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CHINA and the US Conflicts of Interest: Reports and Discussions.

Viral

Active Member
Right direction for Italy. Their economy has been in the dumps since the financial crisis 10 years ago. It's a no brainer, Belt & Road will significantly enhance their trade volume with the biggest market in the world. Not sure why Washington would object to that, frankly they need to mind their own business... Moreover, Chinese investment in Italian infrastructure free of political conditions or dictates should be more than welcome. To my knowledge, all ports and airports are for sale in Italy. Anyway, this is not the first time Italy engages with China under the Belt & Road framework. In fact, Italy has participated in major B&R projects since the implementation of the Silk Road initiative in 2013.
Italy is one of the few major European counties that refuses to abide by Washington's orders to denounce Maduro's Venezuela.
 

Dynamite Joe

Well-Known Member
Italy is one of the few major European counties that refuses to abide by Washington's orders to denounce Maduro's Venezuela.

The new administration has shown remarkable independence so far. Hopefully, they will last and maintain this policy of not being bossed around...
 

proIsrael-nonIsraeli

Legendary Member

Huawei CEO says 5G tech is like ‘nuclear bomb’ for US, cautions against ‘new Cold War’

Huawei CEO says 5G tech is like ‘nuclear bomb’ for US, cautions against ‘new Cold War’


Huawei CEO Ren Zhengfei has blasted Donald Trump’s fixation on 5G competition with China, likening the technology to a “nuclear bomb” for the US president. Zhengfei also promised to support a “no-spy agreement” with Germany.
“Unfortunately, the US sees 5G technology as a strategic weapon,” Zhengfei said in an interview with German Wirtschaftswoche and Handelsblatt newspapers.
“For them it is a kind of nuclear bomb,” he added.
Speaking to the German news outlets, the CEO said his company will not install surveillance ‘backdoors’ on its 5G equipment in the country. Berlin had been hesitant to allow Huawei to participate in its upcoming 5G rollout, citing security concerns, but the country’s chief telecoms regulator said on Monday that no equipment suppliers “should or may” be excluded.
Meanwhile, Zhengfei said he would urge the Chinese government to sign a ‘no-spy agreement’ with Germany, and commit to abiding by the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).
Washington has put diplomatic pressure on Germany to shut Huawei out, after multiple US intelligence agencies warned that the company could be gathering information for Beijing. Zhengfei called these allegations “fairy tales,” and demanded the US “provide facts and evidence to support their allegations.”
President Trump for his part views the race to 5G as a strategic battle, telling reporters on Friday that the US “cannot allow any other country to out-compete the United States in this powerful industry of the future.”
In addition to stripping back regulations on US telecoms firms, Trump has also pressed other European allies to shun Chinese technology. While some, like Germany, France, and the UK, have tightened their regulatory standards, others like Italy, Croatia, and Hungary have moved to welcome Huawei.

According to the CEO: “We should focus again on economic development and create peace.”

AT&T is already promoting 5G, others are soon to follow.
 

proIsrael-nonIsraeli

Legendary Member

Trade war with China: US will make sure it causes major ruckus before losing the fight

Trade war with China: US will make sure it causes major ruckus before losing the fight


There are suggestions that the US and China may now sign a trade agreement in May. However, it seems unlikely that this will be the great victory over China that Trump promised, as recent events indicate.
Just a month ago, the European Union (EU) appeared to have jumped aboard the anti-Chinese bandwagon of the Trump administration, when it labelled Beijing a “systemic rival” over what it viewed as unfair trade practices. It also stated that it was rolling out its own strategy to counter China’s influence. While the EU is likely to want to pushback against China and counter it wherever necessary, recent developments do indicate that there is very little the EU and the US can do to scale back China’s influence without resorting to outright war, and are looking to cooperate and engage with China instead.
One such example is Italy’s recent decision to join China’s so-called Silk Road project by signing a memorandum of understanding. Italy is a G7 member, and the first G7 nation to endorse China’s Belt and Road ambitions. At the same time, Chinese and Italian firms signed 10 deals worth up to approximately $5.6 billion in the energy, steel and gas pipeline sectors. Fears from the other major players about the strengthening relationship between Italy and China were shrugged off by the Italian side, who said that opposition to its move was motivated by “jealousy.”
Another notable example is the newly signed EU-China joint statement which agreed that the two sides would “establish a political mechanism to continuously monitor the progress in the negotiations and to report to leaders by the end of the year on the progress made.” The joint statement is the next step on the pathway to the creation of an EU-China Comprehensive Investment Agreement by 2020 which is aimed at improving market access and eliminating practices that discriminate against foreign investors. Just this week, China’s ambassador to the EU, Zhang Ming, said that the EU should avoid using discriminatory practices, already concerned about the screening process currently in place.
Despite the EU’s original characterization of China as a “systemic rival,” the EU and China have essentially pledged to strengthen their trade relationship and work more closely towards opening up China’s economy to foreign investors. European Council President Donald Tusk called the joint statement a “breakthrough.” China, for its part, has issued encouraging statements of its own to keep the EU on side, stating that it would “respect European standards” and not seek to divide the EU bloc.
In reality, China knows that the Eastern European states referred to above are integral to the Silk Road project, without the inclusion of which it could never really hope to bring its ambitious initiative to fruition.
The so-called Beijing-led “16+1”, which involves 16 post-socialist states including eleven other EU members and five countries which are currently undergoing accession to the EU, is another interesting development to keep an eye on as the years go by. These smaller states are giving the EU greater say over ongoing deals with China in order to mitigate the concerns that major European powers have about Beijing’s expanding influence. According to some sources in this year’s negotiations on the 16+1 joint statement, each completed draft was seen by EU officials in Brussels prior to signing.
Even major players such as France have struggled to resist the opportunities that China presents. At the end of last month, Chinese President Xi Jinping visited France and met with Emmanuel Macron, signing several deals worth billions of euros. Prior to the visit, Xi wrote an op-ed in the conservative outlet Le Figaro compelling French companies to join its Silk Road project.
Instead, much of the major opposition to the gravitational pull of China’s Silk Road project comes from Germany.
German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas said recently: “In a world with giants like China, Russia or our partners in the United States, we can only survive if we are united as the EU… if some countries believe they can do clever business with the Chinese, then they will be surprised when they wake up and find themselves dependent.
Of course, the real perpetrator of the anti-Chinese trade perspective remains the Trump administration. But even its position on this appears to be slowly but surely falling apart. Just recently, US negotiators allegedly decided not to fixate on demands for China to curb industrial subsidies as a condition for its trade deal due to strong opposition from Beijing.
The reason China apparently pushed back is because industrial subsidies are connected directly to the Chinese government’s industrial policy. As Reuters explains, Beijing grants subsidies and tax breaks to state-owned firms and to other sectors that the government views as strategically important for Chinese development.
Here’s the thing though: if Washington stuck to its position on this issue, it would hit Beijing exactly where it hurts. So, if it isn’t prepared to go through with it and truly challenge the Chinese government in its most vulnerable areas, then what is the point? Why act tough on China and then, when it comes to crunchtime, do the complete opposite?
According to Reuters’ sources, it all comes down to Washington’s desire to secure a deal within the upcoming months. Therefore, US negotiators are focussing more on areas which are considered more achievable.
At the end of the day, the Trump administration is more interested in creating a new deal that it can flaunt as its own, but it won’t actually be a document that has any teeth or demonstrate any significant victory over China. As Fortune explains, “it’s tough to see what the Chinese side will agree to beyond promises to buy more US goods, given that it denies allegations of misbehaviour that include forcing foreign companies to hand over their technology.”
One source also told Reuters: “Whatever deal we get, it’s going to be better than what we’ve had, and it’s not going to be sufficient for some people. But that’s politics.
Right now, indications seem to suggest that the US and China will have a deal signed by late May. After approximately nine months of a trade war which has essentially gotten no one anywhere and has in some cases hit US companies harder than Washington would like to admit, perhaps the whole notion of a trade war with China being a viable pathway forward will eventually disappear. The Interim Economic Outlook published in March by the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) showed that the global economy had taken a pretty hard hit due to Trump’s trade war; and seems unlikely to recover quickly even if a trade agreement is reached in the not-so-distant future.
Tying it all together, the OECD report warned that new restrictions in specific trade-sensitive sectors such as cars and car parts “would hit Europe particularly, where motor vehicle exports represent around one-tenth of total EU merchandise exports to the United States and there are significant supply-chain linkages that spread the impact widely across countries and sectors.
President and CEO of the Atlantic Council Frederick Kempe wrote an op-ed for CNBC in which he essentially asks the US and the EU to come together to influence China’s ascent on the global stage. According to Kempe, China’s rise to power requires either an engagement or a containment strategy, yet the EU and the US have offered neither, which has produced the worst of all worlds.
Op-eds like Kempe’s start to make a lot more sense when viewed in the light of recent developments which show that the issue is not that the US and the EU have not deployed a containment strategy; rather, the blunt truth is that such a containment strategy was doomed to fail from the outset.
Whether the trade war falls flat on its face or escalates into something far more sinister, the fight between the US and China is much larger than the maintenance of Donald Trump’s ego. As Fortune put it, the “fight is also about who gets to set the rules for the global economy of the future.”
You can bet therefore, that Washington will do everything in its power to ensure that this is not a fight it loses without causing a major ruckus first.

At the moment USA has smallest deficit in trade with China, Chinese imports have decreased by about 21% (if I am not mistaking).
 

Viral

Active Member

Now Game of Drones? US firms ‘warned’ against Chinese UAVs
Published time: 20 May, 2019 21:27

Now Game of Drones? US firms ‘warned’ against Chinese UAVs
<img src="https://cdni.rt.com/files/2019.05/xxs/5ce316cedda4c8fd138b45ed.JPG" class="media__item " alt="Now Game of Drones? US firms ‘warned’ against Chinese UAVs" />
 

Viral

Active Member

Huawei pledges to continue Android device support after rebuff from Google
Published time: 20 May, 2019

Huawei pledges to continue Android device support after rebuff from Google


<img src="https://cdni.rt.com/files/2019.05/xxs/5ce2ac5fdda4c88b6f8b45ed.jpg" class="media__item " alt="Huawei pledges to continue Android device support after rebuff from Google" /><span class="fr-marker" style="line-height: 0; display: none;" data-type="true" data-id="0"></span><span class="fr-marker" style="line-height: 0; display: none;" data-type="false" data-id="0"></span>
Huawei will continue to provide security updates and after-sales services to all existing Huawei and Honor smartphone and tablet products, covering those that have been sold and that are still in stock globally.
 

Viral

Active Member

Huawei has long been ready for US ban & won’t bow to pressure, CEO says

Huawei has long been ready for US ban & won’t bow to pressure, CEO says
<img src="https://cdni.rt.com/files/2019.05/xxs/5ce11a12fc7e9344328b458f.JPG" class="media__item " alt="Huawei has long been ready for US ban & won’t bow to pressure, CEO says" />
 

Viral

Active Member

Huawei’s Own Smartphone Operating System Reportedly Named HongMeng OS, According to Foreign Sources

Huawei HongMeng OS for smartphones
In an aggressive move and with the snap of its fingers, the U.S. blacklist order forced Google to cease its business partnership with Huawei. This effectively means that no smartphones or tablets launched by Huawei will have access to Google’s Play Store and its long list of official applications. Huawei’s handsets will still be supported by the Android Open Source Project (AOSP), but it will hardly be enough to convince customers to continue using devices without an existing app repository.
Huawei claims that they were anticipating that such a move would be made, and they’ve taken the necessary steps to make sure that the effects of this blow are mitigated as much as possible. One of those steps would be to develop its own smartphone operating system, which reportedly has a name now.

HongMeng OS From Huawei Is Reportedly in the Trial Phase and Rumored to Gradually Replace Android
According to a tweet from Global Times, with the rumor originating from three Chinese media reports, HongMeng OS could be the name given to Huawei’s mobile operating system. During Huawei’s initial statement shortly after the Android ban, the company attempted to put on its ‘brave face’, and stated that it will continue to ‘build a safe and sustainable software ecosystem’. The term ‘sustainable’ could possibly mean that in the event the Android ban is not reversed, Huawei will proceed to launching its own OS catered for mobile phones.
During its Q1 2019 earnings, Huawei reported revenue of $26.8 billion, with 59 million smartphones sold, the company has shown that its mobile division is a money-making business and abandoning it isn’t a choice. Initially, we reported that Huawei’s own mobile platform would be called Kirin OS, while also stating that since talking about the aforementioned rumor, there hasn’t been a follow-up concerning the name of the platform, but here we are, talking about a different name.

Huawei’s mobile CEO Richard Yu hasn’t publicly spoken about the name, and a different executive has highlighted the challenges of making your own operating system. One of them will be providing incentives to developers and giving them encouragement to start making apps for this platform, thus breaking free of the Android platform. With Google no longer doing business with Huawei, the latter might have switched to the fifth gear in development of HongMeng OS.
However, we’d advise taking this news with a pinch of salt for now, and we’ll be back with more updates surrounding Huawei. We suspect things will get a whole lot interesting now, so sit back, and stay tuned.
 

Viral

Active Member
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Beijing vows tit-for-tat sanctions & says retaliation INEVITABLE unless US changes course after Trump signs new HK legislation
15 Jul, 2020
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FILE PHOTO: Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian attends a news conference in Beijing, China. © Reuters / Carlos Garcia Rawlins

China said it would impose sanctions on the US after US President Donald Trump signed legislation to punish Beijing for “oppressive acts” in Hong Kong and an executive order ending all preferential treatment for the city.
"The US law...maliciously denigrates Hong Kong's national security legislation, threatens to impose sanctions on China, and seriously violates international law and basic rules of international relations. It is gross interference in Hong Kong affairs and China's internal affairs," China's Foreign Ministry said in a scathing rebuke to Trump's announcement earlier on Tuesday that he had signed the so-called “Hong Kong Autonomy Act” into law.
Apart from the Act, which envisions sanctions against politicians who the US has accused of "extinguishing" the former British colony's freedom with a new national security law, Trump also signed an executive order stripping the territory of its special trading status.
ALSO ON RT.COM‘If they want to do business with us, they can’t use it’: Trump says he PERSONALLY badgered US allies into ditching Huawei
Both the Autonomy Act – a bill that blazed through Congress with bipartisan support – and the executive order seek to penalize Beijing for alleged rights abuses in Hong Kong.
Beijing, which insists that the new security law was needed to "protect national sovereignty," has denounced the US rhetoric and punitive measures as an attempt to "obstruct" the implementation of the law, insisting the US "will never succeed" in pursuit of that goal.
The Ministry said China would not sit idly by and warned it would respond in kind.
In order to safeguard its own legitimate interests, China will make the necessary response and impose sanctions on relevant US personnel and entities
Published on Tuesday evening, Trump’s order will “suspend or eliminate different and preferential treatment for Hong Kong,” including in the realms of national security, foreign policy, immigration and economics, rescinding a special arrangement established with the city under the 1992 Hong Kong Policy Act. The previous law allowed Washington to treat Hong Kong as a separate entity from Mainland China, especially in matters of trade.
Beijing has repeatedly demanded that the US refrain from meddling in its internal affairs, saying that if Washington fails to back down – which, so far, it has shown no intention of doing – retaliation would be swift.
Hong Kong affairs are purely China's internal affairs, and no foreign country has the right to interfere… If the US side sticks to its will, China will definitely respond.
Tensions between Washington and Beijing have soared over the last year, with the US rolling out a steady drumbeat of allegations and policies targeting China, including a trade spat which nearly erupted into a tariff war, claims of rights abuses in Hong Kong and Xinjiang, the routine deployment of military assets near disputed territories in the South China Sea and accusing Beijing of concealing information about the coronavirus in the early stages of the outbreak. Though China has denied each allegation in turn, the flurry of hostile rhetoric and actions has prompted Beijing to retaliate in some cases, most recently barring multiple US lawmakers from entering the country following a similar move by Washington.
 

Viral

Active Member

China’s Huawei is now the world’s largest smartphone maker
30 Jul, 2020
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Huawei overtook Samsung and Apple in the second quarter of 2020 to become the biggest smartphone player in the world for the first time.
That’s according to a new report by Canalys which showed that the majority of sales came from China while its international business suffers as a result of US sanctions.
The Chinese vendor shipped 55.8 million devices, down five percent year on year. Meanwhile, South Korea’s Samsung (which is second in China sales) shipped 53.7 million smartphones, a 30 percent plunge versus the same period last year.

Overall, smartphone shipments in international markets plunged 27 percent year-on-year in the April to June quarter.
Statistics showed that Huawei sold over 70 percent of its smartphones in mainland China in the second quarter. In Europe (a key region for Huawei) the company’s smartphone market share dropped sharply to 16 percent in the second quarter versus 22 percent in the same period in 2019. According to Counterpoint Research, Huawei is the third-largest smartphone maker in Europe behind Samsung and Apple.

Analysts say that given the massive population of China, success there often spurs companies to a large “global” market share.
“It will be hard for Huawei to maintain its lead in the long term,” said analyst at Canalys Mo Jia. “Its major channel partners in key regions, such as Europe, are increasingly wary of ranging Huawei devices, taking on fewer models, and bringing in new brands to reduce risk.”
The analyst added that “Strength in China alone will not be enough to sustain Huawei at the top once the global economy starts to recover.”
The growth in shipments comes as Huawei struggles to do international business amid pressure from the United States. In 2019, the Chinese tech company was placed on the US Entity List, which restricted its access to American technology.
Thus, Huawei could not use licensed Google Android on its latest flagship devices. The company was forced to release its own operating system called HarmonyOS last year.
 
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