Arresting someone for a casual joke in private is something to be worried about

Abou Sandal

Abou Sandal

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
When it's in private
When it contains no insults

There is no way to incriminate such a joke. No way. Period.

However, a man just got arrested for such a joke. And that is a dangerous precedent. Something to be seriously worried about, especially that it was done to please hordes of outraged hypocrites, most of them only playing their sectarian outbidding, to please their sectarian crowds.

The danger is not much about freedom of expression, as much as it is about the complete capitulation of the judicial system and the rule of law, in front of the political power and an excessive rise of sectarianism.

In such case, sectarianism officially becomes the law.

Again...Something to be worried about.
 
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  • Libnene Qu7

    Libnene Qu7

    Super Ultra Senior Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    I am for absolute freedom of speech, including hateful and disgusting comments. Unfortunately, while our constitution protects freedom of speech (article 13), it only does so insofar as the law permits. Our freedom of the indiviual laws are archaic and misogynistic and require immediate update. Too bad that a typical MP's job in this country is to attend funerals, weddings, social events, and doing wastas for the sheep instead of writing bills and passing legislation.

    One thing to note here: all of the anti-FPM hordes who cried foul over the Mansouriyeh man's arrest due to his insults against the president and two FPM ministers, were pleading and crying like high hippies for freedom of speech. Now they want Asmar crucified and burned a la ISIS style. So much for principles of the anti-FPM sick minded retards.
     
    Rafidi

    Rafidi

    Legendary Member
    When it's in private
    When it contains no insults

    There is no way to incriminate such a joke. No way. Period.

    However, a man just got arrested for such a joke. And that is a dangerous precedent. Something to be seriously worried about, especially that it was done to please hordes of outraged hypocrites, most of them only playing their sectarian outbidding, to please their sectarian crowds.

    The danger is not much about freedom of expression, as much as it is about the complete capitulation of the judicial system and the rule of law, in front of the political power and an excessive rise of sectarianism.

    In such case, sectarianism officially becomes the law.

    Again...Something to be worried about.
    What happened and who was arrested and for what? Please give details.
     
    Isabella

    Isabella

    The queen of "Bazella"
    Orange Room Supporter
    Can someone explain what happened? Along with - if it would not get you arrested - the joke in question
     
    fidelio

    fidelio

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    It's also an indication as to how the system of respectability works in the popular perception.

    I'm absolutely certain that everyone in their lifetime have made worse jokes than Asmar's, the more heretical the merrier the joke, and most of the times ridiculing every known deity whether from the false gods or the true ones. But when the joke is public, outrage ensues and the horde demands to see blood. It doesn't matter if the person is an elected official, a representative or a plain comedian, people tend to hold a single person to a much higher standard than theirs when they are numerous and he is alone.

    People have inherent collective double standards, the political class behaves in the same fashion and follows the popular trend instead of redressing it, and thus gains more respectability. People as a collective mass, intuitively respect someone who mirrors their hypocrisy instead of calling it out. Respect comes cheap most of the times.
     
    Manifesto

    Manifesto

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    I think he's referring to this.

     
    Dark Angel

    Dark Angel

    Legendary Member
    When it's in private
    When it contains no insults

    There is no way to incriminate such a joke. No way. Period.

    However, a man just got arrested for such a joke. And that is a dangerous precedent. Something to be seriously worried about, especially that it was done to please hordes of outraged hypocrites, most of them only playing their sectarian outbidding, to please their sectarian crowds.

    The danger is not much about freedom of expression, as much as it is about the complete capitulation of the judicial system and the rule of law, in front of the political power and an excessive rise of sectarianism.

    In such case, sectarianism officially becomes the law.

    Again...Something to be worried about.
    agreed. the law has no jurisdiction over speech said in private. however we are spiraling down towards decadence, and there is no clear idea how that can be stopped or reversed. the law cannot force people to conduct themselves respectfully, but people should have a set of standards that should be far beyond the limits of what is required by civic laws which set the lowest common denominator.

    and though the guy should not be arrested nor face any jail time, he should resign his post, and his successor should be someone who conducts himself with grace and honor to nobly represent and safeguard the interests of the workers.

    the worst however is that the opposite might happen, he might be slapped on the wrist by the judicial system, and he will continue to serve in his post as if nothing has happened.

    the guy is one of the biggest rotten apples though, and there are many ways that he could be legally punished for fraud and other charges, and should either resign or be removed from his post.
     
    Manifesto

    Manifesto

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    agreed. the has no jurisdiction over private free speech. however we are spiraling down towards decadence, and there is no clear idea how that can be stopped or reversed. the law cannot force people to conduct themselves respectfully, but people should have a set of standards that should be far beyond the limits of what is required by civic laws which set the lowest common denominator.

    and though the guy should not be arrested nor face any jail time, he should resign his post, and his successor should be someone who conducts himself with grace and honor to nobly represent and safeguard the interests of the workers.

    the worst however is that the opposite might happen, he might be slapped on the wrist by the judicial system, and he will continue to serve in his post as if nothing has happened.

    the guy is one of the biggest rotten apples though, and there are many ways that he could be legally punished for fraud and other charges, and should either resign or be removed from his post.
    You're a helpless case.
     
    Manifesto

    Manifesto

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Here's the video in question


    It sounds funny to me and not insulting.
    It's understandable for people to joke about Sfeir's 'sainthood' considering all the religious hysteria that followed Sfeir's death.

    'Barkeh bi oum ma3eh' ???
     
    J

    joseph_lubnan

    Legendary Member
    When it's in private
    When it contains no insults

    There is no way to incriminate such a joke. No way. Period.

    However, a man just got arrested for such a joke. And that is a dangerous precedent. Something to be seriously worried about, especially that it was done to please hordes of outraged hypocrites, most of them only playing their sectarian outbidding, to please their sectarian crowds.

    The danger is not much about freedom of expression, as much as it is about the complete capitulation of the judicial system and the rule of law, in front of the political power and an excessive rise of sectarianism.

    In such case, sectarianism officially becomes the law.

    Again...Something to be worried about.
    I am happy you finally got worried about these issues.
     
    J

    joseph_lubnan

    Legendary Member
    What about the guy who got arrested for saying something about minister Boustani? @Abou Sandal par exemple!
    And this guy Rachid Jumblat... and Marcel Ghanem, and the many others who got harassed by the legal system and security forces for daring say something objectionable related to FPM's "beloved"? Not a peep or concern? not worried?

    I was worried that you are not worried, now that's something to worry about :)
     
    Last edited:
    fidelio

    fidelio

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    What about the guy who got arrested for saying something about minister Boustani? @Abou Sandal par exemple!
    And this guy Rachid Jumblat... and Marcel Ghanem, and the many others who got harassed by the legal system and security forces for daring say something objectionable related to FPM's "beloved"? Not a peep or concern? not worried?
    There's a big difference between publicly and willingly hurling obscenities and a candid joke that was supposed to be private, although somehow i'm certain you already knew the difference.
     
    J

    joseph_lubnan

    Legendary Member
    I am for absolute freedom of speech, including hateful and disgusting comments. Unfortunately, while our constitution protects freedom of speech (article 13), it only does so insofar as the law permits. Our freedom of the indiviual laws are archaic and misogynistic and require immediate update. Too bad that a typical MP's job in this country is to attend funerals, weddings, social events, and doing wastas for the sheep instead of writing bills and passing legislation.

    One thing to note here: all of the anti-FPM hordes who cried foul over the Mansouriyeh man's arrest due to his insults against the president and two FPM ministers, were pleading and crying like high hippies for freedom of speech. Now they want Asmar crucified and burned a la ISIS style. So much for principles of the anti-FPM sick minded retards.
    I for one am condemning this travesty like I condemned all the other ones. There you have it one example of some consistency. Can FPMers say the same? nope!
     
    J

    joseph_lubnan

    Legendary Member
    There's a big difference between publicly and willingly hurling obscenities and a candid joke that was supposed to be private, although somehow i'm certain you already knew the difference.
    There are always differences in circumstances and context. It is all however, about freedom of speech and undue harassment by the legal system and security forces. Say no to hypocrisy :)
     
    fidelio

    fidelio

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    There are always differences in circumstances and context. It is all however, about freedom of speech and undue harassment by the legal system and security forces. Say no to hypocrisy :)
    No. Differences are not blurred and there are no grey areas. Anyone has the right to sue for defamation, it's a non-brainer.
    A private and casual joke does not, however, justify arrest or prosecution. Now please, allow me to explain again...
     
    J

    joseph_lubnan

    Legendary Member
    No. Differences are not blurred and there are no grey areas. Anyone has the right to sue for defamation, it's a non-brainer.
    A private and casual joke does not, however, justify arrest or prosecution. Now please, allow me to explain again...
    Hypocrisy, intentional or not, no matter, but still hypocrisy.
     
    fidelio

    fidelio

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Hypocrisy, intentional or not, no matter, but still hypocrisy.
    What you posted now doesn't mean anything in the context of this discussion. Do you want me to explain again? Because this could become tiring.
     
    J

    joseph_lubnan

    Legendary Member
    Meen menkon nezel?
    FPM are inviting all those they sued and harassed including the latest guy that offended Boustani, and they are all going there for a picnic. Lord Bassil will deliver a riveting oration.
     
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