Ashura thread - To commomerotate the great Imam Hussein (AS)

  • Thread starter 𓍝𓂀𓄃𓇼
  • Start date
𓍝𓂀𓄃𓇼

𓍝𓂀𓄃𓇼

Active Member
Orange Room Supporter
This thread is to commemorate the tragic and heroic death of Imam Hussein (AS). No trolling please.


1567621417668.png
 
  • Advertisement
  • NiceV

    NiceV

    Well-Known Member
    He is a messianic figure type
    But he was trying to take power by force so he deserved his fate
    The Umayyad were great tolerant ruler who were married to Christians women is some cases
    The Umayyad conquered North Africa Spain and reached India
    I think the only person who is worthy of greatness and respect in the Shia community is Imam Ali Bin Abi Talib a great respected man and a man of letters not his Son Hussein who is a political failure
     
    𓍝𓂀𓄃𓇼

    𓍝𓂀𓄃𓇼

    Active Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    He is a messianic figure type
    But he was trying to take power by force so he deserved his fate
    The Umayyad were great tolerant ruler who were married to Christians women is some cases
    The Umayyad conquered North Africa Spain and reached India
    I think the only person who is worthy of greatness and respect in the Shia community is Imam Ali Bin Abi Talib a great respected man and a man of letters not his Son Hussein who is a political failure
    You make no sense, hobz. Imam Ali was also a warrior and stood up and fought with the sword against Aisha and others. And died by the sword because of an assassination. The point made by the Twelver faith is that Imam Ali and Imam Hussein were defending their rightful power, after Imam Ali being conned by Uthman's tricks and after they were persecuted.
     
    𓍝𓂀𓄃𓇼

    𓍝𓂀𓄃𓇼

    Active Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    For a moment, I thought I just stepped into Ghobayri by mistake.
    The whole world cries because of Imam Hussien's (AS) tragic death.


    Edward G. Brown (Professor at the University of Cambridge)

    β€œβ€¦a reminder of that blood-stained field of Karbala, where the grandson of the Apostle of God fell, at length, tortured by thirst, and surround by the bodies of his murdered kinsmen, has been at anytime since then, sufficient to evoke, even in the most lukewarm and the heedless, the deepest emotion, the most frantic grief, and an exaltation of spirit before which pain, danger, and death shrink to unconsidered trifles.” (A Literary History of Persia, London, 1919, p.227)

    Mahatma Gandhi (Father of the Nation – India)

    β€œMy admiration for the noble sacrifice of Imam Hussein (a.s) as a martyr abounds, because he accepted death and the torture of thrust for himself, for his sons, and for his whole family, but did not submit to unjust authorities.” β€œI learnt from Hussain how to achieve victory while being oppressed.”
     
    𓍝𓂀𓄃𓇼

    𓍝𓂀𓄃𓇼

    Active Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    imam hussein, as his story is told, was a good person.

    you are not.
    Hobz, Imam Hussein (AS) is surely a better person than I am. But it's not like you know me. You make it sound like we drink Mateh together every Saturday.
     
    NiceV

    NiceV

    Well-Known Member
    You make no sense, hobz. Imam Ali was also a warrior and stood up and fought with the sword against Aisha and others. And died by the sword because of an assassination. The point made by the Twelver faith is that Imam Ali and Imam Hussein were defending their rightful power, after Imam Ali being conned by Uthman's tricks and after they were persecuted.
    Imam Ali a rassi
    Imam Hussein a failure
     
    NiceV

    NiceV

    Well-Known Member
    The great Muawiya Crusader I will almost say
    retained its Byzantine-era bureaucracy, which was staffed by Christians including the head of the tax administration, Sarjun ibn Mansur.[113] The latter had served Mu'awiya in this capacity before his attainment of the caliphate,[114] and Sarjun's father was the likely holder of the office under Emperor Heraclius (r. 610–641).[113] Mu'awiya was tolerant toward Syria's native Christian majority.[115] In turn, this community was generally satisfied with his rule, under which their conditions were at least as favorable as under the Byzantines.[115]Mu'awiya attempted to mint his own coins, but the new currency was rejected by the Syrians as it omitted the symbol of the cross.[116] In the sole epigraphic attestation to Mu'awiya's rule in Syria, a Greek inscription dated to 663 discovered at the hot springs of Hamat Gader near Lake Tiberias,[117] the caliph is referred to as "Abd Allah Mu'awiya, amΔ«r al-muΚΎminΔ«n" (God's Servant Mu'awiya, commander of the faithful) and is credited for restoring Roman-era bath facilities for the benefit of the sick; in the inscription, the caliph's name is preceded by a cross.[118] According to the historian Yizhar Hirschfeld, "by this deed, the new caliph sought to please" his Christian subjects.[118] The caliph often spent his winters at his Sinnabra palace near the shores of Lake Tiberias.[119] Mu'awiya was also credited with ordering the restoration of Edessa's church after it was ruined in an earthquake in 679.[120] Mu'awiya demonstrated a keen interest in Jerusalem.[121] Though archaeological evidence is lacking, there are indications in medieval literary sources that a rudimentary mosque on the Temple Mount existed as early as Mu'awiya's time or was built by him.[122][e]
     
    NiceV

    NiceV

    Well-Known Member
    Maysun the Crusader wife of Muawiya
    And the mother of Crusader Yazid
    700), is noted as a wife of Caliph Muβ€˜Δwiya I, and as mother of his successor and son Caliph YazΔ«d ibn Muβ€˜Δwiya. In this capacity, she had a significant role in the politics of the Umayyad Caliphate.
    MaysΕ«n bint BaαΈ₯dal also enjoys a reputation as one of the earliest attested Arabic-language women poets.[1] However, that reputation seems to belong to another woman of a similar name, MaysΕ«n bint Jandal (see below).
    Contents
    MaysΕ«n bint BaαΈ₯dal belonged to the Kalb Bedouin tribe,[2] daughter of the Kalb's leader, Bahdal ibn Unayf.[3] Muβ€˜Δwiya's marriage to her, perhaps in 645,[4] was politically motivated, as she was the daughter of the chief of the Kalb tribe. The Kalb tribe had remained largely neutral when the Muslims first went into Syria. After the plague that killed much of the Muslim Army in Syria.
    In the assessment of Nabia Abbott,
    MaysΕ«n bint BaαΈ₯dal, wife of Muβ€˜Δwiya I, is named in some secondary sources as MaysΕ«n bint Jandal.[6] MaysΕ«n bint Jandal seems, however, to have been a different woman, of the Fazārah. This MaisΕ«n is apparently the author of the following celebrated poem, which has often been misattributed to MaysΕ«n bint BaαΈ₯dal, enabling the characterisation of Muβ€˜Δwiya I's wife as colourfully committed to country life; the story even circulates that Muβ€˜Δwiya divorced MaysΕ«n bint BaαΈ₯dal because of the offence he took at this poem and that she took her young son with her to grow up in the desert.[7] As paraphrased by H. W. Freeland, the poem runs as follows:[8]
     
    𓍝𓂀𓄃𓇼

    𓍝𓂀𓄃𓇼

    Active Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Imam Ali a rassi
    Imam Hussein a failure
    Your logic can also be applied to Christianity.

    Roman Emperor Constantine the Great (AD 306–337) 3la rassi.
    Yeshua the Galilean a failure
     
    Dark Angel

    Dark Angel

    Legendary Member
    Hobz, Imam Hussein (AS) is surely a better person than I am. But it's not like you know me. You make it sound like we drink Mateh together every Saturday.
    i am not saying he was a better person than you. i am telling you he was a good person, whereas you yourself are not a good person, and do not really value any of his attributes nor are you inspired by them. it had to be said given that you had the insolence to request this thread not to be trolled, but you do not shy away from trolling other people beliefs in other threads. it is as simple as that. subject closed.
     
    theMightyRedV

    theMightyRedV

    Well-Known Member
    Can i ask that the mods delete this thread if this is going to be used to mock the figure of Imam Hussein and the event of Ashura. You can hate HA (and Muslims) all you want, but the event of Karbala is very sacred to millions of people around the world.
     
    𓍝𓂀𓄃𓇼

    𓍝𓂀𓄃𓇼

    Active Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    i am not saying he was a better person than you. i am telling you he was a good person, whereas you yourself are not a good person, and do not really value any of his attributes nor are you inspired by them. it had to be said given that you had the insolence to request this thread not to be trolled, but you do not shy away from trolling other people beliefs in other threads. it is as simple as that. subject closed.
    How would you know whether I'm a good person or not? From your Tarot cards?
     
    𓍝𓂀𓄃𓇼

    𓍝𓂀𓄃𓇼

    Active Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Can i ask that the mods delete this thread if this is going to be used to mock the figure of Imam Hussein and the event of Ashura. You can hate HA (and Muslims) all you want, but the event of Karbala is very sacred to millions of people around the world.
    Report any troll post. Like @LVV's.
     
    Dark Angel

    Dark Angel

    Legendary Member
    How would you know whether I'm a good person or not? From your Tarot cards?
    why, you think your posts on the forum do not reflect what kind of a person you are? do they not represent your own opinions? are they written by someone else?
     
    AtheistForYeezus

    AtheistForYeezus

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    You make no sense, hobz. Imam Ali was also a warrior and stood up and fought with the sword against Aisha and others. And died by the sword because of an assassination. The point made by the Twelver faith is that Imam Ali and Imam Hussein were defending their rightful power, after Imam Ali being conned by Uthman's tricks and after they were persecuted.
    Honestly, I think the cause for which they fought was neither noble nor just. And hence, I don't think of them as heroes, although I admit that the way they died was sad.

    Ali's supporters argued that his sons should become caliphs, thereby preserving succession through the Prophet's bloodline. In other terms, they were in favor of an Islamic despotic dictatorship.
    Sunnis, on the other hand, believed that the succession to Muhammad should be according to the consensus of the whole community, which I think is a fairer concept and more in line with today's democracy.
     
    Top