Artworks

Picasso

Picasso

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Italian Painter Canaletto



The Return of the Bucentaur to the Molo on Ascension Day (1730) by Canaletto.




The first Westminster Bridge as painted by Canaletto in 1746.
 
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  • Picasso

    Picasso

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    What makes art valuable? - BBC Documentary HD

    [VBTUBE]QXOPBZFvBQ4[/VBTUBE]
     
    Picasso

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    Nude, Green Leaves and Bust ~ Pablo Picasso

     
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    Changing faces: 500 years of women

    [VBTUBE]b-gNa862Juk[/VBTUBE]


    An amazing video shows 90 female portraits morphing into each other in chronological order, from a Russian icon to Picasso’s lover.

    From Renaissance paintings by Titian, Raphael and Botticelli to Picasso’s 1946 sketch of his lover, portraits of women made over the past 500 years stare back at us. Among them are virgins, housewives and goddesses: they look out from the canvas with a coy sideways glance, a challenging stare and a wistful gaze.

    While many of the portraits conform to conventional ideas of beauty, some break the mould. The dishevelled hair of Da Vinci’s La Scapigliata from 1508 caused a stir, and Kazimir Malevich deconstructed the female torso in his series painted between 1928 and 1933. It is a vision that is influencing cutting-edge fashion today.

    Knud Merrild reinterpreted the movie star; Amedeo Modigliani elongated his sitter’s neck; Salvador Dali carved out his sitter’s features from a fruit dish. It is a mesmerising journey through 500 years of Western art.
     
    Picasso

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    Did Rembrandt invent the selfie?


    The Dutch master may have painted the greatest self-portraits of all time. But these works were also prophetic of the social media age. Alastair Sooke explains.

    When social historians come to define the turn of the 21st Century in the future, how will they characterise our era? My bet is that the times we live in will be known as the ‘Age of Narcissism’. Think about how people incessantly use social media, plastering the internet with casual snaps that document their lives in obsessive detail. The phenomenon of the selfie is now so widespread that Oxford Dictionaries selected the term as the ‘word of 2013’. (According to their definition, a selfie is “a photograph that one has taken of oneself, typically with a smartphone or webcam and uploaded to a social media website”.)

    I have been reflecting on this recently because in London, where I live, the art season is getting underway – and one of its biggest exhibitions will be the National Gallery’s Rembrandt: The Late Works, which opens on 15 October. And more than any other artist before or since, Rembrandt van Rijn (1606-69) knew a thing or two about selfies.

    One of the constants of his up-and-down career was a fascination with self-portraits. Over four decades he made around 80 of them in various media, including paintings, drawings and prints, transforming the genre in the process. Estimates differ, but this represents up to 20% of his entire oeuvre. As a result, many museum visitors even today can identify his plain yet distinctive features. That bulbous nose could only belong to one painter in the history of art.

    Scholars generally divide Rembrandt’s self-portraits into three phases. There are the lively and experimental images that he created as a young artist on the make. In these he explores effects of light as well as bizarre grimaces and facial expressions. Often he appears with a shock of chaotic, tangled hair that could be a visual symbol of his fertile creativity.

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    Revolutionary lost Caravaggio painting 'Mary Magdalen in Ecstasy' identified





    The long-lost Caravaggio painting that the baroque master had with him when he died in 1610 has finally been identified, according to the world’s foremost authority on the artist.

    Several copies of Mary Magdalen in Ecstasy are thought to exist. But now the Caravaggio scholar Mina Gregori has said she is confident of having made a “definitive” verification of the version that she has studied in a private European collection.

    After years hunting for the real thing, the eminent art expert and president of Florence’s Roberto Longhi Art History Foundation, declared: “At last, it’s you”, after finding herself seemingly gazing at the Caravaggio original. If true, the discovery would be one of rare importance in Western art.

    Ms Gregori said key characteristics of the painting, the first ever photograph of which was printed in La Repubblica yesterday, left no doubts in her mind regarding its provenance. “The creation of a body with varying tones, the intensity of the face. The strong wrists, crossed fingers and beautiful hair … the wonderful variations in light and colour – all show that it is Caravaggio,” she said.

    She added that the discovery of a handwritten note attached to the back of the 103.5cm by 91.5cm painting, attributing it to Caravaggio, and denoting it is a commission by one of his important patrons, Cardinale Scipione Borghese of Rome, was the final proof. The family, who contacted Ms Gregori for the authentification, have said they have no intention of selling it.

    The existence of a version known as the “Klein Magdalena” in Rome, which some experts have described as authentic, suggests that further controversy is not out of the question. Ms Gregori told The Independent she was pressing the owners of the version she says she has authenticated to make it available for some sort of public display. “Even by Caravaggio’s standards this is a beautiful and revolutionary painting,” she said. “The ultimate goal is that everyone should have the opportunity to see it. But for now all I can say is that it’s in Europe.”

    Caravaggio, born Michelangelo Merisi, is celebrated for his revolutionary use of contrasting light and dark – chiaroscuro – that anticipated the work of later baroque giants including Rembrandt and Velazquez.

    He was thought to have painted the Magdalen in 1606, shortly after fleeing Rome following his conviction for murder. It was during his return to the city in search of a papal pardon, carrying with him the painting, that he was believed to have become ill with fever, and died in Tuscany.

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    Hyper Realistic Drawings by Self-Taught Artist Ivan Hoo These hyper realistic drawings are so lifelike they could pass for photographs. The incredibly detailed works of art were created by self-taught artist Ivan Hoo, from Singapore, who earns a living from his realistic drawings and paintings. The 31-year-old takes up to three days to complete the impressive pieces, which include animal portraits and still life drawings of everyday items such as a Starbucks cup. The A3 sketches are completed using a range of soft pastel pencils and are drawn from still life, or a photograph taken by Ivan himself. Here: Ivan Hoos drawing of a pug.













     
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    Surreal Drawings of Lips by Christo Dagorov
    Have you ever heard of a phenomenon called the Uncanny Valley? Illustrations created by Swiss illustrator Christo Dagorov show how horrible something may look when it’s a hair’s breadth away from looking human. In his illustrations he combined the shape of human lips with trees, buildings, and even human bodies, making it look from a distance as if the lips were horribly deformed by some unknown disease. However, after a while you make out the shapes, yet the feeling of uneasiness remains, making you shiver from unsuppressable disgust.







     
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    Amazing World By Al Hogue

    My painting technique, and my philosophy, can be described in one word - light. The Old Renaissance Masters, like Da Vinci and Rembrandt, recognized that light is the reflection of nature, of life itself. Their paintings are masterful portraits of life. I have spent the last ten years studying their technique. I want viewers of my artwork to feel as if the painting were glowing and radiating its own light source. Light is everything in my paintings: Light is both my primary technique and the symbol of God's life-giving, healing nature.











     
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    Adonna Khare and Her Pencil

    Originally hailing from a small town in Iowa, Adonna Khare was this year’s recipient of the Art Prize 2012 for her amazingly detailed large-scale pencil on paper works. All of Khare’s work evolve naturally without much pre-planning, essentially building her pieces as she continues to work.









     
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    Pencil Drawings By Guram Dolenjashvili

    Dolenjashvili is a Georgian painter often working in a monochrome technique. He is a Meritorious Artist of Georgia and an honorary member of Russian Academy of Arts.

    Dolenjashvili was born in Kutaisi. He graduated from the Tbilisi Academy of Arts in 1968 where he studied in the shop of Lado Grigolia. He mostly lived in Kutaisi but travel led to Russian North, White Sea, Kamchatka and Chukotka. His works are exhibited in the Art Museum of Georgia, Tretyakov Gallery, Pushkin Museum, Russian Museum and many others.

    Many of his works are landscapes made in black and white, using a graphite pencil or etching with slightly surrealist shifting of reality still he is often considered a follower of traditions Russian realist landscapers of Ivan Shishkin and Yuly Klever.









     
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    Realistic Paintings By Michael Zavros



    Michael Zavros is an Australian realist painter. Michael Zavros is one of Australia’s most significant younger realist painters. He is fascinated by beauty and his subjects include leaping and falling horses, men in suits, high fashion, classical mythology and French neo-classical architecture. Every single one of his art pieces looks amazing !Just keep in mind that all the images published here are paintings !






     
    Picasso

    Picasso

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    Sir James Jebusa Shannon (1862-1923)

    My favorite is at 1:10.


     
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    Picasso

    Picasso

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    Victor Gilbert



    Le marché aux fleurs




    The Flower Seller






     
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