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Carlos Ghosn vs. Japan's legal system [Flees to Lebanon]

Is the arrest of Carlos Ghosn

  • Political

    Votes: 11 47.8%
  • Normal he is corrupted

    Votes: 5 21.7%
  • He is like a lot of Lebanese corrupted

    Votes: 7 30.4%
  • A shame to Lebanon

    Votes: 3 13.0%

  • Total voters
    23

Resign

Well-Known Member
Orange Room Supporter
He is Lebanese and at home.
He represents very well Lebanon and we are fighters, not people who take injustice

He was amazing, i am very proud of being Lebanese

If Japanese are smart they can outbid him and bribe high Lebanese officials
same as he did
I can assure you they'll put him on the first plane back to Tokyo

And you'll feel more proud to be Lebanese LOL
 

Resign

Well-Known Member
Orange Room Supporter
[email protected] the Guardian. Nothing distasteful. Meaning sneaky Japanese minds knows how to create surprise.

Anyone who feels butthurt by such words, needs a therapy or maybe a lobotomy, to remove the SJW part of his mind.

Um, i'm not sure i agree with you here man
Pearl Harbour's repercussions was 2 Nuclear bombs dropped over Japan
I don't know if that's something appropriate to say or to compare an arrest to.
 

Danny Z

Legendary Member
If Japanese are smart they can outbid him and bribe high Lebanese officials
same as he did
I can assure you they'll put him on the first plane back to Tokyo

And you'll feel more proud to be Lebanese LOL
The Lebanese government did not help him escape and was not part of the plot, and he entered Lebanon legally. But if the Japanese government sends operatives to Lebanon to kidnap him and knowing he is Lebanese on Lebanese land, this will actually create an international incident with Lebanon, Lebanon would be able to retaliate and go into the Japanese embassy (Japanese territory and kidnap the Japanese ambassador) which would be normal retaliation.
 

Resign

Well-Known Member
Orange Room Supporter
The Lebanese government did not help him escape and was not part of the plot, and he entered Lebanon legally. But if the Japanese government sends operatives to Lebanon to kidnap him and knowing he is Lebanese on Lebanese land, this will actually create an international incident with Lebanon, Lebanon would be able to retaliate and go into the Japanese embassy (Japanese territory and kidnap the Japanese ambassador) which would be normal retaliation.

He was so sure that he's safe in Lebanon
he said it out loud

How can you get shelter guarantees in Lebanon ?
Especially that he visisted Israel and met Shimon Perez it's so easy to throw him in jail if they want
you bribe people
 

Abou Sandal

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
Um, i'm not sure i agree with you here man
Pearl Harbour's repercussions was 2 Nuclear bombs dropped over Japan
I don't know if that's something appropriate to say or to compare an arrest to.

Pearl harbour was a military operation in which the Japs attacked the US fleet at harbour and by surprise. End of story. Nothing to do with other events of the war that resulted.
 

Jorje

Legendary Member
[email protected] the Guardian. Nothing distasteful. Meaning sneaky Japanese minds knows how to create surprise.

Anyone who feels butthurt by such words, needs a therapy or maybe a lobotomy, to remove the SJW part of his mind.

Sneaky Japanese minds know how to surprise?

Just awfully racist. He shot himself in the foot there. This will not go well.
 

TayyarBeino

Legendary Member
[B][SIZE=6]لوريس قسطنطين[/SIZE][/B][SIZE=6]‏Verified account @[B]LauriceC[/B][/SIZE] 4h4 hours ago
More
ساعتان ونصف الساعة ووسائل اعلام كبرى من حول العالم تبثّ مباشرة من بيروت مؤتمرا صحافيا لشخص استثنائي. نعم #كارلوس_غصن قيادي ومؤثّر من الطراز الرفيع بكل حيوية وثقة أدار مؤتمرا صحافيا شارك فيه اعلاميون عريقون طرحوا عليه أصعب الأسئلة ونجح بشكل مبهر في الدفاع عن نفسه والدفع ببراءته
 

Viral

Active Member
[B][SIZE=6]لوريس قسطنطين[/SIZE][/B][SIZE=6]‏Verified account @[B]LauriceC[/B][/SIZE] 4h4 hours ago
More

ساعتان ونصف الساعة ووسائل اعلام كبرى من حول العالم تبثّ مباشرة من بيروت مؤتمرا صحافيا لشخص استثنائي. نعم #كارلوس_غصن قيادي ومؤثّر من الطراز الرفيع بكل حيوية وثقة أدار مؤتمرا صحافيا شارك فيه اعلاميون عريقون طرحوا عليه أصعب الأسئلة ونجح بشكل مبهر في الدفاع عن نفسه والدفع ببراءته
One word can describe this fortress: Brilliant.
I pity the Japanese who abused a treasure they had in their hands that didn’t even belong to them.
 

Abou Sandal

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
Sneaky Japanese minds know how to surprise?

Just awfully racist. He shot himself in the foot there. This will not go well.

What racism? Saying "a sneaky Japanese mind knows how to surprise" is called racism?
How about "A bright Japanese mind knows how to invent an advanced chip"? Also racism?
Are you for real?
Listen, spare us the ridiculous SJW rhetoric...Doesn't win you an argument, especially not of the kind like "He shot himself in the foot there".
No he didn't. Period. Cry me a river.
 

Viral

Active Member
What racism? Saying "a sneaky Japanese mind knows how to surprise" is called racism?
How about "A bright Japanese mind knows how to invent an advanced chip"? Also racism?
Are you for real?
Listen, spare us the ridiculous SJW rhetoric...Doesn't win you an argument, especially not of the kind like "He shot himself in the foot there".
No he didn't. Period. Cry me a river.
By mentioning Pearl Harbor he was talking about the “element of surprise” that the Japanese and Americans including all those involved in WW2 understand from experience.

I think some of the dudes here jumped into conclusion and made instinctive judgments based on their personal needs and expectations even before the press conference ended.

I understand many of us were more interested in knowing how he escaped rather then why he escaped. As far as I’m concerned, I heard what I needed to hear and I’m more impressed with this man than ever!

Proud to be Lebanese!
 

GrumpForTrump

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
This is proof that no matter how technologically advanced some countries are, they will forever remain 'Chins' and 'Japs'.
I trust their engineering but not their judicial system.
(South Korea is much better than China or Japan in terms of human rights cause it's a Catholic country. Why is it that whenever you bring Jesus into the mix, great things happen?)

Whether Carlos is innocent or not, the fact remains that he would have never gotten a fair trial as long as he was in Japan.
It's obvious there's more to the case than just tax evasion.
The Japanese justice system is built on torture and extortion, and, knowing Japan's xenophobia, foreigners like Carlos Ghosn are further disadvantaged.

Also, can those blaming him for having visited Israel drop their stupid charges? He's the head of Nissan. Of course he's going to visit Israel.
 

Viral

Active Member
South Korea is much better than China or Japan in terms of human rights cause it's a Catholic country
:lol:
How do they compare with the Protestants in the UK holding Julian Assange hostage? Speaking of which, I’m sure Assange will be afforded a fair trial. If he manages to escape it means he’s guilty… dah…
 

Jorje

Legendary Member
What racism? Saying "a sneaky Japanese mind knows how to surprise" is called racism?
How about "A bright Japanese mind knows how to invent an advanced chip"? Also racism?
Are you for real?
Listen, spare us the ridiculous SJW rhetoric...Doesn't win you an argument, especially not of the kind like "He shot himself in the foot there".
No he didn't. Period. Cry me a river.

I can't think of anything more disgustingly racist AND pathetic than saying a Japanese mind is "sneaky" and is good at ambush. That is essentially what you and Ghosn are claiming - making his case a consequence to some kind of an "essential" Japanese trait and then linking it to a world disaster that triggered a war and killed millions in the process.

You're the one who is crying a river with that SJW nonsense. It's not my problem if you can't see your and his racism even if it bites you in the face. Concepts have meaning and you foot the bill.
 

joseph_lubnan

Legendary Member
[email protected] the Guardian. Nothing distasteful. Meaning sneaky Japanese minds knows how to create surprise.

Anyone who feels butthurt by such words, needs a therapy or maybe a lobotomy, to remove the SJW part of his mind.

A patient and clandestine approach may very well be a strategy that Japanese culture leans towards, and tend to employ more. I do not see this as racism, but rather an observation. It may be right, it may be wrong, and such a strategy is not exclusive to the Japanese.
 

Jorje

Legendary Member
That comment actually is quite telling about the way Ghosn's mind functions. It was in response to a question about how he missed it.

He can't stomach the fact that he did not see the signs and projected his personal failure to his anti-Japanese racism. Instead, it's the sneaky, destructive "Japanese minds" that are responsible.
 

Jorje

Legendary Member
Carlos Ghosn, Mum on Tokyo Escape, Unleashes a Rambling Defense
In Beirut, the fugitive ex-Nissan chairman made his first public comments since he fled Japan at news conference and in an interview with The New York Times.



Carlos Ghosn at a news conference in Beirut on Wednesday.

Carlos Ghosn at a news conference in Beirut on Wednesday.Credit...Diego Ibarra Sanchez for The New York Times
By Ben Dooley, Vivian Yee and David Yaffe-Bellany
  • Jan. 8, 2020Updated 6:55 p.m. ET


    • 235
BEIRUT, Lebanon — It was part corporate presentation, part legal defense, part rambling tirade.
For more than two hours on Wednesday, Carlos Ghosn, the former Nissan executive who fled house arrest in Japan and surfaced in Lebanon last month, launched an impassioned defense of his decision to escape, portraying himself as the victim of a rigged justice system and a corporate coup by disloyal underlings.
By the end of the day, sitting at a conference room table with his wife, Mr. Ghosn seemed less defiant than tired. In an interview with The New York Times, he acknowledged that he had regrets. The biggest: He wished he had retired before everything unraveled.
Mr. Ghosn, who led an auto empire that spanned continents, was arrested in late 2018 and charged with financial wrongdoing. The reporters who gathered to hear him speak at a Beirut news conference had hoped for an account of his daring international escape — a dash across Japan to a chartered jet that carried him out of the country.
Instead, they were treated to a wide-ranging and sometimes hard-to-follow defense against the charges that Japanese prosecutors had leveled against him. He attacked the authorities in Tokyo as well as executives at Nissan.

Japanese prosecutors responded on Wednesday with a statement issued soon after Mr. Ghosn’s conference ended, saying that he had been deemed a flight risk, which “is obvious from the fact that he actually fled and illegally departed from the country.”

“His statements during his press conference today failed to justify his acts,” the Tokyo prosecutor’s office said.
Mr. Ghosn, speaking in English, French and Arabic during the news conference, said he was the victim of “character assassination” and “political persecution.”

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In the interview with The Times, Mr. Ghosn was mum on the details of his escape, except to say that “there is a lot of imagination” in some media accounts of his brazen flight.
Mr. Ghosn expressed optimism about his future, including the odds that he will be welcomed back into elite company. Since his arrival in Lebanon, he said, a number of prominent organizations, including an Ivy League university, have courted him for possible speaking engagements.
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“A lot of people want to get in contact with me,” he said.
Below are highlights of Mr. Ghosn’s first day speaking to the press about his arrest and escape:
Video

TRANSCRIPT

0:00/0:58
‘I Was Left With No Other Choice,’ Ghosn Says of Fleeing Japan
For the first time since he fled Japan more than a week ago, Carlos Ghosn, the former auto executive, told his story to the public.
I have not experienced a moment of freedom since Nov. 19, 2018. It is impossible, it is impossible to express the depths of that deprivation, and my profound appreciation to once again be able to be reunited with my family and loved ones. I did not escape justice. I fled injustice and persecution — political persecution. Having endured more than 400 days of inhumane treatment in a system designed to break me and unwilling to provide me even minimal justice, I was left with no other choice but to protect myself and my family. It was a difficult decision, and a risk one only takes if resigned to the impossibility of a fair trial.


00:00

0:57



0:57‘I Was Left With No Other Choice,’ Ghosn Says of Fleeing Japan
For the first time since he fled Japan more than a week ago, Carlos Ghosn, the former auto executive, told his story to the public.CreditCredit...Diego Ibarra Sanchez for The New York Times
Mr. Ghosn looks toward his ‘Mission Impossible.’
As an international fugitive, Mr. Ghosn faces an uncertain future. He is intent on clearing his name, but it is unclear what legal route he could take.
“I am used to what you call Mission Impossible,” he said at the news conference, responding to a question from a reporter about whether he will spend the rest of his life as a fugitive. He added: “I would be willing to stand trial anywhere where I think I could have a fair trial.”
Mr. Ghosn is a citizen of France, Brazil and Lebanon. Asked whether he would consider going to France, Mr. Ghosn said he was content in Lebanon. “I’m very happy to be here,” he said. “I’m with my friends, I’m with my family, my kids can come visit me. I can use the phone, I can use the internet.”
In recent days, officials in France have hardened their stance on Mr. Ghosn, calling him a “defendant like any other” and saying he should face justice in a court of law.


He treated the conference as a boardroom.
Mr. Ghosn began his speech as if he were giving a corporate presentation, promising a point-by-point defense and projecting documents onto a screen.
He outlined the minutiae of the case against him and discussed specific emails and statements to prosecutors, complete with a presentation of documents to support his argument. But there was a problem: The text was too small for anyone in the room to read.
He noted that both of his companies had fared worse without him. “By the way, the market cap decrease of Nissan is more than $10 billion,” he said. “By the way, Renault is not better. … The market cap of Renault went down by more than $5 billion.”

“As a shareholder of Nissan, I say, ‘Who is protecting me?’” he said.
Nissan ‘colluded’ with prosecutors, he said.
Mr. Ghosn pushed his theory that his arrest was the work of Nissan executives motivated by the fact that Nissan’s performance had begun to decline.
And, he said, the charge of underreporting income isn’t one that should have landed him in jail.
Mr. Ghosn has also claimed the charges against him were an effort by Nissan and Japanese officials to prevent a merger with Renault.
Taking questions from reporters, he said that rather than a merger, he had proposed creating a holding company that would have had one board of directors but allowed Nissan and Renault to continue operating as separate companies.
Mr. Ghosn says he was a victim of ‘character assassination.’
He defended a lavish party that he held at the Palace of Versailles in 2016 that has been the subject of an investigation by French prosecutors. At question is whether the party was a misuse of company money, because it coincided with Mr. Ghosn’s wedding to his second wife, Carole, and with her 50th birthday.
Mr. Ghosn said the party had emerged from a pre-existing relationship between Versailles and the auto alliance.
Still, he said, “obviously this is not a very cheap party.”
One of the major public criticisms of Mr. Ghosn has involved houses that reports have said Nissan bought for his benefit. The properties include those in Rio de Janeiro and Beirut.
On Wednesday, Mr. Ghosn argued that the houses had been bought with the assent of top officials at Nissan. He displayed documents that he said showed that Greg Kelly, his onetime lieutenant, and Hiroto Saikawa, his successor as chief executive and one of the company officials he blames for his downfall, had signed off on the purchases.

The criminal charges against Mr. Ghosn in Japan do not include the properties. But Mr. Ghosn said the accusations had been leaked as part of a Nissan smear campaign.
“This is part of the character assassination,” he said.
Carlos Ghosn May Have Spent Company Funds on Wedding Party, Renault Says
Feb. 7, 2019

Mr. Ghosn: ‘I did not escape justice. I fled injustice.’



Image
Mr. Ghosn displayed numerous documents at his news conference in Beirut.

Mr. Ghosn displayed numerous documents at his news conference in Beirut.Credit...Diego Ibarra Sanchez for The New York Times
Since his arrest, Mr. Ghosn and his family have denounced the Japanese justice system, arguing that he has been a victim of “injustice and political persecution.” His comments followed a similar line.
“I have not experienced a moment of freedom since Nov. 19, 2018,” he told the room of reporters. “It is impossible to express the depth of the aggravation and my profound appreciation once again to be able to be reunited with my family and loved ones.”
Mr. Ghosn defended his decision to flee Japan rather than face trial.
“I did not escape justice. I fled injustice and political persecution,” he said. “I was left with no other choice but to protect myself and my family.”
Mr. Ghosn also assailed his treatment by prosecutors.
Japanese officials said Mr. Ghosn’s claims were false.
Prosecutors in Tokyo issued a long statement on Wednesday saying that Mr. Ghosn’s claim of a conspiracy between them and Nissan is “categorically false and completely contrary to fact.”

The statement said Mr. Ghosn’s treatment reflected the fact that he was a flight risk.
Earlier in the day, the authorities entered the offices of Mr. Ghosn’s lawyers in Japan with a search warrant. But the law firm of Junichiro Hironaka, Mr. Ghosn’s top lawyer in Japan, said lawyers had kept the authorities from confiscating two computers that Mr. Ghosn had used.
A crush of reporters packed the news conference.
Mr. Ghosn walked with his wife, Carole, into a frenzy of camera operators in a plain white conference room in Beirut, with a burst of flash bulbs going off. Organizers were pleading with the camera operators to back off. A burly, bearded bodyguard stood next to Mr. Ghosn at the lectern.
Before he emerged, more than 100 journalists from across the world had jostled to get inside the conference room at the Lebanese Press Syndicate. A security team checked IDs and bags, and Lebanese reporters interviewed their Japanese counterparts about Mr. Ghosn’s escape from Tokyo.



Image
Mr. Ghosn arriving at the news conference on Wednesday in Beirut.

Mr. Ghosn arriving at the news conference on Wednesday in Beirut.Credit...Diego Ibarra Sanchez for The New York Times
How did Mr. Ghosn escape from Japan?
Mr. Ghosn, 65, a celebrity in Japan and a hero to many in Lebanon, oversaw a turnaround at Nissan starting in the late 1990s and had the rare position of running two major companies simultaneously: Nissan and Renault, based in France.
Born in Brazil and raised in Lebanon, Mr. Ghosnjoined Renault as an executive in the 1990s.
But his career collapsed in late 2018 when he was arrested by the Japanese authorities and later charged with underreporting his compensation and shifting personal financial losses to Nissan. Nissan had also been indicted on charges of improperly reporting Mr. Ghosn’s income — and had said it would cooperate with prosecutors.

Carlos Ghosn, Mum on Tokyo Escape, Unleashes a Rambling Defense
 
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