Gigantic Hurricane Sandy bears down U.S. East Coast

Hawkeye

Active Member
Staff member
Super Penguin
Sandy, expected to come ashore late on Monday, could deliver a harsh blow to major cities in its target zone including New York, Philadelphia, Washington, Baltimore and Boston. Its centre was forecast to strike New York-New Jersey area and then move inland toward Philadelphia and the rest of Pennsylvania.

The sheer size of the storm meant its effects would be felt from the mid-Atlantic states to New England. Officials warned of widespread power outages that could last for days.

In New York City, subway, bus and train service will be suspended on Sunday evening and up to 375,000 people were ordered to evacuate from low-lying areas.

President Barack Obama, speaking after a briefing at the federal government's storm response centre in Washington, called Sandy a "serious and big storm" and asked residents to heed the orders of state and local authorities to protect themselves from its onslaught.

"It's a very, very large system," National Hurricane Centre Director Rick Knabb said. "The storm is going to carve a pretty large swath of bad weather, both water and wind."

The storm could bring the country's financial nerve centre to a standstill, although the major Wall Street exchanges said they planned to open as usual on Monday because they have alternative facilities they can use.

Worried residents in the hurricane's path packed stores, searching for generators, flashlights, batteries, food and other supplies in anticipation of power outages.

New York City schools will be shut on Monday. Other local governments also announced school closures.

Gale-force winds were already starting to buffet Virginia and could reach other parts of the mid-Atlantic coast on Sunday night. Tens of millions of people will feel its bluster for as long as two days, Knabb said.

Forecasters said Sandy was a rare, hybrid "super storm" created by an Arctic jet stream wrapping itself around a tropical storm, possibly causing up to 12 inches (30 cm) of rain in some areas, as well as up to 2 feet (60 cm) of snowfall in the Appalachian Mountains from West Virginia to Kentucky.

It could be the largest storm to hit the United States, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) website.

Sandy was already disrupting transportation systems. More than 700 flights, including international ones, were cancelled on Sunday and nearly 2,500 more were cancelled for Monday, FlightAware.com said.

CASINOS CLOSE

New Jersey casinos were ordered to close and state officials decided to shut bus and rail systems by early on Monday.

Governors in other states put National Guard troops on alert. "We're just asking people to be patient and be ready for a long haul. But we have a very aggressive power restoration program in place and I think we're ready," Virginia Governor Robert McDonnell told the CNN program "State of the Union."

In Washington, Obama said officials had assured him that they had all the resources they needed in place, and he stressed that "it is important for us to respond big and to respond fast" to the hurricane's onslaught.

"We're going to cut through red tape and we're not going to get bogged down in a lot of rules," said Obama, who was having to juggle both is re-election bid and his efforts to stay on top of the storm's impact just nine days before Election Day.

Sandy blew the presidential race off course, forcing Obama and Republican challenger Mitt Romney to cancel scheduled campaign stops. It fuelled fears that the storm could disrupt early voting ahead of the November 6 election.

INSURERS PREPARE FOR STORM

U.S. stock exchanges and Wall Street banks were sending employees into Manhattan on Sunday to stay in hotels and co-workers' homes, as markets prepared to open for business on Monday even as Sandy brought public transportation to a halt.

Insurers also prepared for the storm's arrival, activating claims teams, staging adjusters near the locations most likely to be affected and generally getting ready to pay for a potentially huge volume of losses.

While Sandy's 75 mph (120 kph) winds were not overwhelming for a hurricane, its exceptional width means the winds will last as long as two days, wearing down trees, roofs and buildings and piling up rainfall and storm surge.

Hurricane-force winds extended 175 miles (280 km) from the centre of the asymmetrical storm, while its lesser tropical storm-force winds spanned 850 miles (1,368 km) in diameter.

"That's gigantic," said Chris Landsea, the hurricane centre's science and operations officer.

At high tide, it could bring a surge of seawater up to 11 feet (3.4 meters) above ground level to Long Island Sound and New York Harbour, forecasters said.

"Given the large wind field associated with Sandy, elevated water levels could span multiple tide cycles, resulting in repeated and extended periods of coastal and bay side flooding," the forecasters said.

Sandy was centred about 250 miles (400 km) southeast of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, or 575 miles (930 km) south of New York City at midday on Sunday, the hurricane centre said. It pushed seawater up over the barrier islands off North Carolina known as the Outer Banks.

"It's flooded all over the village," long-time Ocracoke Island resident Kathleen O'Neal told Reuters. "I would say between a foot and two feet of water."

Sandy was moving over the Atlantic parallel to the U.S. coast at 10 mph (17 kph), but was forecast to make a tight westward turn toward the U.S. coast on Sunday night.

Sandy killed at least 66 people as it made its way through the Caribbean islands, including 51 in Haiti, mostly from flash flooding and mudslides, according to authorities.
 

Almaza

Member
You would think the Jets would play a decent game of football for New York before Hurricane Sandy killed us all tomorrow. :rolleyes:

If anyone on the forum lives in the area, stay safe, stay indoors. These things tend to be blown out of proportion but it's never a smart idea to challenge them.
 

Libnene Qu7

Super Ultra Senior Member
Orange Room Supporter
My brother lives in Boston. I hope you guys all stay safe. This is me, Libnene Qu7, signing off from Dubai, where we don't know the meaning of the word "hurricane" (or even rain for that matter).
 

X

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
[VBTUBE]yXMU2qwCVag[/VBTUBE]
LIVE Hurricane Sandy Coverage - The Weather Channel
 

Almaza

Member
Last night, the MTA here in New York closed all transportation. The subway and trains have not been running since. Most tunnels are closing soon or have been closed. When the wind picks up the bridges might close. The general theme is do not leave your homes.

The storm is still hundreds of miles away from the coast and there's already been heavy rain and some strong winds. Much of New Jersey and Long Island are seeing some serious floods. Parts of the city were evacuated yesterday. Floods are starting in parts of the city.

Schools are closed today and tomorrow. Most people are not working either. Streets are virtually empty. I went out like an hour ago and every shop on the block was closed.

Governor Chris Christie of New Jersey wasn't very relieving in his speech. He pretty much said "the risk of massive damage and death is high, but kids (he emphasized children), don't be alarmed." :confused:

They're predicting power cuts soon, so some residents might get a Lebanese taste of life. :msnrolleyes:

Otherwise, life is good. :thumbup1:
 

Almaza

Member
why the big fuss about a category 1 hurricane?

Primarily because the areas it's hitting are crucial, out-of-the-ordinary places. These storms usually happen in the Southeast. Not in New York/New Jersey. These are heavily populated areas, very important for business, and not generally knowledgeable or experienced about how to handle hurricanes. They have to play it better safe than sorry.

Also, the storm is not capable of dying off into the Atlantic and there's a cold front coming in the Midwest to the East that could collide with it and grow into a fiercer storm.

It's not as big of a deal as some might think. I'm certainly not worried. But these things can't be afforded to be taken lightly. It won't hit until midnight Eastern time so we won't know how bad it will be until then.
 

L'arbalette

Well-Known Member
Guys, I live in a high rise just by the Hudson. We were ordered to evacuate but we stayed in (half of the building did the same).

People are jogging / /running outside, just near the river (which isn't very smart). Water is rising but the winds, while high, are definitely manageable (not tree branch broken yet)... Will keep you posted. My main concern now is power outage
 

Danny Z

Legendary Member
why the big fuss about a category 1 hurricane?

The infrastructure in New York is not designed for a hurricane even category 1, the subway can get inundated. Several areas of Manhattan are supported by man made walls where the Ocean used to rule that if they fail can do worse harms that in New Orleans, first responders will have to risk their lives to save others.
Bottom line, they take no unnecessary risks and evacuate everyone for a day than risk some lives, unlike Cuba where they say we will weather it and have 20 deaths. Still you see people who don't want to listen and think they can swim in high waters so they go on the beach watch the waves, two of them went missing in Atlantic city.
 

Al Muqawama

Legendary Member
285747_10151294510183760_1085854715_n.jpg


Long Beach, NY

:eek:
 

L'arbalette

Well-Known Member
Just got an automated call from Con Ed. They will turn off electricity as a prevention (if stations get innondated)...
Wainak ya Gebran Bassil ? :)
 

cedarheart

Legendary Member
why the big fuss about a category 1 hurricane?

It's not really a huge deal but a good reason to be concerned:
-better be safe than sorry
-Better be prepared, and some infrastructure are so outdated that they can't even withstand heavy rain
-since Katrina in 2005, FEMA and the white house can not afford a **** up anymore, especially one week from presidential elections day
-US media strive on news like that so they tend to exaggerate things

in 2010, I was caught in a storm in NYC that wasn't even category 1, the wind was so strong, i was driving across the Washington bridge the car was pushed on the side by the wind, big trucks couldn't stand the wind. I'm not sure how but i was able to make it safely across the bridge. If it was category 1 i think a truck who have fell on me or the car would have been smashed against the bridge sides.
 
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