Armpit Hair Is Trending

Do you shave your armpit hair?

  • I'm a man and I do

    Votes: 7 43.8%
  • I'm a man and I don't

    Votes: 7 43.8%
  • I'm a woman and I do

    Votes: 1 6.3%
  • I'm a woman and I don't

    Votes: 1 6.3%

  • Total voters
    16

Dalzi

Legendary Member
I was attending a seminar once and the lady giving the talk had long light armpit hair. I swear to God I lost focus on what she was saying at the shock sight of her moving her hands all around with that hair that she had obviously kept 'natural' all her life. I was sitting there thinking about armpit hair being exposed at an academic seminar on a hot summer's day and my thoughts went deeper into how it would be like for her husband.
 

Indie

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
Actually I find it disturbing and I can't help the feeling. Natural or not it's disturbing.

Because you're not used to seeing it. What I find disturbing are the reactions in this thread.

"Because disgust is partially a result of social conditioning, there are differences among different cultures in the objects of disgust. Americans "are more likely to link feelings of disgust to actions that limit a person’s rights or degrade a person’s dignity" while Japanese people "are more likely to link feelings of disgust to actions that frustrate their integration into the social world"."

Disgust - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

Dalzi

Legendary Member
Because you're not used to seeing it. What I find disturbing are the reactions in this thread.

"Because disgust is partially a result of social conditioning, there are differences among different cultures in the objects of disgust. Americans "are more likely to link feelings of disgust to actions that limit a person’s rights or degrade a person’s dignity" while Japanese people "are more likely to link feelings of disgust to actions that frustrate their integration into the social world"."

Disgust - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Culture has a lot to do with how we perceive beauty but so does taste. If some find it attractive others don't, so if he says I like smooth legs (and armpits) on a woman and she says I like hairy legs on a man lol that doesn't mean either's being sexist, it's a preference.
 

Dalzi

Legendary Member
The same as how it is for women :)
Talking of social conditioning, the older generation used to wax even their faces. I have an aunt in her 70s whose face shines because she doesn't let a hair grow lol She used to use the gum they bought from Syria in the past on her face. It's no wonder she shakes a little now with all those years of pulling on those nerves :p They ifentified hairy as ugly.
 

Indie

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
Culture has a lot to do with how we perceive beauty but so does taste. If some find it attractive others don't, so if he says I like smooth legs (and armpits) on a woman and she says I like hairy legs on a man lol that doesn't mean either's being sexist, it's a preference.

Yes. At the same time, taste is heavily influenced by culture (among other things).

As I said before, it's one thing to say you have certain preferences, it's another to call those who don't fit your criteria of beauty repulsive. A lot of the exaggerated posturing on the part of men over women's body hair is about shaming and control. Let's differentiate that kind of behaviour from simple and harmless statements of preferences.
 

Dirty Dragon

Well-Known Member
I was attending a seminar once and the lady giving the talk had long light armpit hair. I swear to God I lost focus on what she was saying at the shock sight of her moving her hands all around with that hair that she had obviously kept 'natural' all her life. I was sitting there thinking about armpit hair being exposed at an academic seminar on a hot summer's day and my thoughts went deeper into how it would be like for her husband.

Reminds me of a time back in school. We had an XXL sized female supervisor who came to class the day before summer break. Up her arm goes to enthusiastically wave goodbye with a big hearty smile on her face, revealing one of the biggest jungles I have ever seen on a man or woman.

If someone had snapped a picture of the class in that moment it would have been priceless. Must have been a exaggurated version of this:

surprised-crowd-370x229.jpg
 

Dirty Dragon

Well-Known Member
As I said before, it's one thing to say you have certain preferences, it's another to call those who don't fit your criteria of beauty repulsive..

Attraction and repulsion are at opposite sides on the same line. Can't have one without the other.
 

Indie

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
Attraction and repulsion are at opposite sides on the same line. Can't have one without the other.

That line has more than two points.

Part of wisdom is to think beyond your primitive instincts. There is a process between a first, involuntary thought, and the act of typing a post. And you control what happens in between.
 

Dalzi

Legendary Member
Reminds me of a time back in school. We had an XXL sized female supervisor who came to class the day before summer break. Up her arm goes to enthusiastically wave goodbye with a big hearty smile on her face, revealing one of the biggest jungles I have ever seen on a man or woman.

If someone had snapped a picture of the class in that moment it would have been priceless. Must have been a exaggurated version of this:

surprised-crowd-370x229.jpg
lol Now imagine seeing that at the start of a class where you're expected to be paying attention to what is being said not seen. Aside from being considered unattractive by many it's also non-hygienic. Body odor is odorless (strange name) but once it is released out of the body and comes in contact with microorganisms living on the surface of the skin it smells. Keeping the surface clean is the condition for smelling nice, now imagine all that dwells and prospers on that hair and the diffuculty she'd face wanting to remove them out of their habitat without knocking down the house itself.

I don't know why but men with armpit hair don't smell like women with armpit hair. Maybe it's hormones.

God have mercy on our noses lol The talk itself is repulsive.
 
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Dalzi

Legendary Member
Yes. At the same time, taste is heavily influenced by culture (among other things).

As I said before, it's one thing to say you have certain preferences, it's another to call those who don't fit your criteria of beauty repulsive. A lot of the exaggerated posturing on the part of men over women's body hair is about shaming and control. Let's differentiate that kind of behaviour from simple and harmless statements of preferences.
What's the difference between saying 'it's repulsive' and 'it's unattractive'? They mean the same thing. If it doesn't drag me in then it pushes me away, two opposites.
 

Indie

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
What's the difference between saying 'it's repulsive' and 'it's unattractive'? They mean the same thing. If it doesn't drag me in then it pushes me away, two opposites.

There is a difference between repulsive (makes you want to avoid / run away in disgust), and unattractive (doesn't attract you towards it but doesn't push you away either). The former leaves no space for respect, acceptance, and coexistence, while the latter does.
 

Dirty Dragon

Well-Known Member
That line has more than two points.

Yes, and it is up to each person to decide for themselves where on the line they stand / want to stand.

A lot of the exaggerated posturing on the part of men over women's body hair is about shaming and control.

Social conditioning goes both ways. Expression of repulsion is a form social pressure, and expressions of disapproving shock and aggression is a stronger form of social pressure.

Part of wisdom is to think beyond your primitive instincts. There is a process between a first, involuntary thought, and the act of typing a post.

Indeed:
Do you guys realize how brainwashed you are?
If women were as sexist as men...
Wow. Just. Wow.
... but to call something natural "repulsive" is so ignorant.
This behaviour is vile. You guys have a lot to learn about human connection.
...
etc

Getting repulsed based on knee-jerk reaction, or trying to police other's dispositions based on knee-jerk reaction. Let the reader judge which is worse :)
 

Dalzi

Legendary Member
There is a difference between repulsive (makes you want to avoid / run away in disgust), and unattractive (doesn't attract you towards it but doesn't push you away either). The former leaves no space for respect, acceptance, and coexistence, while the latter does.
Not necessarily. I still respect the lecturer with hairy armpits and enjoy her company. As long as you are not romatically involved with what you find repulsive, then you don't need to run away.
 

eLad

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
this thread reminds of a joke:

A good looking woman walks into a bar wearing a tube top. She raises her hand to signal the bartender for a beer, revealing that she does not shave her armpits.

Meanwhile, a sloppy drunk on the other side of the bar signals the bartender, "Buy that ballerina over there a drink on me."

The bartender replies, "What makes you think she's a ballerina?"

"Because," answers the drunken man, "any chick that can lift her leg that high has GOT to be a ballerina."

lol
 

eLad

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
HISTORY OF HAIR REMOVAL

ANCIENT EGYPT
The Egyptians may have been the forerunners of many beauty rituals, but they invested the most time into hair removal. Women of ancient Egypt removed all of their body hair, including that on their heads, with tweezers (made from seashells), pumice stones, or early beeswax and sugar based waxes.


ROMAN EMPIRE
During the Roman Empire, the lack of body hair was considered a sign of the classes. Wealthy women and men used razors made from flints, tweezers, creams, and stones to remove excess hair. In fact, even pubic hair was considered uncivilized which is why many famous statues and paintings of Grecian women are depicted hairless.


MIDDLE AGES
Just like Cleopatra was a trendsetter in her time, so too was Queen Elizabeth 1 during the Middle Ages. She set the precedence for hair removal amongst women, who followed her lead by removing it from their faces, but not their bodies. The fashion of this era was to remove eyebrows and hair from the forehead (to make it appear larger), which women did by using walnut oil, or bandages soaked in amonia (which they got from their feline pets) and vinegar.


1700S
The late 18th century ushered in a more civilized approach to hair removal. While European and American women didn’t take too much consideration into it, Jean Jacques Perret, a French barber, created the first straight razor for men in 1760 which was used by some women.


1800S
By 1844, Dr. Gouraud had created one of the first depilatory creams called Poudre Subtile. Soon after, in 1880, King Camp Gillette created the first modern day razor for men and thus a revolution was born. However, it would be another three decades before a razor specifically marketed for women would appear.


EARLY 1900S
In 1915, Gillette created the first razor specifically for women, the Milady Decolletée. The early 1900’s also saw ads for depilatory cream hit the masses. In 1907 an ad for X-Bazin Depilatory Powder began circulating, promising to remove ‘humiliating growth of hair on the face, neck, and arms’. A decade later, a leading women's fashion magazine ran an ad featuring a woman with her arms raised and her armpits bare, the first of it's kind.


1940S
Remington released the first electric women’s razor in 1940 after the success of a male version. Due to a wartime shortage of nylon, more products and techniques for hair removal hit the market as women were forced to go bare legged more often.


1950S
During the 1950s, hair removal became more publically accepted. Since many depilatory creams were still irritating to the skin, women relied on razors to shaver their legs and underarms and tweezers to groom and shape their eyebrows.


1960S
Wax strips made their début in the 1960s and quickly became the method of choice for removing unwanted hair under the arms and on legs. The first laser hair removal method hit the market in the mid-sixties, but was quickly abandoned due to its skin damaging tendencies.


1970S
Although electrolysis had been around for nearly a century, it became more reliable and safe in the 1970s with the development of transistorized equipment. The decade also saw a resurgence in the removal of bikini area hair as the swimsuit fad of the 1960s stuck around.


1980S-PRESENT
Today, most women rely on some form of hair removal in their everyday beauty routines, whether it is tweezing, shaving, waxing, or depilatory. Waxing bars, eyebrow threading studios, and electrolysis centers are at an all time high and continue to rise. New technologies in hair removal had made it one of the most popular beauty services out there.
 

Indie

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
Yes, and it is up to each person to decide for themselves where on the line they stand / want to stand.

Yes, technically everyone can decide between a whole range of stances from angelic to pure evil. Shaming, being judgemental and non-accepting, hypocrisy, ignorance and controlling behaviour all fall under this.

When people choose to mock, dehumanize, and humiliate others in the name of freedom of opinion and taste, they should be ready for the backlash.

Social conditioning goes both ways. Expression of repulsion is a form social pressure, and expressions of disapproving shock and aggression is a stronger form of social pressure.

So a guy beats someone up and the judge says: "you committed a crime and you are going to jail for a month." And the criminal says to the judge: "you deprived me of freedom for a month, you committed a crime too and it was even worse than mine." Yawn.


Indeed nothing. I stand by every one of my posts. They are not primitive outburst like freaking out over body hair, but legitimate criticism over a certain type of behaviour.

Getting repulsed based on knee-jerk reaction, or trying to police other's dispositions based on knee-jerk reaction. Let the reader judge which is worse :)

The only people policing anything are men policing women's bodies. And there is nothing "knee-jerky" about a woman pointing out this fact.
 

Indie

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
Not necessarily. I still respect the lecturer with hairy armpits and enjoy her company. As long as you are not romatically involved with what you find repulsive, then you don't need to run away.

You say you respect her, but you stopped paying attention to what she had to say because she didn't confirm to a certain societal standard of beauty. You stopped listening to what she had to say = ran away figuratively.
 
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