Books to read ?

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  • shadow1

    shadow1

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    @dripstraws
    Might not be exactly what you're looking for, but it is a book I highly recommend to anyone who asks me "what book should I read?"

    "The Unbearable Lightness of Being" by Milan Kundera
    This book was suggested to me by a well learned friend. I read it twice withn 2 year period. Only when I was approaching the end of my second read that I said to myself this sounds a bit familiar. To me personally it was one of the dullest books I have ever read. Perhaps I did not understand it and that is not uncommon when it comes to books written by modern writers particularly western writers so busy with angst inflictig the modern european. These people lead easy lives, torn between their material satisfaction and spiritual emptiness. I can't tell how many times I finished books not even knowing what the hell they were about. Famous Australian writers fall pretty much in this category.Dull and boring. I never forget a book written by a Nobel prize winner. Up to page 85 he was still talking about one afternoon. In the end I couldnt take the boredom anymore and never came near that writer again in spite of all the accolades.
    I prefer a bit of drama ond suspense in books and not reading ten page about how the protagonist reacted to a sight of alittle girl walking her fluffy dog in the rain.
    Europeans left us an immense literary legacy but that is all in the past now. Better if they focus on non fiction.
     
    HalaMadrid

    HalaMadrid

    Active Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Not your traditional page turners but fun and entertaining reads full of interesting references and you get somewhat invested in the characters.

    SmartSelect_20200201-122133_Google.jpg SmartSelect_20200201-122054_Google.jpg
     
    Picasso

    Picasso

    Legendary Member
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    Currently reading




    "Breton did not unequivocally decide to abandon literature for psychiatry, but rather hesitated between the two, again hoping for some external resolution to his internal dilemma. On one level, however, his choice had been made, for poetry in the larger sense was never far from his mind. Breton’s attraction to the phenomena he witnessed at the center derived less from their therapeutic value than from their applicability to the roots of artistic creation. “Nothing strikes me so much as the interpretations of these madmen,” he reported to Apollinaire. “My fate, instinctively, is to subject the artist to a similar test.” For him, the genius of the insane (or those labeled as such) lay in their instinctive ability to fashion “the most distant relations between ideas, the rarest verbal alliances”—in other words, to create poetry of the most startling, unusual, and fertile kind. At the same time, he had seen ample evidence of the degradation and decrepitude their condition entailed, and he harbored few illusions about the fate of someone who gave himself over entirely to delirium, fertile though it might be. He resolved to keep his patients and their uncanny insights at a safe distance. For the moment, he studied the discipline, observed Leroy on his rounds, and flirted with the idea of leaving his literary persona behind—all the while keeping poetry firmly in the corner of his eye."

    Mark Polizzotto. Revolution of the Mind: The Life of Andre Breton (p. 47). Black Widow Press. Kindle Edition.
     
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    loubnaniTO

    loubnaniTO

    Legendary Member
    Staff member
    Super Penguin
    back to this post, i am now at the midpoint of the book, i have to say i like it, even tho its not my usual type of books. it brings u back to it even tho its no thriller.
    thx for the recommendation, u dhould giv it a try @loubnaniTO
    I’ve been looking for it. Found it on amazon but won’t get here before I leave on vacation. It might have to wait.
    for now I got “Finding Chika”. Started it, and it seems interesting.
     
    Orangina

    Orangina

    Legendary Member
    The gifts of Imperfections : Let go of who you think you're supposed to be and embrace who you are
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    nice book to read for self improvement
     
    Orangina

    Orangina

    Legendary Member
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    ديوان شعري لمحمود درويش... مواضيع مختلفة سياسية واجتماعية... كتاب يستحق القرائة... اسلوب رائع ومميز ككاتبه
     
    Picasso

    Picasso

    Legendary Member
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    View attachment 18682
    ديوان شعري لمحمود درويش... مواضيع مختلفة سياسية واجتماعية... كتاب يستحق القرائة... اسلوب رائع ومميز ككاتبه
    I bought this book in 2003 when it was published, along with two books by Adonis called تنبّأ أبّها الأعمى and أوّل الجسد آخر البحر

    The two poets have greatly influenced the way I perceive the world.

    Here are two other recommended books by Darwish.




     
    Picasso

    Picasso

    Legendary Member
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    In Search of Lost Time ~ Marcel Proust

     
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