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Boeing 737 Max: The beginning of Boeing demise?

proIsrael-nonIsraeli

proIsrael-nonIsraeli

Legendary Member
some RT for you guy...not sure how true but interesting:
Most likely it is true.
However it also does bot mean that it is 100% replacements, but only some part of it.
 
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    Boeing records zero new plane orders as Paris Air Show starts slow

    Boeing knew the Paris Air Show would be slow, but this may have been worse than they expected. On day one of the show, Boeing did not announce a single new order for any of its airplanes, while Airbus recorded orders and options for 123 planes, according to the aviation consulting firm IBA.iQ.

    Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg admitted to CNBC that this air show would not be about orders, but instead be an opportunity for his company to reassure customers and suppliers that Boeing is making progress getting the grounded 737 Max back in the air.


    “We’ll get it back in the air when it’s safe — that is the most important thing here,” Muilenburg told CNBC.

    Boeing did announce General Electric’s aircraft leasing division, GECAS, will convert a previous order of 10 737-900 planes into freighter models.

    By comparison, Airbus flew into Paris expecting to grab most of the new plane orders with the introduction of a new narrow-body plane, the A321XLR. That happened early Monday morning when Air Lease Corporation, which leases hundreds of planes to airlines around the world, places an $11 billion order for 100 Airbus planes, including 27 XLR’s.

    Air Lease CEO John Plueger told CNBC the XLR will be “a blockbuster” when first deliveries start in 2023. “This is in our view a true 757 replacement, but on a much more fuel efficient basis,” he said.

    Airbus CEO Guillaume Faury is confident the stretch version of the A321LR will be certified with the next four years. “We think there is strong demand for the plane,” he said after launching the plane.


    Overall orders at this years air show are expected to be their lowest since 2016 according to IBA.iQ.
     
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    Boeing’s 737 MAX Name Change Talk: What You Need To Know

    Topline: Boeing doesn’t have any immediate plans to rename its embattled 737 MAX aircraft despite CFO Greg Smith saying he was open to the idea earlier Monday.
    • In an interview with Bloomberg at the Paris airshow, Smith said, “We're committed to doing what we need to do to restore it. If that means changing the brand to restore it, then we'll address that.”
    • After the interview, the company told Reuters it isn’t currently working on a name change.
    “Our immediate focus is the safe return of the MAX to service and re-earning the trust of airlines and the traveling public. We remain open-minded to all input from customers and other stakeholders but have no plans at this time to change the name of the 737 MAX," said Boeing spokesman Paul Bergman.
    The idea for a name change comes from President Donald Trump, who weighed in on Boeing’s myriad safety and public relations issues in March.
    “What do I know about branding, maybe nothing (but I did become President!), but if I were Boeing, I would FIX the Boeing 737 MAX, add some additional great features, & REBRAND the plane with a new name,” he tweeted.

    All 737 MAX planes are still grounded: They were grounded worldwide in March following two deadly crashes that claimed 346 lives. Investigators are focusing on design flaws in a component of the plane’s automated flight controls called the maneuvering characteristics augmentation system, or MCAS.

    Boeing said last month that it has completed the software update necessary to address the aircraft’s safety issues, but the Federal Aviation Administration still has to approve the change.

    The company doesn’t know when the 737 MAX will be allowed to fly again.
     
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    American Airlines becomes the first US airline to order new Airbus plane


    American Airlines has agreed to order 50 of Airbus’ longest-range, single aisle aircraft, a big endorsement for the planes that Boeing’s chief rival unveiled earlier this week.
    The deal for the A321XLR jetliners, announced at the Paris Air Show on Wednesday, makes the Fort Worth-based airline the first major U.S. carrier to agree to buy the longest-range narrowbody plane Airbus now offers. Under the agreement, American will convert 30 of its orders for the smaller Airbus A321neo in favor of the longer-range model, and order an 20 additional A321XLRs.

    The planes could replace some older aircraft like Boeing 757s. The new planes are aimed at longer routes where there aren’t enough travelers to support the expense of operating a larger twin-aisle jet.
    American’s endorsement of the new Airbus planes comes as Boeing is mulling an all-new double-aisle plane targeting mid-range routes. Analysts had expected Boeing to unveil the new offering at the Paris Air Show. But hopes faded as the Chicago-based company has been hobbled by the crisis left by two fatal crashes of its best-selling 737 Max planes, which have been grounded since mid-March.
     
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    Pilots Criticize Boeing, Saying 737 MAX 'Should Never Have Been Approved'

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    One of the nation's best known airline pilots is speaking out on the problems with Boeing's 737 MAX jetliner. Retired Capt. Chesley "Sully" Sullenberger told a congressional subcommittee Wednesday that an automated flight control system on the 737 MAX "was fatally flawed and should never have been approved."
     
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    Southwest Airlines pilots say they're losing $9M a month in wages on Boeing 737 Max grounding

    Pilots for Dallas-based Southwest Airlines say the grounding of Boeing's troubled 737 Max aircraft is costing them about $9 million a month in lost wages.
    The Southwest Airlines Pilots Association, which represents 10,000 pilots, said Wednesday that it'll seek reimbursement from Boeing for lost wages and legal costs incurred by the union for cooperating with the U.S. Department of Justice. It's the first labor group to join carriers in pushing to recover costs from Boeing.
    The union told The Dallas Morning News that the $9 million figure is "a conservative estimate." Southwest pilots are paid based on the number of trips they fly. With the Max aircraft out of service since mid-March, fewer trips are being flown, the union said.
    Pilots for Dallas-based Southwest Airlines say the grounding of Boeing's troubled 737 Max aircraft is costing them about $9 million a month in lost wages.
    The Southwest Airlines Pilots Association, which represents 10,000 pilots, said Wednesday that it'll seek reimbursement from Boeing for lost wages and legal costs incurred by the union for cooperating with the U.S. Department of Justice. It's the first labor group to join carriers in pushing to recover costs from Boeing.
    The union told The Dallas Morning News that the $9 million figure is "a conservative estimate." Southwest pilots are paid based on the number of trips they fly. With the Max aircraft out of service since mid-March, fewer trips are being flown, the union said.
    "SWAPA will be seeking compensation and reimbursement from Boeing for every dollar legally available to be challenged when the Max issues are resolved," the union said in a statement.
    Southwest flies the most Max jets of any airline — 34 — in its famously all-Boeing 737 fleet. The nation's largest domestic carrier has taken the Max off its flight schedules through Labor Day weekend, resulting in about 100 cancellations a day.
    The planes, also used by American and United airlines, will be out of commission for three of the nation's four major carriers throughout the busy summer travel season. There's no firm timetable for when the Max aircraft will be allowed to fly again.
     
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    400+ 737 MAX pilots sue Boeing over ‘unprecedented cover-up’ that led to crashes & grounding

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    A class-action lawsuit against Boeing reportedly accuses the US aviation giant of covering up the faulty sensor issue and keeping pilots in the dark about the feature in the pursuit of quick returns.
    The legal action was started by a pilot, identified only as ‘Pilot X’ in court documents, which were seen by the Australian Broadcasting Company. He was joined by over 400 fellow pilots, trained to fly the fourth-generation narrow-body 737 MAX aircraft. They accuse the Chicago-based aviation corporation of hushing known concerns about the glitch-ridden equipment installed on the jets.
    The main problem with the jets is rooted in the “inherently dangerous aerodynamic handling defects” of the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System (MCAS), designed to prevent the plane from stalling. Its smooth operation depends on data it receives from two Angle of Attack (AoA) alert sensors. There are two of them for a reason: if the data from the sensors does not match, then a AoA Disagree alert should light up, notifying the pilots of the discrepancy.

    For the latter to work properly, an optional set of indicators needs to be installed on the plane, and only 20 percent of the 737 MAX jets had them. Boeing recently admitted that it knew of the problem since at least 2017, but did not notify the US Federal Aviation Authority (FAA) until after the Lion Air flight with 189 people on board crashed in Indonesia last October. Moreover, it did not plan to update the software until 2020.


    The lawsuit, which demands compensation for lost wages and mental suffering that the pilots endured due to the grounding, alleges that the aviation giant should have known that by sweeping the issue under the rug, it set the stage for exactly that outcome.

    The complaint says that Boeing “engaged in an unprecedented cover-up of the known design flaws of the MAX, which predictably resulted in the crashes of two MAX aircraft and subsequent grounding of all MAX aircraft worldwide.

    Pilots “suffer and continue to suffer significant lost wages, among other economic and non-economic damages,” it claims.

    In addition, the pilots accuse Boeing of providing little instruction on how to handle the anti-stalling feature, which is only briefly mentioned in the flight manuals. They allege that such casual approach to familiarizing pilots with new software was deliberate – and was meant to save the cost of introducing new simulator-based training so that pilots would take up “revenue-generating routes as quickly as possible.

    The plaintiffs say that their ultimate goal is to prevent tragedies such as the Lion Air and Ethiopian Airlines crashes, which claimed 346 lives, from happening in the future by deterring “Boeing and other airplane manufacturers from placing corporate profits ahead of the lives of the pilots, crews, and general public they service.

    The lawsuit will be heard by a Chicago court in October.
     
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