Christian-Muslim Relations In the Middle-East

Ice Tea

Ice Tea

Active Member
Do you really feel Lebanese Christians are dissapearing?

Unfortunately. You can see the Muslim influence growing in places like Zahle, Baabda, Byblos. Hezbollah is doing what they can to resettle Shias all over Christian areas, building mosques etc. Christians right now are probably responsible for only 20% of all births in Lebanon. The demographic changes Lebanon will undergo in the next 20 years will be the will be the most significant since the country was created. Shias and Sunnis alone already outnumber all Christians. The way I see Lebanon is set to become a mini Iraq - Shias and Sunnis fighting for power, while Christians and Druze will be the equivalent of Assyrians and Yazidis.
 
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  • SAVO

    SAVO

    Member
    Unfortunately. You can see the Muslim influence growing in places like Zahle, Baabda, Byblos. Hezbollah is doing what they can to resettle Shias all over Christian areas, building mosques etc. Christians right now are probably responsible for only 20% of all births in Lebanon. The demographic changes Lebanon will undergo in the next 20 years will be the will be the most significant since the country was created. Shias and Sunnis alone already outnumber all Christians. The way I see Lebanon is set to become a mini Iraq - Shias and Sunnis fighting for power, while Christians and Druze will be the equivalent of Assyrians and Yazidis.
    only sort of neutral federalism with the possibility of commerce with the surrounding areas culd be the solution to preserve the integrity of the christian community ..

    shias since the 80's expressed their loyalty to syria al Baath ,. and they were the 5th column of the syrian occupation in lebanon .. now they have the chance to make their dream come true and become part of syria..
    as for sunnies,, they always felt part of arabic muslim ummah.. and they are etnically very close to the syrian sunni than to non sunni lebanese,.. tripoli used to be called tripoli al sham . but now their situation is really bad unless the turks invade the northern part of syria or declare a sunni imara n the north which i think is a bit difficult due to the hge presence of non sunni there .. unless they start a transfer proejct with land xchange ..
     
    NewLeb

    NewLeb

    New Member
    1400 years of being seen as kuffars and treated as dhimmis. The middle east went from 100% Christian to like what 1%. Christians of Iraq? Gone. Syrian Christians? Gone. Copts? Attacked and humiliated everyday. Lebanese Christians? Disappearing. The only Middle Eastern country where the Christian population is actually GROWING is Israel.
    Funny how you bring up Israel. The Jews had to fight like monsters to build and retain their state (and still do to this day).

    This is the Middle East, sonny. If Christians want to sing kumbayya and Jesus loves me around a campfire, well, hek ma byemshil hal. ;)

    BTW, the overwhelming reason why Christians leave Lebanon and the ME in general is because of economic reasons. Why don’t you blame them for selling their land to Saudi Arabians?
     
    Frisbeetarian

    Frisbeetarian

    Legendary Member
    1400 years of being seen as kuffars and treated as dhimmis. The middle east went from 100% Christian to like what 1%. Christians of Iraq? Gone. Syrian Christians? Gone. Copts? Attacked and humiliated everyday. Lebanese Christians? Disappearing. The only Middle Eastern country where the Christian population is actually GROWING is Israel.
    Christians never constituted 50% of the population of the region let alone 100%. The only regions you had near total homogeneity was Europe and the Americas where Christians made sure to eradicate the natives and all other minorities.

    But of course the dichotomy Muslims/Christians is faulty and entirely too simplistic to explain historical events. I'm just using to get a point across to you.
     
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    The_FPMer

    The_FPMer

    Active Member
    Have you heard of the Sassanian Empire? Ever heard of Egypt? Ever heard of the fact that the majority of the subjects of the Byzantine Empire weren't Christians?

    "By the 7th century the majority of the population of the Middle East was Christian, and Byzantium was one of the two great powers when Muhammad was born."


    "How did the ancient Middle East transform from a majority-Christian world to the majority-Muslim world we know today, and what role did violence play in this process? These questions lie at the heart of Christian Martyrs under Islam: Religious Violence and the Making of the Muslim World (Princeton University Press), a new book by associate professor of Islamic history Christian C. Sahner. In a guest post for Arts Blog, Professor Sahner, from Oxford's Faculty of Oriental Studies, explores his findings."


    "A century ago, 20% of the population in the region was Christian. Today Christians account for only about 5% and their numbers are still dwindling."
     
    Rafidi

    Rafidi

    Legendary Member
    Easy for you to say. Muslims don`t face an EXISTENTIAL threat in the Middle East like Christians do. When a hostile and violent majority comes to us talking about how their religion is the right one and 'we testify this and prophet that', for us as a persecuted minority, they are no different than ISIS or al-qaeda.

    It`s funny, all those people I posted also post about adha and ramadan to congratulate Muslims during their holidays. But apparently that`s not enough for them. It`s funny, Muslims love to quote that 'Christians/Jews won`t be satisfied until we follow their religion`, but we don`t insult them on their pages. Nor do we even care about that, all we want is to be left alone. Now you won`t find a Christian page on fb where you won`t see a muslim `testifying` about their religion and insulting us on literally every publication. Not even online we have peace.
    All
    We
    Their
    Wont find
    Those people
    Wont see
    Us

    All your posts are about us vs them.

    There are Muslims wishing Christians well on the same links you posted.

    Besides, there are people who react the same way when it is Ashura period. They post images of the 0.1% Shia who self flagellate and use that to paint Ashura. They also post offensive comments and go as far as saying Imam Hussein dont need your tears etc.

    Everyone has his own beliefs and ways and some people are intolerant and cant keep their mouth quiet.

    When it comes to Easter, it is mainly what sets Islam and Christianity apart. Different paths on the concept of salvation and Muslims believe Jesus "was neither killed nor crucified" as per the Holy Quran. Just as those Christian celebrities believe Jesus was killed and crucified, others don't believe that. Everyone is free to express himself as he likes.

    Therefore, I didn't read any threatening statements or posts on those links. All I read were statements that disagree with a certain belief. Except if you want me to read 10,000 comments to find a threatening remark. I dont have the patience of @Joe tayyar

    Personally, on Easter, I dont find it good to wish anyone. It is different on Christmas. Even though Jesus was not born on Christmas, Muslims (with the exception of Salafists/Wahhabis) also feel they can be happy and rejoice on the symbolic birthday commemoration of Jesus, who is regarded as one of the main prophets of Islam. Even when someone wish me on Easter (most times through online messages), I either ignore or I simply thank them. I dont exchange wishes.
     
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    Frisbeetarian

    Frisbeetarian

    Legendary Member

    "By the 7th century the majority of the population of the Middle East was Christian, and Byzantium was one of the two great powers when Muhammad was born."


    "How did the ancient Middle East transform from a majority-Christian world to the majority-Muslim world we know today, and what role did violence play in this process? These questions lie at the heart of Christian Martyrs under Islam: Religious Violence and the Making of the Muslim World (Princeton University Press), a new book by associate professor of Islamic history Christian C. Sahner. In a guest post for Arts Blog, Professor Sahner, from Oxford's Faculty of Oriental Studies, explores his findings."


    "A century ago, 20% of the population in the region was Christian. Today Christians account for only about 5% and their numbers are still dwindling."
    How does that prove anything? What are we to deduce of the population of the region since Persian Empires controlled the entirety of the region for centuries? The fact that the Byzantine Empire controlled a large portion of the region for a duration of time does not magically make the region 100% or even 50% Christian. The fact that Christians appeared and built an organized religion around their faith does not automagically entitle them to the entirety of the region and it certainly does not entitle them to erase the history of the multitude of different peoples of different faiths, beliefs and cultures that have inhabited the region for millenia. It flew in Europe, it ain't gonna fly here.
     
    The_FPMer

    The_FPMer

    Active Member
    The fact that the Byzantine Empire controlled a large portion of the region for a duration of time does not magically make the region 100% or even 50% Christian.
    I have provided ample proof that the Middle East's inhabitants before Islam were majority Christian, if you refuse to accept that truth because it bothers you that's something else completely.

    "By the 7th century the majority of the population of the Middle East was Christian, and Byzantium was one of the two great powers when Muhammad was born."

    "How did the ancient Middle East transform from a majority-Christian world to the majority-Muslim world we know today"
     
    CitizenOfTheRepublic

    CitizenOfTheRepublic

    Legendary Member
    All
    We
    Their
    Wont find
    Those people
    Wont see
    Us

    All your posts are about us vs them.

    There are Muslims wishing Christians well on the same links you posted.

    Besides, there are people who react the same way when it is Ashura period. They post images of the 0.1% Shia who self flagellate and use that to paint Ashura. They also post offensive comments and go as far as saying Imam Hussein dont need your tears etc.

    Everyone has his own beliefs and ways and some people are intolerant and cant keep their mouth quiet.

    When it comes to Easter, it is mainly what sets Islam and Christianity apart. Different paths on the concept of salvation and Muslims believe Jesus "was neither killed nor crucified" as per the Holy Quran. Just as those Christian celebrities believe Jesus was killed and crucified, others don't believe that. Everyone is free to express himself as he likes.

    Therefore, I didn't read any threatening statements or posts on those links. All I read were statements that disagree with a certain belief. Except if you want me to read 10,000 comments to find a threatening remark. I dont have the patience of @Joe tayyar

    Personally, on Easter, I dont find it good to wish anyone. It is different on Christmas. Even though Jesus was not born on Christmas, Muslims (with the exception of Salafists/Wahhabis) also feel they can be happy and rejoice on the symbolic birthday commemoration of Jesus, who is regarded as one of the main prophets of Islam. Even when someone wish me on Easter (most times through online messages), I either ignore or I simply thank them. I dont exchange wishes.
    I’m curious and not really debating, but why do you not find it good to say “I wish you a happy Easter” to anyone that celebrates it? Mind you there is nothing wrong to thank whomever wishes you a happy Easter and say you don’t celebrate it.
     
    The_FPMer

    The_FPMer

    Active Member
    The fact that Christians appeared and built an organized religion around their faith does not automagically entitle them to the entirety of the region and it certainly does not entitle them to erase the history of the multitude of different peoples of different faiths, beliefs and cultures that have inhabited the region for millenia. It flew in Europe, it ain't gonna fly here.
    Al-Foutou7at and Arabism did exactly that.
     
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