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Assisted Dying - Should it be legalized?

Do you support legalizing Assisted Dying in your country?

  • Strongly support - individuals have the right to choose when to end their life

  • Moderately support - terminally ill patients only

  • Moderately support - terminally ill and mental health patients only

  • Oppose - life is sacred and any form of ending life is morally wrong

  • Not sure


Results are only viewable after voting.
loubnaniTO

loubnaniTO

Legendary Member
Staff member
Super Penguin
You think there aren't countless people who have thought about suicide, been on the verge of it, and chose not to go through with it because they knew it was wrong for various reasons?

Not going through with it doesn't mean they don't know exactly how the pain feels.
Not sure how this contradicts with what I said. Those who were close to it can speak better about it than the rest of us who haven’t been there and yet judge those who attempt it or go through with jt. And by being there I don’t mean the passing thought of it, but actually being deep in a depression or a terminal illness and seriously considering ending their life.
 
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  • Indie

    Indie

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Not sure how this contradicts with what I said. Those who were close to it can speak better about it than the rest of us who haven’t been there and yet judge those who attempt it or go through with jt. And by being there I don’t mean the passing thought of it, but actually being deep in a depression or a terminal illness and seriously considering ending their life.
    That's exactly what I'm addressing. Many people have been in that exact spot; and, yet, managed to get out of it. A lot of the time, because others were there to care for them, or because they felt a responsibility towards others.

    By banalizing suicide, you take away that layer of protection that can make the difference between someone overcoming their suicidal state or giving in to it.
     
    loubnaniTO

    loubnaniTO

    Legendary Member
    Staff member
    Super Penguin
    That's exactly what I'm addressing. Many people have been in that exact spot; and, yet, managed to get out of it. A lot of the time, because others were there to care for them, or because they felt a responsibility towards others.

    By banalizing suicide, you take away that layer of protection that can make the difference between someone overcoming their suicidal state or giving in to it.
    I don’t think I’m banalizing it. There are many attempts that could be saved through support and that should be the main focus of course! But when it comes to some situations where someone has a terminal illness and suffering, they should have the right to end their life and if they’re deciding it with full consciousness why can’t we support their decision?
     
    Indie

    Indie

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    I don’t think I’m banalizing it. There are many attempts that could be saved through support and that should be the main focus of course! But when it comes to some situations where someone has a terminal illness and suffering, they should have the right to end their life and if they’re deciding it with full consciousness why can’t we support their decision?
    And where do doctors draw the line?
     
    Indie

    Indie

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    That should be the debate rather than saying an outright no
    There can be no debate because there is no clear line to draw. There are too many variables between each individual case to be able to make foolproof rules. No matter what, you will end up with subjective opinions.

    I would rather say an outright no, because I consider it objectively wrong to end a life. Other than the reasons I already mentioned, the debate on assisted suicide is one that will take society either a step closer to nihilism, or a step closer to sanctity.
     
    R

    ruins

    Member
    Let’s face it, this is one of the sensitive subjects where there will never be a unanimous agreement on this, especially when religious or ethical beliefs are thrown in the mix. However, here are a few thoughts to keep in mind while debating it:

    1- one should never JUDGE those who die by suicide. If we are in a full state of mind, in (relatively) good health, and can (relatively) check in our emotions, this does not give us the right to judge and label others who cannot. If we have not been there we cannot understand what they’re going through
    Is promoting suicide prevention as opposed to suicide assistance considered judging?
    2- suicide has been around throughout the history of humans. It’s not a modern phenomenon. Assisted suicide is not meant to encourage suicide, but rather to ensure it is done in a “safe” and painless way when the person is fully aware of their decision, as opposed to an impulsive decision following a break up. Assisted suicide should be accompanied by an investment in assisted “recovery” for those who are going through depression or psychological hardships
    Why should we invest in assisted recovery? It is their decision to die, they should simply die, that would also save a lot of resources on governments that can be invested for those who wish to stay alive. As other forumers already asserted, it is "their wish" to die, why do you want to force them to recover against their wish? Also, why are you making them look as if they are sick? They simply have a wish to die, why judge them as sick in need for recovery?
     
    Elvis left the building

    Elvis left the building

    Legendary Member
    There can be no debate because there is no clear line to draw. There are too many variables between each individual case to be able to make foolproof rules. No matter what, you will end up with subjective opinions.

    I would rather say an outright no, because I consider it objectively wrong to end a life. Other than the reasons I already mentioned, the debate on assisted suicide is one that will take society either a step closer to nihilism, or a step closer to sanctity.
    If someone is in hellish pain

    With no hope of recovery

    Whats the point of keeping them suffering if they want it to end
     
    T

    Thoma

    New Member
    If someone is in hellish pain

    With no hope of recovery

    Whats the point of keeping them suffering if they want it to end
    Thats a lie, a misconception thats propagated by the pro-(weak_and_innocent_people killing) wicked folks because they have no leg to stand on, rationally wise. Dont fall for it. No patient is being forced to suffer. There's something called palliative care for -actually- alleviating the suffering of the terminally ill patients, and which in all sad irony euthanasia directly undermines, philosophically and practically.
     
    loubnaniTO

    loubnaniTO

    Legendary Member
    Staff member
    Super Penguin
    There can be no debate because there is no clear line to draw. There are too many variables between each individual case to be able to make foolproof rules. No matter what, you will end up with subjective opinions.

    I would rather say an outright no, because I consider it objectively wrong to end a life. Other than the reasons I already mentioned, the debate on assisted suicide is one that will take society either a step closer to nihilism, or a step closer to sanctity.
    Let’s agree to disagree. There is subjectivity in many medical issues. Like when we decide to pull the plug or not, or whether an invasive operation is warranted or not. It is not always 100% objective
     
    loubnaniTO

    loubnaniTO

    Legendary Member
    Staff member
    Super Penguin
    Is promoting suicide prevention as opposed to suicide assistance considered judging?
    No. I was addressing my comments specifically to those who judge people who choose to end their life.
     
    R

    ruins

    Member
    No. I was addressing my comments specifically to those who judge people who choose to end their life.
    What were they judged as? You seem to have judged them as sick in need for recovery as you called for investment in their recovery (which is against their wishes), while they simply want to die.
     
    Dark Angel

    Dark Angel

    Legendary Member
    No. I was addressing my comments specifically to those who judge people who choose to end their life.
    That should be the debate rather than saying an outright no
    part of the problem is that most of these arguments are starting from the wrong premises because - and unlike what progress would suggest - most people are no longer capable of critical thinking and analysis, and most people no longer have their priorities in order and are no longer exact in formulating their thoughts and opinions.

    to begin with, truth and rationality always trump emotions. feeling for the hisashi ouchi situation does not mean that we have to respect people's will to end their life even when they make a very rational argument for it. the people pushing this arguments forward are not aware that most hospitals in the western world serve their patients with a "do not resuscitate" optional form that the patient can sign.

    what i have strong objections for, is moving from the exceptional case of hisachi ouchi to the direction in which the arguments are going to generalize the respect for the will of a person to die. that transition is not acceptable.

    if a person reaches a certain age and is empty beyond all measures to the point where death and assisted suicide appear to be his or her only rational exit, then the problem is not in whether or not we should respect that person's wish, but rather the problems resides int the very mental state that lead that person to such emptiness. now when at the same time the same people promoting the notions of assisted suicide are also propagating all sorts of of ideologies leading to spiritual emptiness, then the answer to assisted suicide becomes a resounding NO! as this is no longer a debate from a medical perspective which takes the survival chances into account.

    and when people are not even curious to understand why most people who develop an attachment to Christ grow old and remain happy and giving throughout their pain, then you can rest assured that they are actually doing is nothing short of spreading a gloomy and empty culture of death, no matter how they attempt to decorate the words and no matter how much stardust and emotions they attempt to sprinkle in the face of mankind.

    that is the real issue at hands.
     
    Last edited:
    Indie

    Indie

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    If someone is in hellish pain

    With no hope of recovery

    Whats the point of keeping them suffering if they want it to end
    I already replied to this question throughout the thread :)
     
    Indie

    Indie

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Let’s agree to disagree. There is subjectivity in many medical issues. Like when we decide to pull the plug or not, or whether an invasive operation is warranted or not. It is not always 100% objective
    That's true. But there is a difference between someone not being able to survive without life support or an operation, and someone who can.
     
    Indie

    Indie

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    No. I was addressing my comments specifically to those who judge people who choose to end their life.
    It's not about judging people. We're making a philosophical argument on a social issue, and explaining why one option is ultimately better for society.
     
    Indie

    Indie

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    This woman wanted assisted suicide...her story 15 years later...

     
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