Armenian Genocide remembrance day - April 24, 2015

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  • light-in-dark

    light-in-dark

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    Plz give me a break and tell me that you don't believe this imperialist.
    In all times, the stronger and the powerful write the history and you are the mostly one who knows that.
    What Israel is trying now to tell the whole world about the bad Palestinians who are throwing missiles to destroy its civilization. What about Hizbalaah comploting to capture the 2 soldiers at lebanese border in 2006, is the right example.
    I will not tell you that Armenians are saints like Hizbalaah and Palestinians. So we can say that some truth is in this article but not all the truth. What is happening these days in Syria or in el jir7 el 3arabi is also the living proof for all of us. So whatever USA, UK, France, Turkey, Russia, China nowadays Saudi Arabia and Iran will tell us the truth, I will doubt about the old and the new imperialists!!!! They still rule us like sheep.
     
    Indie

    Indie

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    A century on, Lebanon rediscovers deadly famine

    Beirut (AFP) - Lebanon is rediscovering a century-old tragedy that most had forgotten -- a devastating famine, caused by blockades and a locust infestation, that killed a third of its population.

    From 1915 to 1918, in the midst of World War I and before modern-day Lebanon existed, between 150,000 and 200,000 people died of malnutrition and disease, according to estimates by historians.

    Those who survived the famine are long gone, but recently unearthed archives offer chilling testimonies of a time when men, women, and children fed themselves on tree bark or died by the side of the road.

    This famine "was the biggest catastrophe in the history of Lebanon. Even the civil war (1975-1990) did not reach this magnitude", historian Youssef Mouawad told AFP.

    It hit hardest for the 450,000 residents of then Ottoman-controlled Mount Lebanon which would become in 1920 the core of modern-day Lebanon.

    The famine indirectly led to Lebanon's expansion. Agricultural areas like the eastern Bekaa Valley were tacked on to Mount Lebanon and port cities to guarantee the viability of the young republic.

    This year, historian Christian Taoutel and Father Pierre Wittouck released a book compiling the previously unpublished French chronicles of Jesuit priests during the famine.

    "The Lebanese people in the turmoil of the Great War of 1914-1918" contains harrowing accounts rarely discussed in Lebanon, where the great famine is covered in just two paragraphs in schoolbooks.

    People "sank to the ground, vomiting blood", the book quotes a witness as saying. The bodies of children "were thrown among piles of rubbish".


    - Rats and cannibalism -

    In one of the diaries, a priest describes how in 1917 he came across the bodies of a widow and her 10-year-old son who had been dead for three days.

    "The rats... had gnawed at their ears and cheeks, and the little one's belly was open," he wrote.



    The book also relates stories of cannibalism, including the case of a man who had killed his children aged eight and 10 to feed himself.

    "The great Turkish reformist Halide Edip... said she wouldn't dare sleep in Beirut anymore because she would hear voices screaming 'juan, juan' (I'm hungry, in Arabic) all night," said Mouawad.

    The famine was the result of a series of factors.

    "The mountainous terrain of Mount Lebanon could only feed its population four months out of the year," said historian Issam Khalifeh.

    The situation worsened when "Allied forces imposed a blockade" in the Mediterranean to cut off supplies to the Ottomans, he told AFP.

    But it was the land blockade ordered by high Ottoman military ruler Djemal Pasha that truly choked off Mount Lebanon, populated mostly by Maronite Christians protected by France.

    The Ottomans feared the Maronites would support the Allies in the war "so they had to starve them before they were armed", said Khalifeh, a professor at the Lebanese University.

    Lebanon's woes did not stop there.

    In 1915, "the year of the locust", hordes of insects "devoured everything", Khalifeh said.

    The Ottomans also requisitioned crops and pack animals to support their war effort, Mouawad said.

    - 'Dead are my people' -

    Mouawad said these painful years were obliterated in the minds of people because they brought up memories of shame and guilt.

    "Dying of hunger isn't heroic. It's not like dying defending your village or in the trenches," he said.

    Some Lebanese families made fortunes by reselling stockpiled food at exorbitant prices, Mouawad said.

    "Women sold their bodies for a piece of bread, men sold their land for an orange."

    Cholera and typhoid epidemics spread, emptying out entire villages.

    The famine largely fell out of Lebanon's collective memory and official history, in part because it affected Christians more than Muslims and so did not serve as a unifying force for the young republic.

    Rare pictures of the tragedy were taken by Ibrahim Naoum Kanaan, who led a charitable relief programme in Mount Lebanon and who risked his life to document the horror.

    His shocking images -- a skeletal woman devouring a morsel of bread, emaciated corpses -- are a "historical treasure", said his grandson Emile Issa el-Khoury.

    "My grandfather was an unwitting hero and provided evidence of this tragedy."

    The famine has lived on in Lebanese literature, including in "The Bread", a novel by Toufic Youssef Awwad, and in "Dead are my people", a poem by Kahlil Gibran.

    "They died silently, for humanity had closed its ears to their cry," Gibran wrote.

    A century on, Lebanon rediscovers deadly famine - Yahoo News
     
    DLT

    DLT

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    A century on, Lebanon rediscovers deadly famine

    Beirut (AFP) - Lebanon is rediscovering a century-old tragedy that most had forgotten -- a devastating famine, caused by blockades and a locust infestation, that killed a third of its population.

    From 1915 to 1918, in the midst of World War I and before modern-day Lebanon existed, between 150,000 and 200,000 people died of malnutrition and disease, according to estimates by historians.

    Those who survived the famine are long gone, but recently unearthed archives offer chilling testimonies of a time when men, women, and children fed themselves on tree bark or died by the side of the road.

    This famine "was the biggest catastrophe in the history of Lebanon. Even the civil war (1975-1990) did not reach this magnitude", historian Youssef Mouawad told AFP.

    It hit hardest for the 450,000 residents of then Ottoman-controlled Mount Lebanon which would become in 1920 the core of modern-day Lebanon.

    The famine indirectly led to Lebanon's expansion. Agricultural areas like the eastern Bekaa Valley were tacked on to Mount Lebanon and port cities to guarantee the viability of the young republic.

    This year, historian Christian Taoutel and Father Pierre Wittouck released a book compiling the previously unpublished French chronicles of Jesuit priests during the famine.

    "The Lebanese people in the turmoil of the Great War of 1914-1918" contains harrowing accounts rarely discussed in Lebanon, where the great famine is covered in just two paragraphs in schoolbooks.

    People "sank to the ground, vomiting blood", the book quotes a witness as saying. The bodies of children "were thrown among piles of rubbish".


    - Rats and cannibalism -

    In one of the diaries, a priest describes how in 1917 he came across the bodies of a widow and her 10-year-old son who had been dead for three days.

    "The rats... had gnawed at their ears and cheeks, and the little one's belly was open," he wrote.



    The book also relates stories of cannibalism, including the case of a man who had killed his children aged eight and 10 to feed himself.

    "The great Turkish reformist Halide Edip... said she wouldn't dare sleep in Beirut anymore because she would hear voices screaming 'juan, juan' (I'm hungry, in Arabic) all night," said Mouawad.

    The famine was the result of a series of factors.

    "The mountainous terrain of Mount Lebanon could only feed its population four months out of the year," said historian Issam Khalifeh.

    The situation worsened when "Allied forces imposed a blockade" in the Mediterranean to cut off supplies to the Ottomans, he told AFP.

    But it was the land blockade ordered by high Ottoman military ruler Djemal Pasha that truly choked off Mount Lebanon, populated mostly by Maronite Christians protected by France.

    The Ottomans feared the Maronites would support the Allies in the war "so they had to starve them before they were armed", said Khalifeh, a professor at the Lebanese University.

    Lebanon's woes did not stop there.

    In 1915, "the year of the locust", hordes of insects "devoured everything", Khalifeh said.

    The Ottomans also requisitioned crops and pack animals to support their war effort, Mouawad said.

    - 'Dead are my people' -

    Mouawad said these painful years were obliterated in the minds of people because they brought up memories of shame and guilt.

    "Dying of hunger isn't heroic. It's not like dying defending your village or in the trenches," he said.

    Some Lebanese families made fortunes by reselling stockpiled food at exorbitant prices, Mouawad said.

    "Women sold their bodies for a piece of bread, men sold their land for an orange."

    Cholera and typhoid epidemics spread, emptying out entire villages.

    The famine largely fell out of Lebanon's collective memory and official history, in part because it affected Christians more than Muslims and so did not serve as a unifying force for the young republic.

    Rare pictures of the tragedy were taken by Ibrahim Naoum Kanaan, who led a charitable relief programme in Mount Lebanon and who risked his life to document the horror.

    His shocking images -- a skeletal woman devouring a morsel of bread, emaciated corpses -- are a "historical treasure", said his grandson Emile Issa el-Khoury.

    "My grandfather was an unwitting hero and provided evidence of this tragedy."

    The famine has lived on in Lebanese literature, including in "The Bread", a novel by Toufic Youssef Awwad, and in "Dead are my people", a poem by Kahlil Gibran.

    "They died silently, for humanity had closed its ears to their cry," Gibran wrote.

    A century on, Lebanon rediscovers deadly famine - Yahoo News
    This deserve a thread of its own.
     
    Indie

    Indie

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    Armenian Genocide memorial cross placed underwater in Lebanese coast

    Under the patronage of the Embassy of the Republic of Armenia in Lebanon, and the Armenian Genocide Centenary Central Committee of Lebanon, and His Holiness Nercess Bedros 19th Patriarch of the Armenian Catholic Church in Beirut Lebanon, Octopus Team diving club owned by Antranig Haddad a descent of the Armenian Genocide survivor, organized The placement of An Armenian Genocide Memorial Cross beneath the sea, dedicated to the 100th Anniversary of the Armenian Genocide on Sunday the 10th of May, at 10 am, near Green beach resort in Beirut.

    The Armenian cross has been placed 35 meters deep in the Mediterranean Sea, dedicated to the Memory of those Armenians who perished drowning in rivers and seas during the Armenian Genocide, escaping rape, abduction and torturous death by Turkish soldiers in 1915.

    Armenian Genocide memorial cross placed underwater in Lebanese coast - Հորիզոն շաբաթաթերթ - Horizon Weekly
     
    kmarthe

    kmarthe

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    مجموعات من المسلمين الأتراك ذات الأصول الأرمنية يعودون لجذورهم المسيحية ويتعمدون
    (كتب : فادى خليل – الاقباط اليوم)

    أكدت صحيفة “أغوس” الصادرة في العاصمة التركية “اسطنبول” والناطقة باللغتين الأرمنية والتركية ، ان احدى الكنائس شهدت تعميد 12 شخصا من ارمن منطقة “ديرسيم” في ارمينيا الغربية بعد اكتشافهم لاصولهم الجذرية وحقيقة كونهم مسيحيون أرمن وليسوا مسلمون اتراك ، بعد ان اثبتوا ان اجدادهم تحولوا الي الإسلام قصرا دون قناعة خشية تعرضهم للقتل عام 1905 ميلادية.

    وحسب الصحيفة ، تمت مراسيم المعودية في التاسع من مايو الحالي في كنيسة القديس ستيبانوس، ومنهم بعض المتزوجين الذين أعادوا زواجهم من جديد وفقا للشريعة المسيحية.

    وفي مقابلة لموقع لينغا ، مع الدكتورة جورجيت اواكيان، حول الذكرى المئوية للمذبحة الأرمنية، أكدت ان الكثير من ابناء واحفاد الارمن الذين اجبروا بالقوة على التحوّل للاسلام، بدأوا يدركون حقيقة تاريخيهم ويتحولوا بمجموعات الى المسيحية، منهم من زار مطرانية الارمن في القدس القديمة للعماد واعلان ايمانه المسيحي.​


    Eh oui, ما بني على باطل هو باطل...
     
    HannaTheCrusader

    HannaTheCrusader

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    Freed at last from the yoke
     
    Robin Hood

    Robin Hood

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    مجموعات من المسلمين الأتراك ذات الأصول الأرمنية يعودون لجذورهم المسيحية ويتعمدون

    (كتب : فادى خليل – الاقباط اليوم)

    أكدت صحيفة “أغوس” الصادرة في العاصمة التركية “اسطنبول” والناطقة باللغتين الأرمنية والتركية ، ان احدى الكنائس شهدت تعميد 12 شخصا من ارمن منطقة “ديرسيم” في ارمينيا الغربية بعد اكتشافهم لاصولهم الجذرية وحقيقة كونهم مسيحيون أرمن وليسوا مسلمون اتراك ، بعد ان اثبتوا ان اجدادهم تحولوا الي الإسلام قصرا دون قناعة خشية تعرضهم للقتل عام 1905 ميلادية.

    وحسب الصحيفة ، تمت مراسيم المعودية في التاسع من مايو الحالي في كنيسة القديس ستيبانوس، ومنهم بعض المتزوجين الذين أعادوا زواجهم من جديد وفقا للشريعة المسيحية.

    وفي مقابلة لموقع لينغا ، مع الدكتورة جورجيت اواكيان، حول الذكرى المئوية للمذبحة الأرمنية، أكدت ان الكثير من ابناء واحفاد الارمن الذين اجبروا بالقوة على التحوّل للاسلام، بدأوا يدركون حقيقة تاريخيهم ويتحولوا بمجموعات الى المسيحية، منهم من زار مطرانية الارمن في القدس القديمة للعماد واعلان ايمانه المسيحي.


    Eh oui, ما بني على باطل هو باطل...
    I hope they didn't join the Armenian Evangelical Church, sorry but I can't like Evangelicals. :p
     
    kmarthe

    kmarthe

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    I hope they didn't join the Armenian Evangelical Church, sorry but I can't like Evangelicals. :p
    Armenians are mostly Orthodox with a decent Catholic portion. Whatever, better than being in something they don't believe in with conviction.
     
    Indie

    Indie

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    Movie about the Armenian genocide by Turkish film maker Fatih Akin. Must see.

     
    Indie

    Indie

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    Another movie about the Genocide, this time an Armenian production, with a strong message at the end, that I won't give up as not to tuin the movie for those who want to watch it.

     
    Indie

    Indie

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    Indie

    Indie

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    Kim Kardashian Attacks Armenian Genocide Denial In Full-Page Ad

    Kim Kardashian blasted deniers of the Armenian genocide in a full-page ad in Saturday's New York Times.

    Kardashian has been a passionate advocate for remembering the tragedy, including urging President Obama to formally recognize its occurrence. She continued her activism by blasting the Wall Street Journal for publishing an ad that denied the genocide. Traditionally, genocide deniers say that fewer people died and that the tragedy was self-inflicted.

    "My family and I are no strangers to BS in the press," Kardashian wrote. "We’ve learned to brush it off. Lies make good headlines, good headlines make great covers, great covers sell magazines. But when I heard about this full-page ad that ran in the Wall Street Journal denying the Armenian genocide, I couldn’t just brush it off."

    She further cited the lack of accountability from Turkey's government following the genocide. Kardashian draws a line from the public's dismissal of the genocide and the planning and commission of the Holocaust.

    Read the full ad below.
    View image on Twitter


    Kim Kardashian NYT Ad Armenian Genocide Denial WSJ
     
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