Do the protesters realize they're putting people out of business?

AtheistForJesus

AtheistForJesus

Well-Known Member
One might argue that the economy had already been deteriorating, but we cannot simply ignore the impact of the 2-month protests on the economy.
According to Riad Breich, a front desk manager at Cavalier Hotel in Hamra, the protests prompted a lot of tourists to cancel their reservations during this festive season.
Occupancy at his hotel now stands at 30 percent only compared to last year's 100 percent reservation rate.
Most of the hotels shut down some of their floors to reduce expenses, while others decided to cut employees' wages.

Even at times of war, Lebanon hasn't experienced anything like this.
Don't you think it's time the protesters took a break? Not for the sake of our corrupt politicians, but for those whose survival depends on the stability of the country.


Lebanese hotels suffer heavy losses during Christmas amid nationwide protests - Xinhua | English.news.cn"


What are your thoughts? Do you think the protests accelerated the economic downfall?
Or do you think the current crisis was bound to happen regardless?
 
  • Advertisement
  • LVV

    LVV

    Well-Known Member
    I think the Protesters killed the economy true
    But the economy was already collapsing
    Better to begin from scratch with non corrupted people
     
    ّTelefon Kasse

    ّTelefon Kasse

    Member
    The Banks and Mustaqbal + Ishtiraqi + Berri are putting Lebanon out of business !!
    Businesses are closing before 17 october, precisely since 3 years ago ... it is unacceptable
    that the old political league stay in power !! we want true reforms that allow us to regain our country
    not to stay chained with debts and pay for it by blood !! ... the political parties in Lebanon should
    understand that it is unacceptable to keep fighting wars in countries that are bigger than us
    or that naturalizing thousands of Palestinian an Syrian refugees that will only increase our
    economic problems and possibly will lead to destructive civil wars in the future
     
    AtheistForJesus

    AtheistForJesus

    Well-Known Member
    I think the Protesters killed the economy true
    But the economy was already collapsing
    Better to begin from scratch with non corrupted people

    The first nine months of 2019 were good for tourism in Lebanon.
    It's the protests that killed the tourism industry.

    "On November 25, the SRCNP released another statement saying that out of 12,000 F&B outlets in Lebanon, 265 had closed down over the past two months (October and most of November), a figure which online restaurant directory and delivery app Zomato collaborated. In an interview with Executive, Tony Ramy, president of the syndicate, warned that if the situation continues like this, there could be as many as 400 outlets closed in a three month period (from start October to year’s end).

     
    Notorious

    Notorious

    First of his Name
    Orange Room Supporter
    One might argue that the economy had already been deteriorating, but we cannot simply ignore the impact of the 2-month protests on the economy.
    According to Riad Breich, a front desk manager at Cavalier Hotel in Hamra, the protests prompted a lot of tourists to cancel their reservations during this festive season.
    Occupancy at his hotel now stands at 30 percent only compared to last year's 100 percent reservation rate.
    Most of the hotels shut down some of their floors to reduce expenses, while others decided to cut employees' wages.

    Even at times of war, Lebanon hasn't experienced anything like this.
    Don't you think it's time the protesters took a break? Not for the sake of our corrupt politicians, but for those whose survival depends on the stability of the country.


    Lebanese hotels suffer heavy losses during Christmas amid nationwide protests - Xinhua | English.news.cn"


    What are your thoughts? Do you think the protests accelerated the economic downfall?
    Or do you think the current crisis was bound to happen regardless?
    It’s debatable. Basically, there was a downward trend. It reached an inflection point where it forced people to shut the country down. That’s merely a symptom of the underlying problem that started years ago and grew exponentially. It’s impossible to tell protestors to go home because many people have nothing to lose anymore and have reached a point of no return. If you started this you have to finish it.

    The best analogy is cancer. When a patient has cancer, chemotherapy is used to kill off the cancerous cells. They unfortunately also target healthy ones also and often bring the organism to a very weak, sometimes near death state. It is a necessary evil to get rid of the real problem.
     
    !Aoune32

    !Aoune32

    Well-Known Member
    One might argue that the economy had already been deteriorating, but we cannot simply ignore the impact of the 2-month protests on the economy.
    According to Riad Breich, a front desk manager at Cavalier Hotel in Hamra, the protests prompted a lot of tourists to cancel their reservations during this festive season.
    Occupancy at his hotel now stands at 30 percent only compared to last year's 100 percent reservation rate.
    Most of the hotels shut down some of their floors to reduce expenses, while others decided to cut employees' wages.

    Even at times of war, Lebanon hasn't experienced anything like this.
    Don't you think it's time the protesters took a break? Not for the sake of our corrupt politicians, but for those whose survival depends on the stability of the country.


    Lebanese hotels suffer heavy losses during Christmas amid nationwide protests - Xinhua | English.news.cn"


    What are your thoughts? Do you think the protests accelerated the economic downfall?
    Or do you think the current crisis was bound to happen regardless?
    Do people realise that since the 90s our debt has been increasing?
    Do people realise that they vote for the same garbage?
    Do people realise that they rather immigrate then actually change the person they vote for?
    Do people realise that there is no health care, no running water, no 24 electricity, the basic needs are not there?
    Do people realise it is their FAULT?
     
    !Aoune32

    !Aoune32

    Well-Known Member
    After decades of hard work, self-made Lebanese chocolatier Roger Zakhour thought he would finally be able to pass a successful business to his daughter. But then the economic crisis hit.

    Instead of reaping profits this Christmas, he and his 29-year-old daughter are marking down their handmade ice cream logs.

    "If it continues like this, in a few months I'll be bankrupt," the 61-year-old said sitting in his small shop, surrounded by colourful stacks of hand-crafted chocolates.

    In protest-hit Lebanon, a free-falling economy, price hikes and a severe dollar liquidity crunch have left local businesses struggling to stave off collapse.

    Zakhour started making chocolates and then ice cream in the 1990s, refining his recipes until he became a go-to for five-star hotels and well-off Lebanese.

    But as the economy worsened over the autumn, high-end hotels drastically reduced their orders and walk-in customers became rare.

    Banks have restricted access to dollars since the end of the summer, sending prices soaring as importers struggle to secure enough hard currency to buy supplies.

    "We're heading somewhere we never imagined we would," said Zakhour, who had just upgraded his kitchen when sales dropped off.

    - Support fellow citizens -

    In pursuit of high-quality products, Zakhour imports his ingredients, paying in euros or dollars.

    But with withdrawals restricted and no transfers abroad, that is no longer viable.

    "Now when something runs out, that's it," he said.

    Unprecedented protests have swept Lebanon since October 17, with people from all backgrounds demanding a complete overhaul of a political class they deem useless and corrupt.

    The government stepped down on October 29, but endless political deadlock has delayed a new one being formed to tackle the urgent need for economic reforms.

    Zakhour's business is just one of thousands struggling to stay afloat.

    Many Lebanese have been forced to close shop, and a large number have been fired or seen their salaries slashed by half, even as the cost of living increases.

    Watching all this unfold, 31-year-old nursery school teacher Lea Hedary Kreidi and her family racked their brains to see how they could help.

    Shortly after protests started, they launched a group on Facebook called "Made in Lebanon -- The Lebanese Products Group" to encourage Lebanese to buy locally produced goods.

    In just two months, they amassed more than 32,000 members, who post ads for locally or homemade goods, or ask for local alternatives to imported products.

    - 'Made in Lebanon' -

    "We're used to going shopping and buying what our mothers used to buy. We grab what's in front of us without checking if it's made in Lebanon or not," she said, seated at home by a sparkling Christmas tree.

    But there are locally made options for numerous products, including detergent, shampoo, nappies, peanut butter, ketchup, and children's building blocks.

    "I was surprised by how many things there were that I didn't know about," said the mother of a baby boy.

    In her drive to support her fellow citizens, Kreidi now skips her usual supermarket in favour of nearby small grocers.

    This Christmas, only the children in her family will be receiving presents, which will all be made in Lebanon.

    In Beirut, bar manager Rani al-Rajji says he is also having to adapt -- moving away from increasingly expensive imports while also remaining affordable.

    "As much as I can, I'm trying to lessen the blow so our guests don't feel they've lost their purchasing power and can no longer afford to go out," said the 43-year-old, who is also an architect.

    To do this, he and his co-founders are trying to increase local brands from a fifth to around a half of all bar and kitchen supplies.

    "We're trying to use local products for all those with an alternative made in Lebanon," he said, sitting at the bar.

    And they are also attempting to cut out unnecessary packaging and marketing costs, serving wine directly from the barrel and beer from the keg.

    "We can't replace everything, but we can try to give Lebanese products more life, encourage their consumption," he said.

    But some cash-strapped consumers say buying local is not their chief concern.

    In a Beirut supermarket, 35-year-old Mariam Rabbah clutched a nearly empty basket wondering what to buy with her diminished salary.

    "Everything is more expensive and we're now paid half," she said.

    "Now what we care about is if something is cheap and good quality -- not whether it's imported or Lebanese."
     
    AtheistForJesus

    AtheistForJesus

    Well-Known Member
    After decades of hard work, self-made Lebanese chocolatier Roger Zakhour thought he would finally be able to pass a successful business to his daughter. But then the economic crisis hit.

    Instead of reaping profits this Christmas, he and his 29-year-old daughter are marking down their handmade ice cream logs.

    "If it continues like this, in a few months I'll be bankrupt," the 61-year-old said sitting in his small shop, surrounded by colourful stacks of hand-crafted chocolates.

    In protest-hit Lebanon, a free-falling economy, price hikes and a severe dollar liquidity crunch have left local businesses struggling to stave off collapse.

    Zakhour started making chocolates and then ice cream in the 1990s, refining his recipes until he became a go-to for five-star hotels and well-off Lebanese.

    But as the economy worsened over the autumn, high-end hotels drastically reduced their orders and walk-in customers became rare.

    Banks have restricted access to dollars since the end of the summer, sending prices soaring as importers struggle to secure enough hard currency to buy supplies.

    "We're heading somewhere we never imagined we would," said Zakhour, who had just upgraded his kitchen when sales dropped off.

    - Support fellow citizens -

    In pursuit of high-quality products, Zakhour imports his ingredients, paying in euros or dollars.

    But with withdrawals restricted and no transfers abroad, that is no longer viable.

    "Now when something runs out, that's it," he said.

    Unprecedented protests have swept Lebanon since October 17, with people from all backgrounds demanding a complete overhaul of a political class they deem useless and corrupt.

    The government stepped down on October 29, but endless political deadlock has delayed a new one being formed to tackle the urgent need for economic reforms.

    Zakhour's business is just one of thousands struggling to stay afloat.

    Many Lebanese have been forced to close shop, and a large number have been fired or seen their salaries slashed by half, even as the cost of living increases.

    Watching all this unfold, 31-year-old nursery school teacher Lea Hedary Kreidi and her family racked their brains to see how they could help.

    Shortly after protests started, they launched a group on Facebook called "Made in Lebanon -- The Lebanese Products Group" to encourage Lebanese to buy locally produced goods.

    In just two months, they amassed more than 32,000 members, who post ads for locally or homemade goods, or ask for local alternatives to imported products.

    - 'Made in Lebanon' -

    "We're used to going shopping and buying what our mothers used to buy. We grab what's in front of us without checking if it's made in Lebanon or not," she said, seated at home by a sparkling Christmas tree.

    But there are locally made options for numerous products, including detergent, shampoo, nappies, peanut butter, ketchup, and children's building blocks.

    "I was surprised by how many things there were that I didn't know about," said the mother of a baby boy.

    In her drive to support her fellow citizens, Kreidi now skips her usual supermarket in favour of nearby small grocers.

    This Christmas, only the children in her family will be receiving presents, which will all be made in Lebanon.

    In Beirut, bar manager Rani al-Rajji says he is also having to adapt -- moving away from increasingly expensive imports while also remaining affordable.

    "As much as I can, I'm trying to lessen the blow so our guests don't feel they've lost their purchasing power and can no longer afford to go out," said the 43-year-old, who is also an architect.

    To do this, he and his co-founders are trying to increase local brands from a fifth to around a half of all bar and kitchen supplies.

    "We're trying to use local products for all those with an alternative made in Lebanon," he said, sitting at the bar.

    And they are also attempting to cut out unnecessary packaging and marketing costs, serving wine directly from the barrel and beer from the keg.

    "We can't replace everything, but we can try to give Lebanese products more life, encourage their consumption," he said.

    But some cash-strapped consumers say buying local is not their chief concern.

    In a Beirut supermarket, 35-year-old Mariam Rabbah clutched a nearly empty basket wondering what to buy with her diminished salary.

    "Everything is more expensive and we're now paid half," she said.

    "Now what we care about is if something is cheap and good quality -- not whether it's imported or Lebanese."
    Oh man I feel a bit guilty that I've just ordered sushi, while many Lebanese lost their jobs and are struggling to make ends meet.
     
    !Aoune32

    !Aoune32

    Well-Known Member
    Oh man I feel a bit guilty that I've just ordered sushi, while many Lebanese lost their jobs and are struggling to make ends meet.
    let them blame themselves and take responsibility for once for the shi* they are in.
     
    Lebmonage

    Lebmonage

    Legendary Member
    let them blame themselves and take responsibility for once for the shi* they are in.
    In a country where half the population or more didn't vote, amenities are shared along partisan lines. If you belong to a political party, you will not lack, even if you are struggling. That needs to change. We need governments that work for the citizens. Citizens have rights, not only members of political parties.

    I have been of the view that protesters should leave the streets. I am of the view we should give Diab a chance. I am of the view we should give the majority in parliament, voted last year, a chance to implement big and historical changes. But if these big changes are not implemented and some corrupt warlords think we are going back to the past because people are off the streets, they are mistaken. Next time, people won't leave the streets. They will remain until their heads roll on the ground like we saw in Arab countries and they and their families are hunted like preys. That, it seems, is the only language Arab tyrants and dictators (who hold on to chairs for decades) understand. And that would be bloody to imagine in a small country like Lebanon, where everyone is armed, and a divided one - thanks to these sectarian warlords.

    So now its time for them to work for the citizen - the ones that have no party affiliation before the ones affiliated to parties. It is also time for the others not in government to behave themselves and allow those in government to work. It isn't time to score political points or play games and act smart or conspire with foreign powers. If the worse happens in Lebanon, both those in government and outside government won't be spared by the people. The interests of those foreign powers too would be shaken, if not knocked. All those in parliament would be made to pay. So the in-fighting between March 8 and March 14 doesn't concern the starving, struggling, deprived, sick and poor Lebanese. They are all the same.

    They should work and secure citizens rights, not party members rights, and not be playing games. For the first time, the people are a threat and danger to all those in parliament.
     
    !Aoune32

    !Aoune32

    Well-Known Member
    In a country where half the population or more didn't vote, amenities are shared along partisan lines. If you belong to a political party, you will not lack, even if you are struggling. That needs to change. We need governments that work for the citizens. Citizens have rights, not only members of political parties.

    I have been of the view that protesters should leave the streets. I am of the view we should give Diab a chance. I am of the view we should give the majority in parliament, voted last year, a chance to implement big and historical changes. But if these big changes are not implemented and some corrupt warlords think we are going back to the past because people are off the streets, they are mistaken. Next time, people won't leave the streets. They will remain until their heads roll on the ground like we saw in Arab countries and they and their families are hunted like preys. That, it seems, is the only language Arab tyrants and dictators (who hold on to chairs for decades) understand. And that would be bloody to imagine in a small country like Lebanon, where everyone is armed, and a divided one - thanks to these sectarian warlords.

    So now its time for them to work for the citizen - the ones that have no party affiliation before the ones affiliated to parties. It is also time for the others not in government to behave themselves and allow those in government to work. It isn't time to score political points or play games and act smart or conspire with foreign powers. If the worse happens in Lebanon, both those in government and outside government won't be spared by the people. The interests of those foreign powers too would be shaken, if not knocked. All those in parliament would be made to pay. So the in-fighting between March 8 and March 14 doesn't concern the starving, struggling, deprived, sick and poor Lebanese. They are all the same.

    They should work and secure citizens rights, not party members rights, and not be playing games. For the first time, the people are a threat and danger to all those in parliament.
    most of what you said i agree with but...
    those who can vote and reside in lebanon voted. dont believe this 50% bullshit.
    we have 2 million voters who are residents and 1.5 million expats who are on the registered lists. the 2 million voters that reside 1.8 million voted which means approx 200K didnt hence the lower turnout in 2018 compared to 2009 which was about 52-53%
    other than that people are pathetic. let them fix their issues which has been ongoing for tens of years.
     
    shadow1

    shadow1

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Oh man I feel a bit guilty that I've just ordered sushi, while many Lebanese lost their jobs and are struggling to make ends meet.
    Let them eat cake.
    They had it too good for too long and now the country is afinancial basket case.
    Sooner or later that was bound to happen. The writing had been on the wall for decades.
    Vanity, self deception and self righteousness were too good to resist and now ... oh well no use crying over spilled milk.
    let natural selection take its course.
    No need for you to feel guilt because I cant make ends meet. When the going was good I didnt care about your religious beliefs or your culinary pleasures and now my dignity prevents me from caring still. I ll just join the crowd and wait for my rations from KSA and hope what I lose in this mortal life i can somehow be compensated for in the immortal life.

    As to whether the revolution expedited the downfall, it only unveiled it and forced people to see the blaring reality. Pretty tough for a country that subsisted on its delusions and illusions for so long.
    Oh if only I put my money where my mouth was! I could be eating Sushi too. Nothing but out of date hummus cans for me now. A life of asceticism to prepare myself for the day of judgement with forced purity and unwanted virtues and selflessness.

    Poor Lebanon shone so brightly for far too long and believed the lies it told about itself. Basita, in a couple of decades it will tread the same path all over again, always immune to common sense. You will survive on sushi no doubt but baked beans shall now be a delicacy of the past for me.
     
    Republican

    Republican

    Legendary Member
    The protesters killed the economy? Is this a joke?
    The economy was killed by the banks, as a matter of fact the entire country and its economy work as slave labor for the banks and its partners and board members.
    The country falls but not the banks, that's what Riad Haramé said in his last conference and has been repeating for a while now.
     
    Iron Maiden

    Iron Maiden

    Paragon of Bacon
    Orange Room Supporter
    The protesters killed the economy? Is this a joke?
    The economy was killed by the banks, as a matter of fact the entire country and its economy work as slave labor for the banks and its partners and board members.
    The country falls but not the banks, that's what Riad Haramé said in his last conference and has been repeating for a while now.
    denying that blocking roads and stopping businesses from operating for 3 weeks did not push the country’s private sector into the abyss after it had been tiptoeing around it is a joke too.

    the state has been dead for a while but the private sector has been brought down by the brainless closing of roads, no need to hide behind your finger.
     
    NewLeb

    NewLeb

    New Member
    It’s survival of the fittest. This is a great thing, as it allows for more innovation.
     
    D

    dyyyy

    Well-Known Member
    The first nine months of 2019 were good for tourism in Lebanon.
    It's the protests that killed the tourism industry.

    "On November 25, the SRCNP released another statement saying that out of 12,000 F&B outlets in Lebanon, 265 had closed down over the past two months (October and most of November), a figure which online restaurant directory and delivery app Zomato collaborated. In an interview with Executive, Tony Ramy, president of the syndicate, warned that if the situation continues like this, there could be as many as 400 outlets closed in a three month period (from start October to year’s end).

    denying that blocking roads and stopping businesses from operating for 3 weeks did not push the country’s private sector into the abyss after it had been tiptoeing around it is a joke too.

    the state has been dead for a while but the private sector has been brought down by the brainless closing of roads, no need to hide behind your finger.
    Guys the road blocks only happened the first week, and there isn't any country that collapsed because the road blocked for a week.

    The big elephant in the room is the banks that completely destroyed the economy.

    - Small businesses are unable to import goods or services from abroad,
    - All businesses counted on bank credits to pay, and this was eliminated
    - There are no more consumers because even the richest people have to live way below their means because their money are blocked.

    Not to mention that the banking sector was the main advantage in Lebanon, and now everyone who can is opening an account outside Lebanon and no one dares to transfer money to Lebanon anymore.

    Compared to this, the road blocks are nothing.
     
    Iron Maiden

    Iron Maiden

    Paragon of Bacon
    Orange Room Supporter
    Guys the road blocks only happened the first week, and there isn't any country that collapsed because the road blocked for a week.

    The big elephant in the room is the banks that completely destroyed the economy.

    - Small businesses are unable to import goods or services from abroad,
    - All businesses counted on bank credits to pay, and this was eliminated
    - There are no more consumers because even the richest people have to live way below their means because their money are blocked.

    Not to mention that the banking sector was the main advantage in Lebanon, and now everyone who can is opening an account outside Lebanon and no one dares to transfer money to Lebanon anymore.

    Compared to this, the road blocks are nothing.
    the banking sector’s hold on lebanese economics is not new, u can thank harirism for setting it up and institutionalizing it.
    BUT
    first off the road blocks were there for more than 2 weeks blocking mostly metn and beirut where most of the private sector and its workforce is located crippling it, not only blocking its clientelle but mostly its wirkforve at home.

    that led people to go on a cash craze and empty the local banks of their liquidity and stocking that liquidity in their houses.

    thise two factors combined completly handicaped the private sector, who now did not have access to credit nor its client base.
    the lebanese households now hold between 4-6 billion $ in liquidity that is going to waste and will only make robberies that much more interesting fir thieves.
     
    D

    dyyyy

    Well-Known Member
    the banking sector’s hold on lebanese economics is not new, u can thank harirism for setting it up and institutionalizing it.
    BUT
    first off the road blocks were there for more than 2 weeks blocking mostly metn and beirut where most of the private sector and its workforce is located crippling it, not only blocking its clientelle but mostly its wirkforve at home.

    that led people to go on a cash craze and empty the local banks of their liquidity and stocking that liquidity in their houses.

    thise two factors combined completly handicaped the private sector, who now did not have access to credit nor its client base.
    the lebanese households now hold between 4-6 billion $ in liquidity that is going to waste and will only make robberies that much more interesting fir thieves.
    nooo
    Remember the limits on withdraws started before 17 Oct, it's caused by Harirism, no argument here...in the end, we were gonna get here sooner or later, one we would have to actually pay our debt and it happened now.

    for the road blocks, bil ekhir this subjective, I live in Zalka, I didn't really feel them except the first week but maybe it depends on where you work and where you live.
     
    Tayyar9

    Tayyar9

    Legendary Member
    The main issue I have with the protesters is that they didn't know how to take advantage of the shock the first few days delivered to the political class, and instead of focusing on gaining reforms, they completely went off track and now it is one big mess for all of us, which is why they deserve some blame for where we are now. Instead of focusing on achievable goals, the demands are now completely unrealistic and we have no idea what they want anymore.
     
    Iron Maiden

    Iron Maiden

    Paragon of Bacon
    Orange Room Supporter
    nooo
    Remember the limits on withdraws started before 17 Oct, it's caused by Harirism, no argument here...in the end, we were gonna get here sooner or later, one we would have to actually pay our debt and it happened now.

    for the road blocks, bil ekhir this subjective, I live in Zalka, I didn't really feel them except the first week but maybe it depends on where you work and where you live.
    libancables one of the biggest manufacturers in the country had to clise for 2 weeks because their workforce and raw materials could not get to them. donu know how much money that is?

    this is but one example.

    from day one we were screaming to not kill off the suffocating economy and to protests in front of the mafia households and their businesses because blockingbthe avg joe at his house wuld nvr bring any change.

    this vounry is filled with hate, spite, shortsightedness and delusions of grandeur and u can see it on this forum galore.

    i really wish early elections would be held so that the same parliament would be voted again by this joke of a people
     
    Top