنكر لعملية العيش المشترك التي لم يحترمها الآخرون من الاساس.
    لماذا يستقتل زعماء الطوائف للحفاظ على حصصهم الطائفية في مراكز وإدارات الدولة وبنفس الوقت يغض بعضهم الطرف عن الاجتياحات المقنعة لبعض المناطق، الا يعني ذلك انهم يطبقون مبدأ "ما هو لي هو لي وحدي وما هو لك هو لي ولك".
     
    !Aoune32

    !Aoune32

    Well-Known Member
    Mohammed Awwad and his fiancee, both Muslims, recently found an affordable apartment for rent online in the town of Hadat, southeast of Beirut.
    The 27-year-old journalist called the number and asked the owner when they could drop by to take a look. He was stunned by her response: Muslims are not allowed to settle in the town, she said.
    The apartment owner apologized to Awwad, saying she wouldn't mind renting to people of any sect but officials in the town of Hadat issued orders years ago that only Christians be allowed to buy and rent property from the town's Christian residents.
    The young Shiite Muslim man could not believe what he heard and asked his fiancee, Sarah Raad, to call the municipality and she, too, was told that the ban had been in place for years.
    Hadat is a small example of Lebanon's deeply rooted sectarian divisions that once led to a 15-year civil war that left more than 100,000 people dead. Christian communities feel under siege as Muslims, who tend to have higher birth rates, leave overcrowded areas for once predominantly Christian neighborhoods.
    "There are people who live in fear and feel threatened and this can be removed through (state) policies that make citizens equal," said Pierre Abi Saab, a Lebanese journalist and critic.
    Three decades ago Hadat was almost entirely Christian, but today it has a Muslim majority because the Muslim population expanded greatly between 1990, when the war ended, and 2010, when the ban was imposed. Since then, the Muslim population has hovered between 60% and 65%.
    The ban only applies to Christian property — a Muslim resident or landowner of Hadat is allowed to sell or rent his property to Muslims from outside the town or to whomever he wants.
    Hadat is the only area where such a ban is publicly announced. Local officials in Christian areas in central, eastern and southern Lebanon impose such bans in more discreet ways. In the predominantly Christian southern region of Jezzine, some local officials have changed the status of land in their villages from commercial to agricultural in order to prevent mass construction projects while in other villages and towns only locals are allowed to buy property.
    "As a Lebanese citizen I don't see that there is justification for fear and mixing with others is our salvation in Lebanon," said Abi Saab, deputy editor-in-chief of the daily al-Akhbar newspaper. He said it's unacceptable that Lebanese citizens cannot live wherever they want in the country.
    Hadat is on the edge of an area known as Dahiyeh, Beirut's heavily populated Shiite southern suburbs that is a stronghold of Hizbullah.
    Hadat, along with other nearby areas, saw tens of thousands of Shiite Muslims move in over the years, raising fears among some of the country's Christians.
    Lebanon, a country of about 5 million, has a very delicate sectarian balance between its 18 religious sects. The last census was conducted in Lebanon in 1932, during which Christians were the majority but over the decades their numbers have been declining because of slower birth rates and more immigration. Today, Christians make up nearly a third of the population, while the two other thirds are almost equally split between Shiites and Sunnis.
    "When he says Muslims are not allowed to rent property he means that he does not want to see Muslims," Awwad said, referring to Hadat Mayor George Aoun.
    Interior Minister Raya al-Hassan denounced the town's policy as unconstitutional.
    Aoun strongly defended his decision, noting it was made in 2010, shortly after he was elected to the post. He said at the end of Lebanon's civil war in 1990, Hadat was a purely Christian town but by 2010, tens of thousands of Muslims, many of them Shiites from Dahiyeh, moved in.
    "We are telling every Christian to be proud of his or her village. Live here, work here and raise your children here. We are an exemplary village for coexistence," he said. Asked whether his decision violates the constitution, which allows any Lebanese citizen to settle and own property anywhere in Lebanon, Aoun denied it, saying the proof is that Hadat is 60% Muslim.
    "Every village should preserve itself. Every Shiite village should preserve its Shiite nature, every Christian village should preserve its Christian nature and every Sunni village should preserve its Sunni nature. We want to preserve our village or what remains of it," Aoun said in an interview in his office, which is decorated with a giant framed map of Hadat.
    The mayor has received a barrage of criticism recently on social media and on local TV stations that describe his decision as "racist and discriminatory."
    In response, hundreds of supporters marched in Hadat supporting the mayor's decision over the weekend. Aoun told the crowd that he will commit to the ban until "doomsday."
    Christians once dominated Lebanon's politics until the 1989 Taef agreement, named after the Saudi city of Taef where it was signed, that ended the 1975-90 civil war. The agreement divided Cabinet and parliament seats as well as senior government jobs, equally between Muslims and Christians. The agreement also removed powers from the Christian president and gave them to Cabinet.
    According to Lebanon's power-sharing system since independence from France in 1943, the president must be a Maronite Christian, the prime minister a Sunni and the parliament speaker a Shiite.
    Hadat's municipality is dominated by members of President Michel Aoun's nationalist Free Patriotic Movement, which has been leading a campaign against Syrian refugees in the country calling for their return to safe areas in war-torn Syria.
    Two years ago, Hadat's municipality banned Syrians from working in the town, becoming one of the first areas to do so in Lebanon. Walking through the streets of Hadat, no Syrians can be seen unlike in other parts of Lebanon and shop owners boast that they only hire Lebanese.
    Hadat resident George Asmar invited a reporter into his clothes shop near a church and proudly pointed to a woman who works for him, saying "she is one of our Shiite sisters." But Asmar said he supported the mayor because the ban on Muslims owning or renting property in the town is preserving the town's identity.
    "The decision of the municipality is very good because we want to keep our sons in Hadat," Asmar said. "It is good to keep our sons, to live with us rather than travel."
     
    !Aoune32

    !Aoune32

    Well-Known Member
    SIDON, Lebanon: In light of the increased scrutiny on various municipalities’ restrictions on renting property, which critics allege try to keep Muslims from moving in, Sidon’s Greek Catholic bishop has spoken out against “isolationist” mindsets in Christian communities in the south. “Anyone who speaks the language of isolationism, he is outside the diocese - whether Greek Orthodox or Maronite,” Bishop Elie Haddad said Wednesday during a graduation ceremony at Lycee St. Nicolas in Ain al-Mir, between Sidon and Jezzine cities.
    The comments come as so-called property bans have come under fire in recent weeks after a Facebook post went viral, in which a young couple recounted how they had been forbidden from renting property in the Baabda town of Hadath because they were Muslim.

    The town’s mayor, George Aoun, told The Daily Star at the time that the municipality had prevented Christians from selling or renting their property to non-Christians since 2010, citing concerns of demographic change. But Aoun argued that the restrictions did not constitute a ban.


    Look at this dhimmi :)
    Some of these bishops need to be changed.
     
    Ice Tea

    Ice Tea

    Active Member
    SIDON, Lebanon: In light of the increased scrutiny on various municipalities’ restrictions on renting property, which critics allege try to keep Muslims from moving in, Sidon’s Greek Catholic bishop has spoken out against “isolationist” mindsets in Christian communities in the south. “Anyone who speaks the language of isolationism, he is outside the diocese - whether Greek Orthodox or Maronite,” Bishop Elie Haddad said Wednesday during a graduation ceremony at Lycee St. Nicolas in Ain al-Mir, between Sidon and Jezzine cities.
    The comments come as so-called property bans have come under fire in recent weeks after a Facebook post went viral, in which a young couple recounted how they had been forbidden from renting property in the Baabda town of Hadath because they were Muslim.

    The town’s mayor, George Aoun, told The Daily Star at the time that the municipality had prevented Christians from selling or renting their property to non-Christians since 2010, citing concerns of demographic change. But Aoun argued that the restrictions did not constitute a ban.


    Look at this dhimmi :)
    Some of these bishops need to be changed.

    Lol someone tell him that most Palestinian and Syrian Christians were also Melkite Catholics who also tried to coexiste with their Muslim 'brothers' and see how that ended up for them
     
    !Aoune32

    !Aoune32

    Well-Known Member
    Lol someone tell him that most Palestinian and Syrian Christians were also Melkite Catholics who also tried to coexiste with their Muslim 'brothers' and see how that ended up for them
    chou badak fi hayda?
    2eltelak he is a dhimmi!
     
    Jo

    Jo

    Administrator
    Master Penguin
    رئيس بلدية الحدت جورج عون ينفي الشائعات التي يجري تداولها عبر مواقع التواصل الاجتماعي عن توجيه البلدية انذارات بالاخلاء لعائلات مسلمة تعيش ضمن نطاقها
     
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