Armenian Genocide remembrance day - April 24, 2015

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  • Aoune32!

    Aoune32!

    Well-Known Member
    Full respect to the Armenian population. One who fled to Lebanon, number around 200K. Have never fought in the war and lived through it all. One who has never lost faith and hold their head high. Well done!!
    Some should learn from our brothers!!
     
    Jo

    Jo

    Administrator
    Master Penguin
    Monument of Gratitude from Armenian people to the Arab people (Yerevan, Armenia)

     
    Robin Hood

    Robin Hood

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    This also happens to coincide with Holocaust Memorial Day.
     
    AtheistForJesus

    AtheistForJesus

    Well-Known Member
    Do you people never tire of making false claims and attempting cheap shots?

    Since when is Trump my friend? And you really found no better comment to make in a thread commemorating a genocide?
    I wasn't addressing you, sweetie :) I know you're not a fan. I was addressing FPMers who think Trump is the savior of Christians.
     
    light-in-dark

    light-in-dark

    Legendary Member
    I wasn't addressing you, sweetie :) I know you're not a fan. I was addressing FPMers who think Trump is the savior of Christians.
    Plz don't generalize. Don't give FPMers tags or labels. The Fpmers don't think that Trump is the Savior of Christians nor the Muslim fpmers think as well that. FPMers are only Lebanese like you. Our Savior Jesus Christ has come once it is enough, we are waiting for his second ans final coming don't know when???

    No american or westerner decider is for thinking about any Christians or Christianity come and see. Apparently, they are saying so but in reality money is the motor of every decision.
     
    Iron Maiden

    Iron Maiden

    Paragon of Bacon
    Orange Room Supporter
    little by little, big old kebab will be pushed to admit it

    Ankara condamne «fermement» la reconnaissance du génocide arménien

    La Turquie a "fermement" condamné aujourd'hui la reconnaissance par les députés néerlandais du génocide des Arméniens sous l'Empire ottoman il y a un siècle, faisant monter d'un cran les tensions déjà vives entre Ankara et La Haye.

    "Nous condamnons fermement la décision prise aujourd'hui par la chambre des représentants des Pays-Bas de reconnaître comme génocide les événements de 1915", a déclaré le ministère turc des Affaires étrangères dans un communiqué.

    for the english speaking folk, the netherland's parliament recognizes the atrocities of 1915 by turks and kurds as genocide
     
    Indie

    Indie

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    little by little, big old kebab will be pushed to admit it

    Ankara condamne «fermement» la reconnaissance du génocide arménien

    La Turquie a "fermement" condamné aujourd'hui la reconnaissance par les députés néerlandais du génocide des Arméniens sous l'Empire ottoman il y a un siècle, faisant monter d'un cran les tensions déjà vives entre Ankara et La Haye.

    "Nous condamnons fermement la décision prise aujourd'hui par la chambre des représentants des Pays-Bas de reconnaître comme génocide les événements de 1915", a déclaré le ministère turc des Affaires étrangères dans un communiqué.

    for the english speaking folk, the netherland's parliament recognizes the atrocities of 1915 by turks and kurds as genocide
    Apparently, Israel wants to officially recognize the genocide as well...to spite Turkey. Israel should have recognized a long time ago, given their history. But better late than never.
     
    Indie

    Indie

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Turkish genealogy database fascinates, frightens Turks

    Fehim Tastekin

    The government has made Turkey’s population registers public for the first time, identifying ethnic Armenians and other minorities, and excited Turks immediately crashed the system.

    During the days when Turkey still hoped to join the European Union, its people were becoming willing to question their ethnic and religious ancestry. Since then, the country has reverted to a time when people were disgraced and denigrated, with the government’s blessings, as “crypto-Armenians."

    Hrant Dink was the editor of the Armenian-language newspaper Agos in 2004 when he wrote that Sabiha Gokcen, the first female military pilot of the Turkish Republic, was of Armenian parentage. Because of this and other articles he penned, Dink found himself the subject of investigation by the Justice Ministry. He was assassinated in 2007 for reasons thought to be related to his strong support for Armenian causes.

    Dink's story illustrates why population registers in Turkey were kept secret until recently. The topic has always been a sensitive issue for the state. The confidentiality of data that identifies people's lineage was considered a national security issue.

    There were two main reasons for all this secrecy: to conceal that scores of Armenians, Syriacs, Greeks and Jews had converted to Islam, and to avoid any debate about "Turkishness.” Its definition, “anyone who is attached to the Turkish state as a citizen," was enshrined in the constitution as part of the philosophy of Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, the founding father of the Turkish Republic and its first president.

    For a long time, the official policy was that Turks formed a cohesive ethnic identity in Turkey. But less than two weeks ago, on Feb. 8, population registers were officially opened to the public via an online genealogy database. The system crashed quickly under the demand. Some people who had always boasted of their "pure" Turkish ancestry were shocked to learn they actually had other ethnic and religious roots.

    On the darker side, comments such as “Crypto-Armenians, Greek and Jews in the country will now be exposed” and “Traitors will finally learn their lineage” became commonplace on social media.
    Genealogy has always been a popular topic of conversation in Turkish society, but also a tool of social and political division. Families often acknowledged in private that their lineage was Armenian or that a long-dead relative was a convert to Islam, but those conversations were kept secret. Being a convert in Turkey carried a stigma that could not be erased.

    Ethnic Armenian columnist Hayko Bagdat told Al-Monitor, “During the 1915 genocide, along with mass conversions, there were also thousands of children in exile. Those who could reach foreign missionaries were spirited abroad. Some were grabbed by roaming gangs during their escape and made into sex slaves and laborers. The society is not yet ready to deal with this reality. Imagine that a man who had served as the director of religious affairs of this country [Lutfi Dogan] was the brother of someone who was the Armenian patriarch [Sinozk Kalustyan].”

    He went on, “Kalustyan, who returned to Turkey from Beirut in 1961, was remembered as a saint in the Turkish Armenian Patriarchate and as someone who had served in the most difficult times after 1915. During the genocide, his mother sent the children away and converted to Islam. Later she married [a man called] Dogan, who was of high social standing, and had two girls and a boy. The boy was Lutfi Dogan. When the mother, who was then with the Nationalist Action Party branch in Malatya province, died, his uncle came in priest garb from Beirut to attend the funeral. Nobody could say anything.”

    The mindset of society was starkly clear when President Recep Tayyip Erdogan once complained, “We are accused of being Jews, Armenians or Greeks.”

    There were those who feared that data obtained from population registers could be used to stigmatize the famous and used for political lynching campaigns. After the database went down, they spoke out against its restoration. One of them was Tayfun Atay, a columnist for Turkey’s daily Cumhuriyet.
    “I was advised in a friendly manner not to admit that I am a Georgian. That was the lightest form of pressure. What about those who risk learning they are of Armenian ancestry or a convert? Just think: You think you are a red-blooded Turk but turn out to be a pure-blood Armenian. Imagine the societal repercussions,” he wrote Feb. 12.

    As the debate raged, the system suddenly came back online Feb. 14.

    Many Turks are questioning the timing of making this information available.

    “If they had done this a few years ago when we were [becoming more tolerant], conspiracy theories would not have been as strong as today, when the state behaves as though we are in a struggle for existence. This is how Turkey reinvigorates the spirit of the Independence War” to inspire patriotism and pro-government thinking, journalist Serdar Korucu told Al-Monitor.

    Those who oppose the system fear that a society already in a morass of racism will sink into it even further. Others, however, say that though reality might be shocking, couldn’t it be useful in eradicating racism?
    “Yes, definitely. Everyone in Turkey is curious about their ancestry. That is a fact,” Korucu responded. “Why is facing reality so hard?" He said of the Sabiha Gokcen story, "That turned the country upside down."

    Korucu believes data confidentiality is essential to prevent population registers from being misused as instruments of political defamation, but warned, “The state organs already know everything about us."
    In 2013, Agos reported that the government was secretly coding minorities in population registers: Greeks were 1, Armenians were 2 and Jews were 3. The covert classification of religious minorities was met with wide outrage.

    "What's worse is these facts emerge when it is time for a young man for report to military conscription. In short, there are those who know us better than we do. So why not tell us about it?” Korucu asked.

    “Population registers are dangerous. That is why Hrant Dink was murdered," the columnist Bagdat noted. "The director of the Genocide Museum in Yerevan told a delegation from Turkey [about] the three most-discussed issues by those who were able to escape. Armenians first tell us about the Muslims who helped them escape the genocide, then the Armenians who betrayed them and only then do they narrate their catastrophe. If we make public the names of Armenians who were forced to convert to Islam, their grandchildren will be in danger today.”

    He added, “This is how the situation is after 100 years: The Turkish state asked us to accept being Turks. Fine, let me say I am a Turk. Will I be given a public job? No. When I say, ‘No, I am an Armenian,’ I am treated as a terrorist. Nothing has changed. Opening of the population registers means nothing to me. How can we forget Yusuf Halacoglu, the director of the Historical Society of Turkey in 2007, who had bluntly threatened, ‘Don’t make me angry. I have a list of converts I can reveal down to their streets and homes.’ These words, by this man who later became a politician in the Nationalist Action Party, were a threat to Turkish politics.”

    Is the information in the now publicly accessible registers complete?

    Another ethnic Armenian, journalist Yervant Ozuzun, has doubts. ”We don’t know if anything changed. We know ethnic origins were marked with different codes in the register. We as Armenians were code No. 2. Has this changed? I don’t think so."

    Government officials aren't saying one way or the other.

    Turkish genealogy database fascinates, frightens Turks
     
    gramsci

    gramsci

    Legendary Member
    May their souls rest in peace...
    lebanese and Armenian share this sad memory , since both were victims to the ottoman fascism , and their brutality ..
    never forget the famine caused by the ottoman embargo against lebanon on 1915.. never forget the lebanese patriots excuted by jamal pasha in martyrs square in beirut ..
     
    Lebanese-Nationalist

    Lebanese-Nationalist

    Well-Known Member
    Do most people in Lebanon recognize the Armenian genocide?

    I've been to Tripoli and most people there don't
     
    IsaBells

    IsaBells

    All the jingle ladies, put your hands up!
    Orange Room Supporter
    I met an old Armenian woman two days ago at my friend's place, she's her grandma... We were talking about the situation in Armenia, the president resigning and the genocide... And then she told me what her parents went through! Fascinating stuff! Her mother's entire family was killed, she was the only survivor... Same thing with her father... They both relocated to the united states where they met and got married then decided to move to France... Then world war 2 happened! She was 8 years old when they fled Paris... The war ended they went back to Armenia then the Soviet union thing happened and they could no longer leave! then She met her husband, they got married and lived in a tiny studio apartment with 3 little girls! Then they managed to get back to France by selling everything they owned and have been here ever since! By the end of her story I was thinking to myself this woman is not only a direct descendent of genocide survivors but she has also lived through the worst period of human history, yet she managed to keep a smile on her face, and knit some hats for her great grandchildren! I admire her strength, resiliation and great spirit! May her parents' family members and others like them finally get the recognition they deserve!
     
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