• Before posting an article from a specific source, check this list here to see how much the Orange Room trust it. You can also vote/change your vote based on the source track record.

Filmmaking and Filmmakers

Dr. Strangelove

Dr. Strangelove

Nuclear War Expert
Staff member
Few art forms have the capacity to capture our hearts and minds the way filmmaking does. Through this thread, I hope we can discuss and celebrate this art form and those who practice it, be they directors, cinematographers, screenwriters, editors or producers.

This isn't a thread about movies. Rather, it's a thread about the people who make them and their methods. Essays, videos or your own opinion - please feel free to contribute in whatever way you like.

“If it can be written, or thought, it can be filmed.”
― Stanley Kubrick
 
  • Advertisement
  • Dr. Strangelove

    Dr. Strangelove

    Nuclear War Expert
    Staff member
    Denis Villeneuve is, in my opinion, one of modern filmmaking's true geniuses. This video is a fitting tribute, and provides wonderful insight into how his mind sees film, in his own words.

     
    Resign

    Resign

    Well-Known Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    noteworthy filmmakers and techniques i like
    Of course, next to Denis Villeneuve

    Quinten's ability to have different running stories simultaneously while they have nothing in common in the end they all connect in a most hilarious way
    Guy Richie does something very similar in Lock, Stock and two smoking barrels

    Christopher Nolan's memento was also an awesome experience of a movie that goes backwards

    Coen brothers Fargo,
    Maybe it's a combination of excellent acting, dialogue choices more than directing
    It's a black comedy, will truly stressful almost all the time, it's an excellent experience from start to finish.


    In general, i enjoy mysteries in movies (i assume same as you)
    something that promises you a good ending from the very beginning and keeps you on the edge of your seat the whole movie, sometimes going through nonsense, yet you keep going and get hit with an awesome ending, or simply watching the dots connect themselves as you go though the movie.
    I think all of the above directors are very good at that.
     
    Iron Maiden

    Iron Maiden

    Paragon of Bacon
    Orange Room Supporter
    good idea for a thread, but i think that today’s indie movies and short films are the hidden gems compared to whats coming out of hollywood, just like in the videogame indusry, AAA titles have lost all meaning behind them and serve no purpose other that being cash cows.

    not very long ago i made this thread to showcase a friend of mine’s work. watch out for him, hes got plenty more from where that cane from

     
    Dr. Strangelove

    Dr. Strangelove

    Nuclear War Expert
    Staff member
    noteworthy filmmakers and techniques i like
    Of course, next to Denis Villeneuve

    Quinten's ability to have different running stories simultaneously while they have nothing in common in the end they all connect in a most hilarious way
    Guy Richie does something very similar in Lock, Stock and two smoking barrels

    Christopher Nolan's memento was also an awesome experience of a movie that goes backwards

    Coen brothers Fargo,
    Maybe it's a combination of excellent acting, dialogue choices more than directing
    It's a black comedy, will truly stressful almost all the time, it's an excellent experience from start to finish.


    In general, i enjoy mysteries in movies (i assume same as you)
    something that promises you a good ending from the very beginning and keeps you on the edge of your seat the whole movie, sometimes going through nonsense, yet you keep going and get hit with an awesome ending, or simply watching the dots connect themselves as you go though the movie.
    I think all of the above directors are very good at that.
    You just named many of my all-time favorite directors. Quentin Tarantino, in particular - I'm a huge fan of his.

     
    Picasso

    Picasso

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    The Irishman | Martin Scorsese Directing - Behind the Scenes | Netflix



    Martin Scorsese on the making of 'The Irishman'

     
    Last edited:
    Picasso

    Picasso

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Few art forms have the capacity to capture our hearts and minds the way filmmaking does. Through this thread, I hope we can discuss and celebrate this art form and those who practice it, be they directors, cinematographers, screenwriters, editors or producers.

    This isn't a thread about movies. Rather, it's a thread about the people who make them and their methods. Essays, videos or your own opinion - please feel free to contribute in whatever way you like.

    “If it can be written, or thought, it can be filmed.”
    ― Stanley Kubrick
    But how can you celebrate their art without talking about their movies?

    I reckon it shouldn't be about the movie itself, though at the same time, it's what the matter is all about when you want to explore their work. What we can do then is experiencing the movies through them.

    Can you also present an example of how you intend to celebrate the art of the producers other than naming them? Unless we are about to delve into the hiring & selecting process, then that would be interesting, especially if we can have access to such materials such as why this director and not the other, or this actor/ actresses and not the other, selecting the script, though the logistics and financing side wouldn't be that interesting for us here.
     
    Last edited:
    Picasso

    Picasso

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    The Art of Documentary Filmmaking

     
    Dr. Strangelove

    Dr. Strangelove

    Nuclear War Expert
    Staff member
    But how can you celebrate their art without talking about their movies?

    I reckon it shouldn't be about the movie itself, though at the same time, it's what the matter is all about when you want to explore their work. What we can do then is experiencing the movies through them.
    My intention was to softly nudge potential participants from a "this film is cool" to a "what this filmmaker does in this film is cool" line of thinking. The filmmaker as the central axis around which the discussion revolves, rather than the work itself. What the filmmaker does, how he does it and why he does it.

    We all love movies, of course, and we'd all love to discuss them. After all, as you said, this is what it's all about at the end of the day. My raging inner film nerd wants this thread to avoid becoming just another film recommendation thread, that's all. A look at film through the focus of its creatorS (with a capital S).

    Can you also present an example of how you intend to celebrate the art of the producers other than naming them? Unless we are about to delve into the hiring & selecting process, then that would be interesting, especially if we can have access to such materials such as why this director and not the other, or this actor/ actresses and not the other, selecting the script, though the logistics and financing side wouldn't be that interesting for us here.
    You're right, that would be rather fascinating! But with producers, I find that, oftentimes, the most captivating thing about what they do is the stories. Producers seem to have the best stories in the film industry. In 1925, Irving Thalberg went from being a humble office assistant to becoming head of production at MGM at only 26 of age. The man produced 400 films before he died 12 years later, among a myriad of other achievements.

    Here's a trailer for The Kid Stays in the Picture (2002), a documentary about legendary producer Robert Evan's rise, fall and rebirth. I've been meaning to watch it for a while, but it might give you an idea of what I mean.
     
    Top