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Europe and The migrants influx

Elvis left the building

Legendary Member
and the madness continues. #AllahSnackbar

they used to do this alot in china

oppressed muslims would use vans and cars to run over pedestrians

now they just exported it to the west and europe

this is not the first incident of this type in the last few month

we had another in the states in a college in ohio
 

HannaTheCrusader

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
The 3 pillars of liberalism on this forum will disagree with the German assessment and call sit islamophobic

The new sicarii
The fake Arab Stormie
The god knows who citizen

They support the Muslim terrorists coming to USA

End of Merkel? German leader pictured minutes after Berlin attack as she honoured migrants
GERMAN Chancellor Angela Merkel has cancelled a public appearance today and addressed the people of Germany but it can be revealed she was at a service honouring migrants when her own people lay dead in Berlin's streets.
By SIOBHAN MCFADYEN
PUBLISHED: 09:12, Tue, Dec 20, 2016 | UPDATED: 12:27, Tue, Dec 20, 201
372

Mrs Merkel was attending an event to promote her failing migrant policy as a lorry was hijacked in Berlin.

She was photographed looking forlorn just seven minutes after the murder of 12 people took place at the Christmas market just three miles away from the scene.

And her own party is now calling the killing of innocent victims a "war" situation saying they will put "machine guns" on the street.



RELATED ARTICLES
GETTY

Mrs Merkel was attending an event for migrants while the attack happened
We must state that we are in a state of war, although some people who want to see only the good can not see

Klaus Bouillon of Mrs Merkel's CDU

Now as calls for the 62-year-old to resign grow, opposition politicians are calling on the Christian Democrat leader to completely re-evaluate her policy on immigration.

Germany has accepted 1.1m refugees into the country with police having launched a raid this morning on a refugee camp in a disused airport in Berlin.

Police sources have now said a 23-year-old Pakistani called Naved B who was housed by the state in Berlin is not the suspect and that the suspect is on the run and armed.

Mrs Merkel is yet to comment on this news.



Mrs Merkel has cancelled today's electoral visit to Mecklenburg-Vorpommern but spoke to the public during a televised press conference.

She said: "This is a very difficult day."

However it has been confirmed by a spokesman for the constituency office in Greifswald that she has cancelled her public appearance as she confirmed she is to visit the scene of the crash.

The chancellor wanted to visit Rügen, Stralsund and Greifswald during her short visit before Christmas.

IS THIS THE END FOR MERKEL? TIMELINE OF HER REIGN

Reuters

Mrs Merkel was pictured minutes after the attack
Now as social media has erupted with calls for the leader of Germany to resign Ms Merkel's party has furiously hit out describing the situation as a "state of war."

German politician Klaus Bouillon of Mrs Merkel's CDU party said told Saarland radio: "We must state that we are in a state of war, although some people who want to see only the good can not see.

Bouillon announced intensified security measures amid fears there could be more attacks today.

"We will take it wherever we think it is necessary," said Bouillon. "That means long-range weapons, short weapons, machine guns," even if this sounds martial.
 
مصدر أمني لوكالة أعماق: منفذ عملية الدهس في مدينة برلين الألمانية هو جندي للدولة الإسلامية ونفذ العملية استجابة لنداءات استهداف رعايا دول التحالف الدولي
 

Indie

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
In the Wake of Berlin: What Now for Merkel?
by JOHN WIGHT

It would be hard to find a leader who has suffered as sharp a reversal in popularity as Germany’s Angela Merkel. Her open door policy towards refugees and migrants in 2015 has resulted in political blowback, which in the wake of the terrorist atrocity in Berlin may well reach the point of no return with a German general election looming in 2017.

At time of writing authorities in Germany are still to apprehend the person or persons responsible for an attack involving an articulated truck being driven at speed through a Christmas market, plowing into men, women, and children in a chilling reminder of the attack which took place in Nice in the south of France back in July, on the evening of the country’s annual Bastille Day celebrations. 84 people were killed on that occasion, while the perpetrator was shot dead by French police at the scene. In Berlin 12 people were killed, including the original driver of the truck that was used, while a further 49 have been injured, some critically.

As with the terrorist atrocity in Nice, credit for its Berlin counterpart has been claimed by Daesh. However this may be a case of opportunism on the part of the Salafi-jihadist terrorist organization. Even so, it does not take a genius to discern an Islamist motive behind Berlin despite the fact that those responsible have yet to be apprehended.

Soon after the attack, German police arrested a 24-year old Pakistani asylum seeker, only to later release him, citing lack of evidence; this after the media had widely reported that he was the individual responsible. The resulting confusion has only added to the anger being levelled at both the authorities and the government. It replicates the anger that was unleashed in the country in the wake of the myriad sexual assaults that took place in Cologne last winter, with allegations that refugees and migrants were responsible for attacking dozens of women during the city’s public New Year festivities. The lack of a vigorous response by the police on that occasion helped fuel anti-immigrant sentiment that was already rising.

Cologne and now Berlin are being linked to Merkel’s decision to allow more than a million refugees into Germany during the vast exodus from countries such as Syria, Libya, Afghanistan, and Somalia in the summer of 2015. The majority of them arrived after a perilous journey across the Mediterranean, setting sail in all manner of vessels, most of which were unsafe. Thousands drowned in the attempt, among them women and children. It was a tragedy that continues to to this day.

Angela Merkel’s decision to extend a welcoming hand to so many refugees was widely applauded within Germany and beyond at the time, viewed as a welcome rejoinder to the alarming growth of nationalist and right wing populist sentiment across Europe. Indeed it was considered a rare example of compassion in a world leader towards people who’d seen their lives turned upside down as a result of conflict, immiseration, and ensuing societal collapse.

Thousands of German citizens turned out at train stations and bus stations to welcome the incoming refugees with parcels of food and clothing. Donations to funds set up to help them flooded in as part of a national eruption of compassion and kindness that had suddenly taken root.

Merkel herself said “We can do it” when it came to opening Germany’s borders to so many people in such a short space of time last year. She later went on to opine, “If we now start to apologize for showing a friendly face in emergency situations, then this is no longer my country.“

Those words have now come back to haunt a leader whose popularity was once so high no rival candidate could have hoped to mount a serious bid to unseat her. This is no longer the case. Her party, the Christian Democratic Union (CDU), suffered a significant setback in German regional elections in Merkel’s home state of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, coming in third behind the Social Democratic Party (SPD), and the right wing populist party Alternative für Deutschland (AfD), running on an anti-immigration platform.

Merkel has seen her own popularity plunge to a five year low, this according to a nationwide opinion poll taken at the beginning of September. It is hard to imagine that her polling figures will not plunge even lower in the wake of the terrorist attack in Berlin. With a German general election scheduled next year, as mentioned, and with Merkel hoping to be elected for a fourth term as chancellor, suddenly she appears vulnerable.

Truly we are living in chaotic times, wherein terrorism and the fear of terrorism is the new normal. Compassion towards those whose plight refutes our right to consider ourselves civilized is understandably tempered by the threat of this terrorist menace. Refugees and asylum seekers have moral and human rights to sanctuary. They are victims of the moral sickness that is the Western doctrine of regime change. It is really quite simple: no regime change no refugee crisis.

What is not simple is balancing the rights of desperate human beings fleeing the chaos created by war and conflict with the rights of people across Europe to be safe from the threat of indiscriminate slaughter. It is not irrational either this fear, though it is one being cynically exploited by the far right, which has seen its fortunes across the West improve to an extent not witnessed since the 1930s, under similar conditions of economic and political crisis.

Absorbing one million people in a short space of time, and without serious consultation or consideration of the consequences to social cohesion, was in hindsight a calamitous knee jerk reaction on the part of the German chancellor.

It is one that may very well prove her political epitaph.

In the Wake of Berlin: What Now for Merkel?
 

nonsense

Legendary Member
new years eve drinking game :
for every rape or sexual harassment in Germany drink one shot .
What % of rape or sexual harassment in Germany is committed by migrants? And what % by Germans?
...just so we know how many shots to drink for whom.
 

HannaTheCrusader

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
In the Wake of Berlin: What Now for Merkel?
by JOHN WIGHT

It would be hard to find a leader who has suffered as sharp a reversal in popularity as Germany’s Angela Merkel. Her open door policy towards refugees and migrants in 2015 has resulted in political blowback, which in the wake of the terrorist atrocity in Berlin may well reach the point of no return with a German general election looming in 2017.

At time of writing authorities in Germany are still to apprehend the person or persons responsible for an attack involving an articulated truck being driven at speed through a Christmas market, plowing into men, women, and children in a chilling reminder of the attack which took place in Nice in the south of France back in July, on the evening of the country’s annual Bastille Day celebrations. 84 people were killed on that occasion, while the perpetrator was shot dead by French police at the scene. In Berlin 12 people were killed, including the original driver of the truck that was used, while a further 49 have been injured, some critically.

As with the terrorist atrocity in Nice, credit for its Berlin counterpart has been claimed by Daesh. However this may be a case of opportunism on the part of the Salafi-jihadist terrorist organization. Even so, it does not take a genius to discern an Islamist motive behind Berlin despite the fact that those responsible have yet to be apprehended.

Soon after the attack, German police arrested a 24-year old Pakistani asylum seeker, only to later release him, citing lack of evidence; this after the media had widely reported that he was the individual responsible. The resulting confusion has only added to the anger being levelled at both the authorities and the government. It replicates the anger that was unleashed in the country in the wake of the myriad sexual assaults that took place in Cologne last winter, with allegations that refugees and migrants were responsible for attacking dozens of women during the city’s public New Year festivities. The lack of a vigorous response by the police on that occasion helped fuel anti-immigrant sentiment that was already rising.

Cologne and now Berlin are being linked to Merkel’s decision to allow more than a million refugees into Germany during the vast exodus from countries such as Syria, Libya, Afghanistan, and Somalia in the summer of 2015. The majority of them arrived after a perilous journey across the Mediterranean, setting sail in all manner of vessels, most of which were unsafe. Thousands drowned in the attempt, among them women and children. It was a tragedy that continues to to this day.

Angela Merkel’s decision to extend a welcoming hand to so many refugees was widely applauded within Germany and beyond at the time, viewed as a welcome rejoinder to the alarming growth of nationalist and right wing populist sentiment across Europe. Indeed it was considered a rare example of compassion in a world leader towards people who’d seen their lives turned upside down as a result of conflict, immiseration, and ensuing societal collapse.

Thousands of German citizens turned out at train stations and bus stations to welcome the incoming refugees with parcels of food and clothing. Donations to funds set up to help them flooded in as part of a national eruption of compassion and kindness that had suddenly taken root.

Merkel herself said “We can do it” when it came to opening Germany’s borders to so many people in such a short space of time last year. She later went on to opine, “If we now start to apologize for showing a friendly face in emergency situations, then this is no longer my country.“

Those words have now come back to haunt a leader whose popularity was once so high no rival candidate could have hoped to mount a serious bid to unseat her. This is no longer the case. Her party, the Christian Democratic Union (CDU), suffered a significant setback in German regional elections in Merkel’s home state of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, coming in third behind the Social Democratic Party (SPD), and the right wing populist party Alternative für Deutschland (AfD), running on an anti-immigration platform.

Merkel has seen her own popularity plunge to a five year low, this according to a nationwide opinion poll taken at the beginning of September. It is hard to imagine that her polling figures will not plunge even lower in the wake of the terrorist attack in Berlin. With a German general election scheduled next year, as mentioned, and with Merkel hoping to be elected for a fourth term as chancellor, suddenly she appears vulnerable.

Truly we are living in chaotic times, wherein terrorism and the fear of terrorism is the new normal. Compassion towards those whose plight refutes our right to consider ourselves civilized is understandably tempered by the threat of this terrorist menace. Refugees and asylum seekers have moral and human rights to sanctuary. They are victims of the moral sickness that is the Western doctrine of regime change. It is really quite simple: no regime change no refugee crisis.

What is not simple is balancing the rights of desperate human beings fleeing the chaos created by war and conflict with the rights of people across Europe to be safe from the threat of indiscriminate slaughter. It is not irrational either this fear, though it is one being cynically exploited by the far right, which has seen its fortunes across the West improve to an extent not witnessed since the 1930s, under similar conditions of economic and political crisis.

Absorbing one million people in a short space of time, and without serious consultation or consideration of the consequences to social cohesion, was in hindsight a calamitous knee jerk reaction on the part of the German chancellor.

It is one that may very well prove her political epitaph.

In the Wake of Berlin: What Now for Merkel?

now she cant buy win at will

Furious Tesco shopper is ordered to 'go and join another queue' by Muslim cashier who refused to sell him a bottle of wine because it was 'against her religion'
  • Lee Saunders, 35, refused sale of a £4 bottle of wine by Muslim worker at Tesco
  • She would not serve him due to 'religious beliefs' and asked him to queue again
  • Father-of-three Mr Saunders, of Feltham, said he was left 'miffed and baffled'
  • Tesco said a duty manager served him in 'pragmatic approach' to the problem


Read more: Muslim Tesco cashier refuses to sell a bottle of wine to a shopper because it was 'against her religion' | Daily Mail Online
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
 

HannaTheCrusader

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
Imagine my shock
A mosque goer , hmmmmmm

Berlin truck jihad attacker’s accomplice arrested, often visited mosques

DECEMBER 29, 2016 7:56 AM BY CHRISTINE WILLIAMSLEAVE A COMMENT

The 40 year old alleged Tunisian accomplice was said to have been discovered after investigators came across his contact details in the phone of the main suspect in the deadly truck attack, Anis Amri. Note also that another report indicated about Amri that…..

Since the end of 2015, he regularly commuted between Berlin and the Ruhr region where he is believed to have visited a dozen mosques. The 24-year-old Tunisian is also thought to have had particularly good contacts in Dortmund and to have possessed a key to a mosque where he stayed overnight.

A plethora of reports have noted that there are numerous jihad-supporting and/or jihad-preaching mosques in Western countries. Those countries should implement a surveillance system and shut down those mosques that contribute to the mobilization, recruitment or training of jihad terrorists.



“Berlin police arrest Christmas market attacker’s alleged accomplice”, by Ben Rossington, Mirror, December 26, 2016:

Six days after jihadi Anis Amri was shot dead by police in Italy, security services raided the home and business premises of a fellow Tunisian living in Berlin.

German police swooped today to arrest an alleged accomplice of the Berlin market attacker.

Six days after jihadi Anis Amri , 24, was shot dead by police in Italy, security services raided the home and business premises of a fellow Tunisian living in Berlin.

Sources said the 40-year-old’s phone number was found in Amri’s mobile and had been called numerous times in the run-up to December 19, when Amri ploughed a hijacked HGV into a packed Christmas market , killing 12.

Amri, who had pledged allegiance to the so-called Islamic State, is thought to have dumped his phone alongside his ID papers in the cab of the 20-tonne truck so he could not be traced while on the run.

Refusing to give any more details on the suspected accomplice, the office of Germany’s federal prosecutor said: ”Further investigations indicate that he could have been involved in the attack.

“To what extent suspicions against the arrested person will be hardened up remains to be seen after further investigation….
 

Iron Maiden

Paragon of Bacon
Orange Room Supporter
a great outcry by a german utuber abt his country's MSM following the berlin attack and the complicity of the tunisian govt., u cant fake that kind of outrage.. a great watch

 
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