Christians, who do you feel closest to?

As Christians, who do you feel closest to?


  • Total voters
    10
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  • Ice Tea

    Ice Tea

    Active Member
    I'm gonna go ahead and say it. Some brothers are shy.

    Jamaica is a good addition to the poll.
    All groups in the poll (except Muslims and Russians) are historically related to Lebanese Christians. But I added them because some Orthodox might feel close to Russia and some dhimmis might feel close to Leb Muslims.
     
    fidelio

    fidelio

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    All groups in the poll (except Muslims and Russians) are historically related to Lebanese Christians. But I added them because some Orthodox might feel close to Russia and some dhimmis might feel close to Leb Muslims.
    Good thing you explained your methodology. Some unlearned and unacademic members might not have seen through the intricacy of your work. Allah be praised and alhamdoulillah you are this mericulous.
     
    Dr. Eggnog

    Dr. Eggnog

    Nuclear Egg Expert
    Orange Room Supporter
    Funny, but all the Christians who voted, chose either 'other Levantine Christians' or 'other/none of the above' and probably feel close only to Lebanese Christians. NONE feels close to Lebanese Muslims.
    All SEVEN of them?!

    Edit: Of which you are one, of course. And of course, you voted Israellis. Nice.
     
    Ice Tea

    Ice Tea

    Active Member
    Good thing you explained your methodology. Some unlearned and unacademic members might not have seen through the intricacy of your work. Allah be praised and alhamdoulillah you are this mericulous.
    Good think you understood. Now please, if you're not Christian, get off the thread. Thanks.
     
    Indie

    Indie

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Indie dear, you seem to be a really sweet and kind person and indeed a devout Christian, but I have to be blunt with you: that doesn't work with Muslims.

    I'm saying this thinking about you and the people who love you. You have to be extremely careful and cautious, please. That Muslims as a whole hate all Christians is no secret, but they nourish an even DEEPER hatred towards Oriental Christians, and unfortunately Armenians are among the most hated ones.

    According to their perverted minds, Armenians 'won'. Even despite the genocide, and the fact that modern-day Armenia is less than 1/10th of historical Armenia, Armenians still have a country. And that's unacceptable for them, they think Armenians should be living like the old Ottoman days or like modern Middle Eastern Christians.

    I was horrified when an ex-Muslim Lebanese told me all of those things, and that 'reconquering' Yerevan is a top priority for the Ummah. He told me all the Muslims he knows think exactly like that. So this is why I'm telling you this, you have to be careful for you and your loved ones.
    I always differentiate between individuals and group dynamics.

    Perhaps there is some misunderstanding due to the wording of your question: to me, the word "close" is something I associate with individuals, not groups.

    There are individual Muslims I have known for years and even decades. I trust them and get along with them better than some Christian individuals. Perhaps it's because they are Muslim in name only. They are not believers, so they don't see me or treat me as a "non-believer." I have seen nothing but love and kindness from them, and the feelings are mutual.

    However, personal friendships are one thing, and group dynamics are another. The existence of people like my "Muslim" friends is real, but so is the existence of Muslims who hate me and would harm me to serve their ideological agenda.

    I can appreciate the former, without being naive enough to trust the latter.
     
    Last edited:
    Indie

    Indie

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    I'm lucky to have many people in my life who I consider close, and I'm also lucky to have quite a few who are Muslim or Druze. Getting to know them and growing up with them helped me gain a lot of perspective during my late teens and early twenties. It helped me realize that people are different, but that that difference is something to be celebrated and not feared. It helped me understand how different people living wildly different lives can still come together, coexist and learn from each other.

    It helped me avoid becoming close-minded, fearful and angry. It helped me gain understanding and compassion. I go to Saida or Sour and I see friends there. I go to Tripoli and I see family there. I go to the Bekaa and I feel like I'm home.

    I'm not voting in your embarassment of a poll, and I encourage everybody else not to as well. People like you are hateful and pathetic, and I'm not feeding your agenda. If it were up to me, there would be no place in Lebanon for people like you, until you change your way of thinking.
    You are condemning what you consider to be a type of extremism, but your stance is the other extreme.

    Of course we shouldn't hate other people; but, we shouldn't avoid the uncomfortable reality that some of them hold dangerous and hateful beliefs that are incompatible with our values.
     
    Dr. Eggnog

    Dr. Eggnog

    Nuclear Egg Expert
    Orange Room Supporter
    You are condemning what you consider to be a type of extremism, but your stance is the other extreme.

    Of course we shouldn't hate other people; but, we shouldn't avoid the uncomfortable reality that some of them hold dangerous and hateful beliefs that are incompatible with our values.
    I never denied the existence of those people, but I definitely do disagree with the assumption that such people can be identified purely on the basis of their religion.

    The values that define me do not belong or stem from any religion. Those who practice the same religion I was born into can be just as dangerous for me and incompatible with me as any person practicing any other religion. I am acutely aware of them, of course, as I see them around me every day.

    Regardless, living in hate and fear of your compatriots because they happen to be of another religion because there are some bad people in the world associated with said religion is incredibly miopic and counter-productive. As rational human beings in a time of crisis, our first instinct should be to focus on the things that unite us for the sake of the greater good and our shared future, gradually overcoming our differences through dialog and understanding. For me, the thoughts expressed by this person are a direct contradiction of this. I personally consider them just as dangerous as any extremist ideology that calls for my head.
     
    Ice Tea

    Ice Tea

    Active Member
    I always differentiate between individuals and group dynamics.

    Perhaps there is some misunderstanding due to the wording of your question: to me, the word "close" is something I associate with individuals, not groups.

    There are individual Muslims I have known for years and even decades. I trust them and get along with them better than some Christian individuals. Perhaps it's because they are Muslim in name only. They are not believers, so they don't see me or treat me as a "non-believer." I have seen nothing but love and kindness from them, and the feelings are mutual.

    However, personal friendships are one thing, and group dynamics are another. The existence of people like my "Muslim" friends is real, but so is the existence of Muslims who hate me and would harm me to serve their ideological agenda.

    I can appreciate the former, without being naive enough to trust the latter.
    Like you yourself said, your 'Muslim' friends are not really Muslims anymore. I have plenty of ex-Muslims friends myself, they inform me a lot of the horror that Islam is. That's why I admire them so much for leaving the cult

    Now, a real and religious Muslim wants you, me and any non-Muslim DEAD.
     
    Joe tayyar

    Joe tayyar

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Did you forget the 500k Lebanese Muslims who marched into Christian suburbs chanting 'DEATH TO CHRISTIANS' during the Mohammed cartoon incident?

    There you go, that's your AVERAGE Lebanese Muslim.
    Mish holeh li al 3announ geagea that you support, these are our allies.
     
    Aoune32!

    Aoune32!

    Well-Known Member
    @Ice Tea
    Due to I being Roum Orthodox I feel that Russia represents me in the world. Would I go to war for it hell NO. But as the biggest Orthodox church is in Russia and contains half of the Orthodox population world wide most Orthodox people around the world look up to Russia.

    Second, you won't believe it but I feel closer to sunni muslims in Tripoli. Their religion is different yes. Their lifestyle is different yes. But the traditions in the north are similar. We go to one another's places for Ramadan or for Easter. We have the same language and dialect so you feel closer to them than people who are from Keserwen masalan who look @ u weird because you speak in the Tripoli accent.

    They participate in the Zambo in Al Mina.

    understand?
     
    Ice Tea

    Ice Tea

    Active Member
    @Ice Tea
    Due to I being Roum Orthodox I feel that Russia represents me in the world. Would I go to war for it hell NO. But as the biggest Orthodox church is in Russia and contains half of the Orthodox population world wide most Orthodox people around the world look up to Russia.

    Second, you won't believe it but I feel closer to sunni muslims in Tripoli. Their religion is different yes. Their lifestyle is different yes. But the traditions in the north are similar. We go to one another's places for Ramadan or for Easter. We have the same language and dialect so you feel closer to them than people who are from Keserwen masalan who look @ u weird because you speak in the Tripoli accent.

    They participate in the Zambo in Al Mina.

    understand?
    Hbb, how can you say something like that? Tripoli Sunnis are overwhelmingly ISIS and Al-qaeda supporters. Heck, there was a party in Tripoli when 9/11 happened. They celebrated each massacre of Christians and Yazidis that took place in Iraq and Syria. They literally want you DEAD. It's not safe to wear a cross in Tripoli.

    The fact they participate in Zambo, a CHRISTIAN tradition, only shows they don't have a culture of their own and are trying to culturally usurp Christian ones.

    The ONLY non-Christian people you can trust in Tripoli are the Alawites, whose religion is heavily Christian-influenced itself.
     
    The Blind Monk

    The Blind Monk

    Your will, my hands.
    Orange Room Supporter
    Hbb, how can you say something like that? Tripoli Sunnis are overwhelmingly ISIS and Al-qaeda supporters. Heck, there was a party in Tripoli when 9/11 happened. They celebrated each massacre of Christians and Yazidis that took place in Iraq and Syria. They literally want you DEAD. It's not safe to wear a cross in Tripoli.

    The fact they participate in Zambo, a CHRISTIAN tradition, only shows they don't have a culture of their own and are trying to culturally usurp Christian ones.

    The ONLY non-Christian people you can trust in Tripoli are the Alawites, whose religion is heavily Christian-influenced itself.
    Overwhelmingly? You obviously haven't been to tripoli. Like ever.
     
    Aoune32!

    Aoune32!

    Well-Known Member
    Hbb, how can you say something like that? Tripoli Sunnis are overwhelmingly ISIS and Al-qaeda supporters. Heck, there was a party in Tripoli when 9/11 happened. They celebrated each massacre of Christians and Yazidis that took place in Iraq and Syria. They literally want you DEAD. It's not safe to wear a cross in Tripoli.

    The fact they participate in Zambo, a CHRISTIAN tradition, only shows they don't have a culture of their own and are trying to culturally usurp Christian ones.

    The ONLY non-Christian people you can trust in Tripoli are the Alawites, whose religion is heavily Christian-influenced itself.
    You obviously dont know Tripoli.
    The majority of people from Tripoli and just poor people trying to live in this jungle. Out of a population of ~ 350K you find 3-5K extremists the rest just trying to make a living and dont really care about what is happening.

    Second the Zambo is a christian tradition but is celebrated by the muslims in Al Mina only not Tripoli. We as people from Mina dont say we are from Tripoli. we have our own baladiye, our own red cross, our own police etc. our city has a population of 150K people.

    Thirdly, the Alawites. have u been to Tripoli? You can trust Alawites? la2 hbb. they used to
    fire their weapons at Tripoli city and then run off to Zgharta. Baal Mohsen is just a syrian state in Tripoli.

    You can trust Alawites can u??
     
    Nonan

    Nonan

    Well-Known Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    You can put people who speak the same language and share the same nationality together and they will coexit for some time. But if their version of their country differs so starkly, it is inevitable that at some point politics will get in the way and civil war becomes inexorable. There's a pattern to this since a millennia. W hayde excluding the big elephant in the room, birth rates, regional aid to some sects in the millions of dollars, and concerted land buying.
    Do you think Lebanese differ from each other more than a liberal democrat from Manhattan differs from a hard core Trump supporter from West Virginia ?
     
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