Church bells: New nasheed for Kata2ib Imam Ali's Christian members

  • Advertisement
  • Jo

    Administrator
    Master Penguin
    #2
    Iraq Assyrians Train to Recapture Homes From IS

    (AFP) -- With wooden crosses around their necks and others tattooed on their arms, several dozen Iraqi Christians are training to recapture their homes overrun by the Islamic State jihadist group. A year ago, IS launched a fierce offensive in northern Iraq, quickly capturing second city Mosul, with its large Christian minority, and Christian-populated areas in the surrounding Nineveh province.

    Residents were given the choice of converting to Islam, paying a tax to continue practising their faith, or death.

    Thousands fled, but some want to fight back, and are now training at a military base near the Baghdad airport.

    They have Shia Muslim fighters instructing them on how to use their Kalashnikov assault rifles and on the basics of combat manoeuvres, but they are vocal in their Christianity on parade, chanting Ya Mariam (O Mary) in cadence as they march in a salute to the mother of Jesus.

    "We heard that the Christians had an opportunity for jihad (holy war), and we all came and volunteered," said 17-year-old Chaldean Christian Frank Samir.

    "Our children are dying; our Christian families were displaced. How do we ourselves accept that people say the Christians are not fighting? On the contrary, we want to fight everywhere," he said.

    Samir is from Baghdad, but most of the Christians in the "Ketaeb Babylon" unit are from Mosul.

    The IS assault was the latest in a long series of disasters for Iraqi Christians, who have repeatedly been attacked by jihadists since the 2003 overthrow of dictator Saddam Hussein, pushing hundreds of thousands to flee abroad.

    "I did not hesitate to volunteer with my brothers to fight Daesh," said Fares Issa, 38, using an Arabic acronym for IS.

    "I will continue fighting (them) until the liberation of Mosul and their expulsion from all the areas of Iraq," said Issa, who sold cars in Mosul before the conflict began.

    Both Christian and Muslim religious symbols are displayed at the training area. These include a large cross affixed to a concrete blast wall and banners reading "God is greatest" and "There is no god but God," the first part of the Muslim testament of faith.

    The training courses -- of which this is the ninth -- last only two weeks.

    But this is far too little time to turn new recruits into competent fighters able to face the battle-hardened jihadists, many of whom have years of experience fighting in Iraq and neighbouring Syria.

    "The main aim of forming our forces is the liberation of Mosul," said Rayan al-Kaldani, the secretary general of Ketaeb Babylon.

    "We took part in the operations to liberate the city of Tikrit and other operations, including Baiji, in Salaheddin province," he said, referring to major battles north of Baghdad.

    According to Kaldani, the Christians fight under the command of Abu Mahdi al-Mohandis, one of the top commanders in the "Popular Mobilisation" forces, an umbrella organisation mainly made up of Shiite fighters.

    Baghdad turned to the Popular Mobilisation forces, which are dominated by Iranian-backed Shiite militias, after the security forces suffered a series of disastrous defeats by IS last year.

    According to another Ketaeb Babylon commander, who declined to be named, there are "hundreds of Christian fighters located now in various areas of Salaheddin... in addition to others responsible for protecting churches in Baghdad province."

    Recruitment of other volunteers to "fight the Daesh terrorist organisation" is continuing, he said.

    A man who gave his name as Hajji Ali, a leader of one of the Shiite units overseeing the training, said it "focuses on close-quarters combat, unconventional warfare and war inside the cities."

    "Their eyes are on Mosul and the areas occupied by Daesh," Hajji Ali said of the Christian fighters.

    The volunteers say Mosul is the main goal, but their fight is not limited to that city.

    Mosul "is our first aim," said 16-year-old Raymoun Salwan, who was displaced from the city.

    But "I will continue to fight terrorism wherever it goes in Iraq and every place," he said.

    Source: Iraq Assyrians Train to Recapture Homes From IS
     
    #4
    paying a tax to continue practising their faith
    This is absurd - literally taking us back to the caliphate days. Maybe that was their aim.

    As for the actual topic in hand, prayers going to those who are fighting for their homes.
     

    Robin Hood

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    #5
    Guillable Shias trying to please Christians, again...

    Don't they know that Christians believe that Islam = ISIS?
     

    lebnan_lilkel

    Well-Known Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    #7
    This is laughable. The Christians haven't entered the fight with ISIS. They are late and reluctant just like 1974-5. But when they enter, it will have a different flavor. It will be vicious, just like they resisted the Syrians Shiites Sinnis Druz Palestinians Libyans Soumalis etc.. in the age before twitter.

    HA know that and want them to join but the foundations haven't been laid by changing ones divisional beliefs and fighting under the cause that is Lebanon and freedom for all. SHN has the Charisma to lead a powerful nation but has to navigate the religious hurdles to assemble a truly Lebanese fighting force. Christians and Muslims are by birth, patriotism is the only measuring stick. On the other hand Christians are lazy and opportunistic. However, if they are stung, god forbid, they will easily turn into a brave and loyal fighting force with the cooperation of HA. The arming of people around Ras Baalbeck has started a pro HA christian community and I hear a lot of positive things even from the LFers. Who knows, ISIS + SH may achieve something Moussa elSadr , Camille Chamoun ,Sleiman Franjieh and Bashir couldn't.
     

    SeaAb

    Well-Known Member
    Staff member
    Super Penguin
    #9
    Nice gesture :) Let's hope Iraqi Christians can go back to their homes one day. I think they can leave peacefully with their Shiite and Kurd neighbors (others I don't know). May God end this crazy war.
    The whole point is for them NOT to leave :D Funny how one typo changes the whole message..or maybe it was your subconscious taking over? :p

    On a more serious note, it's beautiful to see a message of tolerance and willingness to coexist amidst this sea of blood and ignorant umma that was unleashed on us.
     

    Impera

    Active Member
    #10
    RIP the Assyrians. From a mighty empire to a tool to fight a group of fanatics.

    In any case, anybody who thinks that any sect will spend one penny on another sect for humanitarian and not political purposes is a naive fool.

    And btw, this "nasheed" is ugly af.
     

    kmarthe

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    #13
    The whole point is for them NOT to leave :D Funny how one typo changes the whole message..or maybe it was your subconscious taking over? :p

    On a more serious note, it's beautiful to see a message of tolerance and willingness to coexist amidst this sea of blood and ignorant umma that was unleashed on us.
    LOL! It was a typo :D I meant "live" and not "leave" of course! Apologies!
     

    Dalzi

    Legendary Member
    #17
    I like the idea of Christian Members of, wait for it, wait for it, wait for it :), members of Kata2eb imam 3ali :)

    3emlolon nashid kamen :)
    They're cute. One has to take a side Jo, with Satan or against. All the against are the same regardless of religion. It's the 'side' that matters :)
     
    #18
    D
    Doesn't Isis represent at least 80 % of Muslims ???
    Denial again and excuses again
    This is crap. If ISIS was 80% of muslims then we'd all be dead long ago. ISIS is nothing by itself. It is only a mechanism, a tool which anybody can use at will for personal goals.

    Yes, ISIS in Iraq lives on the support of the sunni community that feels oppressed or sidelined after deaces of rule, but Iraqi sunnis are using this tool to regain lost power. It's a specific case.

    ISIS in Syria is only feasible bcz of foreign recruits. The vast majorty of syrian sunnis have nothing to do with it. In Egypt, Tunis, Argelia, Morocco, Jordan or Turkey, ISIS supporters are so few, mostly marginalised and violent individuals, many already with issues with local authorities. Even amongst European muslims, which number maybe 15 million or so, ISIS supporters, even those radicalised make up less than 1%.

    It's all the propaganda by the media that is blowing things out of proportion.

    A different issue has to do with the silence of the sunni street against all sorts of brutalities commmited by those who claim to represent them. I believe that it is sunnis who must lead an open war against religious radicalism within their own sect and on all fronts. But don't expect Iraqi or Yemeni sunnis to do it. They are more worried about fighting crazy sectarian wars that benefit noone.
     

    HannaTheCrusader

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    #19
    This is crap. If ISIS was 80% of muslims then we'd all be dead long ago. ISIS is nothing by itself. It is only a mechanism, a tool which anybody can use at will for personal goals.

    Yes, ISIS in Iraq lives on the support of the sunni community that feels oppressed or sidelined after deaces of rule, but Iraqi sunnis are using this tool to regain lost power. It's a specific case.

    ISIS in Syria is only feasible bcz of foreign recruits. The vast majorty of syrian sunnis have nothing to do with it. In Egypt, Tunis, Argelia, Morocco, Jordan or Turkey, ISIS supporters are so few, mostly marginalised and violent individuals, many already with issues with local authorities. Even amongst European muslims, which number maybe 15 million or so, ISIS supporters, even those radicalised make up less than 1%.

    It's all the propaganda by the media that is blowing things out of proportion.

    A different issue has to do with the silence of the sunni street against all sorts of brutalities commmited by those who claim to represent them. I believe that it is sunnis who must lead an open war against religious radicalism within their own sect and on all fronts. But don't expect Iraqi or Yemeni sunnis to do it. They are more worried about fighting crazy sectarian wars that benefit noone.

    silence is an indirect acceptance

    from all people, i am surprised you are making excuses for the majority of sunnis when it comes to daesh, nousra, salafis,
     
    #20
    silence is an indirect acceptance

    from all people, i am surprised you are making excuses for the majority of sunnis when it comes to daesh, nousra, salafis,
    I'm not making excuses. I do think that sunnis have a serious problem with their faith and that they are not making the necessary efforts to put an end to this madness, which is mostly caused by them...let's not forget sunni sectarian violence hitting countries from Morocco to Pakistan since decades ago. I blame them for not finding a consensus on what is allowed in islam and what should be globally and totally banned now and for ages to come. In fact, they often seem to not give a shit about the state of despair, moral bankruptcy and decadence that sunni islam is living today.

    But the fact remains that we can't put all sunnis in the same basket. Again there are 15 million muslims in Europe, many poor and marginalised. Still only 3 thousand or so are thought to have left for Syria. It is like 0,02%. If we consider that 1 out of every 100 european muslims that support ISIS has travelled to Syria to join them, then we get that the overall core support base for radical Islam could easily be around 1,5-2% of all european muslims. I'm guessing. This 1% is very violent and has abused the name of sunnis, partly due to their silence, again.
     
    Top