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Deep into Druze faith

#1
Thread dedicated to the Druze faith or religion. Honestly I was kinda shocked there was still no thread on them considering their fundamental role in the formation of Lebanon. Fakhreddine was the first to come up with the concept of a united Lebanon back in the 16th century.

Apparently there are many misconceptions about the Druze and their faith, especially among Christians. I was talking to a Druze guy some time ago and he said Druze faith is much closer to Christianity than to Islam and they actually take offense when someone calls them Muslims, but that due to persecution they had to historically 'portray' themselves as Muslims, that's why a Quran used to be displayed at the entrance of their homes, a practice that is no longer common. However, very few people have access to their actual scriptures, which just the Sheiks and 'initiated' people have access to. He told me that even most Druzes are considered 'ignorant' to have access to those books. If there's any Druze member, your input would be appreciated.
 
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  • manifesto

    Well-Known Member
    #2
    Thread dedicated to the Druze faith or religion. Honestly I was kinda shocked there was still no thread on them considering their fundamental role in the formation of Lebanon. Fakhreddine was the first to come up with the concept of a united Lebanon back in the 16th century.

    Apparently there are many misconceptions about the Druze and their faith, especially among Christians. I was talking to a Druze guy some time ago and he said Druze faith is much closer to Christianity than to Islam and they actually take offense when someone calls them Muslims, but that due to persecution they had to historically 'portray' themselves as Muslims, that's why a Quran used to be displayed at the entrance of their homes, a practice that is no longer common. However, very few people have access to their actual scriptures, which just the Sheiks and 'initiated' people have access to. He told me that even most Druzes are considered 'ignorant' to have access to those books. If there's any Druze member, your input would be appreciated.
    So how are we supposed to judge the Druze faith, if we can't have access to their scripture?

    It's basically an off-shoot of Shi'ism, and thus has more in common with Islam and Hinduism than Christianity.

    The Druze are for the most part peaceful, considering they don't follow the Quran and Sharia law. However they are still some of the most tribal and close-minded people in Lebanon. The majority would disown their children if they married someone from a different faith.
     

    Isabella

    The Queen Of "Bazella"
    Orange Room Supporter
    #3
    I don't know much about druze, it's hard to really get to know esoteric religions that are designed to be understood by very few people.

    What I do know is the following:

    They believe that religious teachings given by prophets and holy men are given in the form of allegories and their true meaning is reserved for those with intellect. Meaning there is the part that everyone who can read and write understands then there is the more meaningful message reserved for those who are willing to delve deeper into scripture and do some "decoding", then you have a hidden message reserved only for the truly enlightened individuals, the crème of the crop!

    Their canon includes that of all abrahamic religions before them: meaning old testament, new testament and the Qur'an and some philosophical work from Greek philosophers as well as inspirations from India (which is probably where their belief in reincarnation comes from) and some hidden scripture reserved only to a select few individuals...

    Their belief in reincarnation is different from Hindus and Buddhists in that a human soul can only inhabit a human body, not any living being because it's impossible for the soul to exist without the body

    Also this might be more of a stereotype kinda like what people say about Armenians and jews, but I believe it's actually a tenant when it comes to druze... "Bi leffo 3a ba3dun" so to speak lol


    As to how close they are to Islam and Christianity I honestly have no idea!
     
    #4
    I know lot of druze, and they are not close to christians in any way. far from it.

    The Druze are for the most part peaceful, considering they don't follow the Quran and Sharia law. However they are still some of the most tribal and close-minded people in Lebanon. The majority would disown their children if they married someone from a different faith.
    The druze politics in lebanese history has always been negative in particular with christians.Starting with Kamal Junblatt supporting palestinians to his clown son Walid.
     
    #5
    I know lot of druze, and they are not close to christians in any way. far from it.



    The druze politics in lebanese history has always been negative in particular with christians.Starting with Kamal Junblatt supporting palestinians to his clown son Walid.
    Druze were the majority of the population in Mount Lebanon until the battle of Ain Dara, when the defeated clans massively migrated to Sweida and to a lesser extent Galilee. The victorious clans which included the Jumblats allowed Christians to resettle those depopulated areas. Up to then, Maronites were mostly tightly concentrated around Kadisha Valley/Zagharta.
     

    manifesto

    Well-Known Member
    #6
    The druze politics in lebanese history has always been negative in particular with christians.Starting with Kamal Junblatt supporting palestinians to his clown son Walid.
    True. However, their politics have always been driven by tribal instincts rather than religious zeal.

    Contrary to Muslims, there are no individuals today committing acts of terrorism out of Druze-driven motivations.
    Their faith seems to be free of the radicalism that is infecting Islamic countries.

    The Druze couldn't care less about enforcing their beliefs on others or converting people to their religion. (Which is theoretically impossible, if I'm not mistaken).
     
    #7
    So how are we supposed to judge the Druze faith, if we can't have access to their scripture?

    It's basically an off-shoot of Shi'ism, and thus has more in common with Islam and Hinduism than Christianity.

    The Druze are for the most part peaceful, considering they don't follow the Quran and Sharia law. However they are still some of the most tribal and close-minded people in Lebanon. The majority would disown their children if they married someone from a different faith.
    From our personal experiences with them and what is already known.

    I don't agree with stance that they are an off-shoot of Shiism. The founders may have been Shia Ismails, but it's a completely different religion. It's known they started as unitarians trying to unite Sunnis, Shia's and Christians and it failed to spread in Egypt but it quickly spread throughout Mount Lebanon. I also suspect the original converts in Mount Lebanon may have been Christians. There's even several genetic studies that say Druzes are genetically very close to Christians since they lack Arabian input, unlike most Muslims. So there's that also.
     

    manifesto

    Well-Known Member
    #8
    From our personal experiences with them and what is already known.

    I don't agree with stance that they are an off-shoot of Shiism. The founders may have been Shia Ismails, but it's a completely different religion. It's known they started as unitarians trying to unite Sunnis, Shia's and Christians and it failed to spread in Egypt but it quickly spread throughout Mount Lebanon. I also suspect the original converts in Mount Lebanon may have been Christians. There's even several genetic studies that say Druzes are genetically very close to Christians since they lack Arabian input, unlike most Muslims. So there's that also.
    Ironically, they've always been the most ardent defenders of Pan-Arabism in Lebanon.

    Also, they dress like Salafists.


    Whoever invented their headscarf needs to be shot. It's very unflattering, as it makes the nose look bigger.

    I can see how this can work for fasting though. Very effective.
     
    #9
    Ironically, the Druze in Israel have been some of the most ardent defenders of that country. Especially for a minority group that speaks Arabic.

    The Druze in Lebanon have been blinded by their hatred of the Christians going back to 1840 and 1860. They don’t realize that the Christians are their natural allies against Islamism.
     
    #10
    Ironically, they've always been the most ardent defenders of Pan-Arabism in Lebanon.

    Also, they dress like Salafists.
    View attachment 10882

    Whoever invented their headscarf needs to be shot. It's very unflattering, as it makes the nose look bigger.

    I can see how this can work for fasting though. Very effective.

    I think not even 10% of the women wear that headscarf, and the ones I've seen wear it in a much loose way.
     
    #11
    Ironically, the Druze in Israel have been some of the most ardent defenders of that country. Especially for a minority group that speaks Arabic.

    The Druze in Lebanon have been blinded by their hatred of the Christians going back to 1840 and 1860. They don’t realize that the Christians are their natural allies against Islamism.

    The Druze in Israel don't even consider themselves to be Arabs, they consider Druze as their ethnicity weirdly enough, and they're even giving their children Hebrew names.

    Most Druze realize that now, it's the Christians who are not willing to have them as allies and keep on hating on them.
     

    Isabella

    The Queen Of "Bazella"
    Orange Room Supporter
    #13
    Ironically, they've always been the most ardent defenders of Pan-Arabism in Lebanon.

    Also, they dress like Salafists.
    View attachment 10882

    Whoever invented their headscarf needs to be shot. It's very unflattering, as it makes the nose look bigger.

    I can see how this can work for fasting though. Very effective.
    Lmao but I don't think druze actually fast, they believe that they are connected to god at all times and rituals like fasting and praying for forgiveness are likely to make you repeat your sins instead of working on bettering yourself

    I may be totally off as well!! My knowledge about druze comes from an old book in my dad's library I've read ages ago because I had nothing else to read lol
     

    manifesto

    Well-Known Member
    #14
    The Druze in Israel don't even consider themselves to be Arabs, they consider Druze as their ethnicity weirdly enough, and they're even giving their children Hebrew names.
    Considering the lack of intermarriage with people from other sects, I think they do qualify as an ethnicity now.
    They are quite homogeneous as a people.
    I can easily tell if someone is a Druze by the way they look.

    Lmao but I don't think druze actually fast, they believe that they are connected to god at all times and rituals like fasting and praying for forgiveness are likely to make you repeat your sins instead of working on bettering yourself
    They do not observe Ramadan, but they do fast during the 10 days before Eid-el-Adha.
    The majority of Druze I know are very irreligious, though.
     

    SeaAb

    Well-Known Member
    Staff member
    Super Penguin
    #15
    I never understood how Druze are considered Muslims. I never saw a Druze travel to Mecca to perform the Hajj pilgrimage, which is one of the five pillars of Islam.
     

    manifesto

    Well-Known Member
    #16
    I never understood how Druze are considered Muslims. I never saw a Druze travel to Mecca to perform the Hajj pilgrimage, which is one of the five pillars of Islam.
    The Al-Azhar Shia Fatwa, known in Arabic as The Shaltoot Fatwa (Arabic: فتوى شلتوت‎), is an Islamic fatwa issued in 1959 on the topic of Shi'a–Sunni relations by Sunni scholar Shaikh Mahmood Shaltoot. Under Shaltoot, Sunni-Shia ecumenical activities would reach their zenith.

    This rare fatwa, which admits Shia Muslims, Alawites, and Druze, who had been considered heretics and idolaters for hundreds of years, into mainstream Islam has been viewed as being inspired by Egyptian president Gamal Abdel Nasser. Nasser saw it as a tool to spread his appeal and influence across the entire Arab world.

    Al-Azhar Shia Fatwa - Wikipedia
     

    Isabella

    The Queen Of "Bazella"
    Orange Room Supporter
    #17
    Considering the lack of intermarriage with people from other sects, I think they do qualify as an ethnicity now.
    They are quite homogeneous as a people.
    I can easily tell if someone is a Druze by the way they look.



    They do not observe Ramadan, but they do fast during the 10 days before Eid-el-Adha.
    The majority of Druze I know are very irreligious, though.
    yeah I just googled it, I was mistaken
     
    #18
    Considering the lack of intermarriage with people from other sects, I think they do qualify as an ethnicity now.
    They are quite homogeneous as a people.
    I can easily tell if someone is a Druze by the way they look.



    They do not observe Ramadan, but they do fast during the 10 days before Eid-el-Adha.
    The majority of Druze I know are very irreligious, though.

    Me too. It's also quite easy to tell if someone is Shia interestingly enough. Both of them tend to have a higher prevalence of light eyes and and pigmentation from my experience. However people who look like Ramy Ayach for instance can only be Druze.
     
    #19
    Another interesting fact is that nowadays it's very rare to find Druze with Muslim names like Mohammed, Fatima, Ali etc, except for old people. Most tend to have 'neutral' names or even Christian and Western names. I know one Druze girl called Christina for instance, Daniel seems very common also. Druze somewhat 'embraced' Arabism as a mean of self defence from much more dangerous Islamism, similar like the Greek Orthodox for example. But now they tend to be just as pro West as Maronites, which is not surprising since they had historical contact with the Italians and British. I'm not not gonna lie, one of the reasons I opened the thread is for Christians to notice how wonderful people they are and stop hating them, how incredible allies they could make.
     
    #20
    I was talking to a Druze guy some time ago and he said Druze faith is much closer to Christianity than to Islam and they actually take offense when someone calls them Muslims, but that due to persecution they had to historically 'portray' themselves as Muslims
    Not much information to share about this very secretive faith. But it is certainly nowhere close to christianity, which is a universal religion.
    One defining characteristic of the Druze faith is that it is hereditary. You cannot become Druze by your beliefs, you have to be born a Druze to be a Druze. Some consider them crypto-jews because of this. They may be right about that.
    The one I know call themselves muslims, but don't seem offended when I say 'well, not quite'
     
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