Conclusion of the Mueller investigation soon

The Mueller Investigation will

  • End soon

    Votes: 3 33.3%
  • Accused the President of collusion with Russia

    Votes: 3 33.3%
  • Prove nothing against the President

    Votes: 3 33.3%
  • Is a terrible waste of money

    Votes: 5 55.6%
  • Is politically motivated

    Votes: 3 33.3%
  • Is motivated by concern over Russian role in Trump Victory

    Votes: 5 55.6%

  • Total voters
    9
proIsrael-nonIsraeli

proIsrael-nonIsraeli

Legendary Member
So Mueller ended up creating more confusion with his "statement".

Granted Tramp and his gang are dirty and refusing to publish the whole report or testify in front of Congress is an assault on democracy.. but still Dems need to pick their battles. This just doesn't look like a winning one and the quicker they drop it the better.
"Granted Tramp and his gang are dirty and refusing to publish the whole report ... is an assault on democracy"
---
The parts of report that are NOT available to the public (approx 4% of the report) are the parts that are prohibited to be exposed by law.
However, entire report, without reduction and omissions, is available to all members of The Congress to be viewed in closed, secure setting.
I bet this part was not delivered to you by your "trusty" News Media sources.

"Granted Tramp and his gang are dirty and refusing to ... testify in front of Congress is an assault on democracy"
---
Refusal of testify is part of our Rights and also part of executing of Executive Privilege, Obama has done it as well.
I bet this part was not delivered to you by your "trusty" News Media sources either.
 
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  • CrusaderV

    CrusaderV

    Well-Known Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Mueller to testify publicly on July 17

    BY MORGAN CHALFANT AND TAL AXELROD 638
    TWEET SHARE MORE


    Special counsel Robert Mueller will publicly testify in front of the House Judiciary and Intelligence Committees on July 17 following a subpoena, the panels’ chairmen said Tuesday.

    “Pursuant to subpoenas issued by the House Judiciary and House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence tonight, Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller III has agreed to testify before both Committees on July 17 in open session,” Rep. Jerrold Nadler (D-N.Y.), the chair of the Judiciary panel, and Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Calif.), the chair of the Intelligence panel, said in a joint statement issued late Tuesday.

    “Americans have demanded to hear directly from the Special Counsel so they can understand what he and his team examined, uncovered, and determined about Russia’s attack on our democracy, the Trump campaign’s acceptance and use of that help, and President Trump and his associates' obstruction of the investigation into that attack," Nadler and Schiff said.

    Both panels had been negotiating for Mueller’s voluntary appearance for several weeks but hadn’t reached an agreement; Mueller signaled his unwillingness to testify publicly before Congress in his first public remarks on his investigation into Russian election interference last month.

    Mueller also said last month that any public testimony he gives would not go beyond the four corners of his 448-page report.

    Nadler and Schiff issued separate subpoenas for Mueller’s public appearances on Tuesday, writing in a letter to the now-ex special counsel: “We have consistently communicated our Committee’s intention to issue these subpoenas, if necessary, and we now understand it necessary to do so.”

    Nadler and Schiff acknowledged “certain sensitivities" stemming from Mueller’s testimony, noting that the special counsel’s office referred multiple criminal investigations to other districts, some of which are still being investigated.

    “We will work with you to address legitimate concerns about preserving the integrity of your work, but we expect that you will appear before our Committees as scheduled,” they wrote.

    Mueller’s appearance before Congress on July 17 is certain to be a spectacle of historic proportions.

    It will mark his first public appearance related to the Russia investigation since delivering his 10-minute statement on May 29 during which he outlined his conclusions and explained his decision not to reach a conclusion on whether President Trump obstructed justice. Mueller stepped off the Justice Department podium after the brief statement, declining to take questions from reporters and making clear he hoped the remarks would be his last on the investigation.

    Next month, Democratic and Republican lawmakers will have the opportunity to question Mueller publicly on his findings for several hours, setting the stage for a momentous day of testimony on Capitol Hill.

    Mueller, who remained intensely quiet throughout his two-year investigation despite constant attacks from Trump, detailed an elaborate plot by Russia to interfere in the election in his exhaustive report.

    Mueller also laid out dozens of contacts between the Trump campaign and Kremlin-linked figures, however he said the investigation found insufficient to charge members or associates of the campaign with conspiring with Russia to interfere in the election.

    Many Democrats are eager to question Mueller publicly about the various episodes he examined as potentially obstructive efforts by Trump, however it remains unlikely Mueller will say much more than what is laid out in his report.
     
    proIsrael-nonIsraeli

    proIsrael-nonIsraeli

    Legendary Member
    Mueller to testify publicly on July 17

    BY MORGAN CHALFANT AND TAL AXELROD 638
    TWEET SHARE MORE


    Special counsel Robert Mueller will publicly testify in front of the House Judiciary and Intelligence Committees on July 17 following a subpoena, the panels’ chairmen said Tuesday.

    “Pursuant to subpoenas issued by the House Judiciary and House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence tonight, Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller III has agreed to testify before both Committees on July 17 in open session,” Rep. Jerrold Nadler (D-N.Y.), the chair of the Judiciary panel, and Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Calif.), the chair of the Intelligence panel, said in a joint statement issued late Tuesday.

    “Americans have demanded to hear directly from the Special Counsel so they can understand what he and his team examined, uncovered, and determined about Russia’s attack on our democracy, the Trump campaign’s acceptance and use of that help, and President Trump and his associates' obstruction of the investigation into that attack," Nadler and Schiff said.

    Both panels had been negotiating for Mueller’s voluntary appearance for several weeks but hadn’t reached an agreement; Mueller signaled his unwillingness to testify publicly before Congress in his first public remarks on his investigation into Russian election interference last month.

    Mueller also said last month that any public testimony he gives would not go beyond the four corners of his 448-page report.

    Nadler and Schiff issued separate subpoenas for Mueller’s public appearances on Tuesday, writing in a letter to the now-ex special counsel: “We have consistently communicated our Committee’s intention to issue these subpoenas, if necessary, and we now understand it necessary to do so.”

    Nadler and Schiff acknowledged “certain sensitivities" stemming from Mueller’s testimony, noting that the special counsel’s office referred multiple criminal investigations to other districts, some of which are still being investigated.

    “We will work with you to address legitimate concerns about preserving the integrity of your work, but we expect that you will appear before our Committees as scheduled,” they wrote.

    Mueller’s appearance before Congress on July 17 is certain to be a spectacle of historic proportions.

    It will mark his first public appearance related to the Russia investigation since delivering his 10-minute statement on May 29 during which he outlined his conclusions and explained his decision not to reach a conclusion on whether President Trump obstructed justice. Mueller stepped off the Justice Department podium after the brief statement, declining to take questions from reporters and making clear he hoped the remarks would be his last on the investigation.

    Next month, Democratic and Republican lawmakers will have the opportunity to question Mueller publicly on his findings for several hours, setting the stage for a momentous day of testimony on Capitol Hill.

    Mueller, who remained intensely quiet throughout his two-year investigation despite constant attacks from Trump, detailed an elaborate plot by Russia to interfere in the election in his exhaustive report.

    Mueller also laid out dozens of contacts between the Trump campaign and Kremlin-linked figures, however he said the investigation found insufficient to charge members or associates of the campaign with conspiring with Russia to interfere in the election.

    Many Democrats are eager to question Mueller publicly about the various episodes he examined as potentially obstructive efforts by Trump, however it remains unlikely Mueller will say much more than what is laid out in his report.
    If I were in Nadler 's place I would''ve done everything possible to avoid having Mueller testify - it has very high probability for testimony not to go the way that Nadler hopes it would go.
     
    CrusaderV

    CrusaderV

    Well-Known Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    If I were in Nadler 's place I would''ve done everything possible to avoid having Mueller testify - it has very high probability for testimony not to go the way that Nadler hopes it would go.
    Hopefully this charade is ne soon
     
    HannaTheCrusader

    HannaTheCrusader

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Mueller to testify publicly on July 17

    BY MORGAN CHALFANT AND TAL AXELROD 638
    TWEET SHARE MORE


    Special counsel Robert Mueller will publicly testify in front of the House Judiciary and Intelligence Committees on July 17 following a subpoena, the panels’ chairmen said Tuesday.

    “Pursuant to subpoenas issued by the House Judiciary and House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence tonight, Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller III has agreed to testify before both Committees on July 17 in open session,” Rep. Jerrold Nadler (D-N.Y.), the chair of the Judiciary panel, and Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Calif.), the chair of the Intelligence panel, said in a joint statement issued late Tuesday.

    “Americans have demanded to hear directly from the Special Counsel so they can understand what he and his team examined, uncovered, and determined about Russia’s attack on our democracy, the Trump campaign’s acceptance and use of that help, and President Trump and his associates' obstruction of the investigation into that attack," Nadler and Schiff said.

    Both panels had been negotiating for Mueller’s voluntary appearance for several weeks but hadn’t reached an agreement; Mueller signaled his unwillingness to testify publicly before Congress in his first public remarks on his investigation into Russian election interference last month.

    Mueller also said last month that any public testimony he gives would not go beyond the four corners of his 448-page report.

    Nadler and Schiff issued separate subpoenas for Mueller’s public appearances on Tuesday, writing in a letter to the now-ex special counsel: “We have consistently communicated our Committee’s intention to issue these subpoenas, if necessary, and we now understand it necessary to do so.”

    Nadler and Schiff acknowledged “certain sensitivities" stemming from Mueller’s testimony, noting that the special counsel’s office referred multiple criminal investigations to other districts, some of which are still being investigated.

    “We will work with you to address legitimate concerns about preserving the integrity of your work, but we expect that you will appear before our Committees as scheduled,” they wrote.

    Mueller’s appearance before Congress on July 17 is certain to be a spectacle of historic proportions.

    It will mark his first public appearance related to the Russia investigation since delivering his 10-minute statement on May 29 during which he outlined his conclusions and explained his decision not to reach a conclusion on whether President Trump obstructed justice. Mueller stepped off the Justice Department podium after the brief statement, declining to take questions from reporters and making clear he hoped the remarks would be his last on the investigation.

    Next month, Democratic and Republican lawmakers will have the opportunity to question Mueller publicly on his findings for several hours, setting the stage for a momentous day of testimony on Capitol Hill.

    Mueller, who remained intensely quiet throughout his two-year investigation despite constant attacks from Trump, detailed an elaborate plot by Russia to interfere in the election in his exhaustive report.

    Mueller also laid out dozens of contacts between the Trump campaign and Kremlin-linked figures, however he said the investigation found insufficient to charge members or associates of the campaign with conspiring with Russia to interfere in the election.

    Many Democrats are eager to question Mueller publicly about the various episodes he examined as potentially obstructive efforts by Trump, however it remains unlikely Mueller will say much more than what is laid out in his report.

    let them impeach trump
    let them impeach trump

    and guarantee his 2nd term
     
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