Gulf leaks

joseph_lubnan

Legendary Member
you mean like a video tape with aoun taking bags of money ?! No. But I know for sure that HA sent money to Aoun at least during the previous elections.

Saudi and the Islamic Republic of Iran have different styles :) The Islamic Republic is more elegantly graceful in buying influence. You see they gave the money to the Islamic Resistance in Lebanon which in turn made a donation to the Baqshbassilian sa7wa charities and finally Bassil told Aoun that he won the lottery :)
 

elAshtar

Legendary Member
Saudi and the Islamic Republic of Iran have different styles :) The Islamic Republic is more elegantly graceful in buying influence. You see they gave the money to the Islamic Resistance in Lebanon which in turn made a donation to the Baqshbassilian sa7wa charities and finally Bassil told Aoun that he won the lottery :)
No, Iran is not buying influence. Iran never buys influence through money. Unlike Geagea, Aoun never claimed to do whatever Iran wants him to do for money. Aoun simply take his decisions based on his own evaluation. Since he is an ally to HA, it is not surprise that he gets some help from him :). This is what allies do.
Geagea clearly stated that he is ready to do what Saudi kingdom sees fit in return of money. This makes him a slave :) not an ally.
 

joseph_lubnan

Legendary Member
ما في على ضميرنا لا دم ولا عمالة ولا عمولة...

I generally agree with you (comparatively) but I feel compelled to give you a technical answer, because what you said is wrong in its emphatic delivery:

Damm: A key side in wars that proved to be useless when Aoun took over after Gemayyel.

3amele: Fayez Karam was convicted.

3omoole: it is generally beleived that FPM receives funds and political backing from the Islamic Republic of Iran, at least through the Islamic Resistance in Lebanon. (Forgive me but I do not have Tehran leaks yet:))
 

joseph_lubnan

Legendary Member
No, Iran is not buying influence. Iran never buys influence through money. Unlike Geagea, Aoun never claimed to do whatever Iran wants him to do for money. Aoun simply take his decisions based on his own evaluation. Since he is an ally to HA, it is not surprise that he gets some help from him :). This is what allies do.
Geagea clearly stated that he is ready to do what Saudi kingdom sees fit in return of money. This makes him a slave :) not an ally.

I already told you the Islamic Republic is elegantly graceful!! :) what else do you want from me :)
 

nonsense

Legendary Member
you mean like a video tape with aoun taking bags of money ?! No. But I know for sure that HA sent money to Aoun at least during the previous elections.

Well, you are so sure and don't have any evidence. Maybe some reasoning that this is what allies do - but that is not necessarily the case among allies, if you even call them that. I would more see it as an intersection of some interests.

Anyway, in my book, if you accept donations that is the same as buying influence. A living human being no matter how principled will be influenced by receiving money, at the conscious and subconscious level.
 

joseph_lubnan

Legendary Member
HA's Mohammad Yazbek's son selling arms to FSA
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Where is the memo?
 

kmarthe

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
I generally agree with you (comparatively) but I feel compelled to give you a technical answer, because what you said is wrong in its emphatic delivery:

Damm: A key side in wars that proved to be useless when Aoun took over after Gemayyel.

3amele: Fayez Karam was convicted.

3omoole: it is generally beleived that FPM receives funds and political backing from the Islamic Republic of Iran, at least through the Islamic Resistance in Lebanon. (Forgive me but I do not have Tehran leaks yet:))

I would have to answer you because you raised points with misleading information:

Damm: The FPM was created after the end of the war, if you hint to the participation in the different conflicts of the 1975-1990 wars, everyone participated and some had to to defend their existence.

3amele: Where is Fayez Karam now? He was put out of FPM immediately following his conviction and he is one rotten fruit among thousands of good fruits, so you cannot generalize.

3omoole: Yes please get us the Teheran leaks and we continue the discussions.

Back to no debates with you.
 

Amirkani

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
The ambassador did not hear that from an HA source but from a source he thinks is close to HA. Did you for instance think that this source may have been lying to the Saudi ambassador? There is nothing that prevents HA from exposing Ali Bazzi if he was an american spy. HA has already exposed high ranking officers within its military and security units just for the reminder!
Shou ye3ni American spy? I am an Anerican citizen and meet with American officials all the time because I chose to be involved in both Lebanese and American politics. Does that make me a spy? Many of you don't realize it but Ali is also an American citizen and before he moved to Lebanon he held an official post in the U.S. in a municipality.

I am friends with Ali and meet with him whenever I happen to be in Lebanon or he visits the U.S. We meet socially as friends and rarely talk politics. I wouldn't know whether he's a spy or not but considering his background and that by virtue of his career he meets with American officials, it's very easy for someone to start such rumors about him and for others (especially foes) to believe them.

There is no evidence against the guy, so we can leave it at that.

P.S. According to Bandar I too, like Ali, am a CIA agent :)
 

Dirty Dragon

Well-Known Member
It can be a gray area who is a CIA "agent" and who is not. Anyone who meets with officials or especially diplomats could be meeting with CIA agents. That doesn't mean they are an informant who gets paid by the CIA to sell information or help them in their operations. These channels could also go two ways, example HA could know that a diplomat is a CIA agent and use that knowledge to their advantage without cutting contact. At this point in time I wouldn't be surprised if HA had direct contacts with CIA anyway.

About the leaks overall, I will quote a post I made in 2010:
I'm very suspicious of this leak package. I don't know how authentic all or some of them are, but they don't tell anything particularly shocking or revealing and for the most part leave Israel out and even work to it's benefit.

Julian Assange praised Natanyahu for his view that the leaks would aid diplomacy. Turkey is saying Israel engineered the leaks. Of course Natanyahu will be pleased if the leaks are selective and tailored.

Probably the single revelation that is gaining most headlines is the Saudi request to attack Iran. The idea being that leaking this will bring more to the public the hidden alliance between Israel and the Arabs, to make it more acceptable and to test the waters of the Arab street. Very convenient time to make a point that the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is not the source of instability but rather Iran, just when the negotiations between Palestinians and Israel came to a halt and Israel is being universally blamed for it.

Don't clap blindly, there is nothing particularly useful in the leaks in the first place.

We have different wind conditions now but it is the same principal... leaks exposing dirty secrets between Shia and Sunni regional powers.
 

Republican

Legendary Member
It can be a gray area who is a CIA "agent" and who is not. Anyone who meets with officials or especially diplomats could be meeting with CIA agents. That doesn't mean they are an informant who gets paid by the CIA to sell information or help them in their operations. These channels could also go two ways, example HA could know that a diplomat is a CIA agent and use that knowledge to their advantage without cutting contact. At this point in time I wouldn't be surprised if HA had direct contacts with CIA anyway.

About the leaks overall, I will quote a post I made in 2010:


We have different wind conditions now but it is the same principal... leaks exposing dirty secrets between Shia and Sunni regional powers.

They are saying that it was Iran who is behind the saudi cables....
 

eLad

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
Shou ye3ni American spy? I am an Anerican citizen and meet with American officials all the time because I chose to be involved in both Lebanese and American politics. Does that make me a spy? Many of you don't realize it but Ali is also an American citizen and before he moved to Lebanon he held an official post in the U.S. in a municipality.

I am friends with Ali and meet with him whenever I happen to be in Lebanon or he visits the U.S. We meet socially as friends and rarely talk politics. I wouldn't know whether he's a spy or not but considering his background and that by virtue of his career he meets with American officials, it's very easy for someone to start such rumors about him and for others (especially foes) to believe them.

There is no evidence against the guy, so we can leave it at that.

P.S. According to Bandar I too, like Ali, am a CIA agent :)
I wouldnt be surprised if your name comes in those cables. Im holding my breath :)
 

J_Raad1450

Well-Known Member
Any speculations about how wiki leaks obtained those documents? Mujtahid is saying more dangerous leaks haven't been published yet.
الجهة التي أوصلت وثائق الخارجية لوكيليكس حجبت عن ويكليكس جزاء منها لأنه لا يخدم قضيتها هذا الجزء لم ولن ينشر وهو أخطر مما نشر التفاصل لاحقا
https://twitter.com/mujtahidd
 

My Moria Moon

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
Haven't we been leaking most of those leaks, in one leaky way or another, under various forum leaks since years and before they were officially WikiLeaked? Maybe we did not have the exakt metric measures of the rape, but didn't we know how severely penetrated many of our za3eems are via saudi riyals?

Ba3den leaks or no leaks, nothing will change, the shameless w bala sharaf money prostitute will not suddenly grow him/herself some honor because wiki urinated out his/her dirty secrets. Those habal we rally behind have deemed their habitat a jungle and think they are privileged to sit on the first row and accordingly grab whatever they can from whoever offers it.

The only good thing about those leaks is the fact those ugly and evil *****cats will think twice and feel some extra pain in their stomach the next time they decide to resell their re-used minds, tongues and souls in souq al sharmata.
 

J_Raad1450

Well-Known Member
For the first time ever, the kingdom find itself in a problem where money cannot solve. I just made a mistake. This is the second time. Yemeni war was the first.

What was the official Saudi response? Ask their citizens not to read or spread the leaks. Very entertaining.

Am I the only one here that believe the U.S. Hands all over this? Time to dump the kingdom of terror? Small steps with huge consequences. Like if you agree.
 

My Moria Moon

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
For the first time ever, the kingdom find itself in a problem where money cannot solve. I just made a mistake. This is the second time. Yemeni war was the first.

What was the official Saudi response? Ask their citizens not to read or spread the leaks. Very entertaining.

Am I the only one here that believe the U.S. Hands all over this? Time to dump the kingdom of terror? Small steps with huge consequences. Like if you agree.

I like, because I wish, although I don't totally agree. 3a teezoun if wiki leaks or shits them out.. They know their petro money still speaks louder than anything else, at least for still some time. But they do sit on a deadly combination nonetheless, money serving an evil doctrine is like begging for a titanic crash; playing with that wahhabi fire of theirs for too long will definitely have consequences, peeing in their beds is the least of them. And those b3eer farts are so dumb they will notice it only when it is too late.
 

J. Abizeid

Well-Known Member
Saudi Arabia tells citizens to ignore latest WikiLeaks release | World news | The Guardian

Saudi Arabia tells citizens to ignore latest WikiLeaks release
61,000 leaked cables give rare insight into kingdom’s habit of buying influence and monitoring dissidents



Saudi Arabia’s King Abdullah, who died in January. Photograph: Hassan Ammar/AP

Saudi Arabia has warned its citizens to ignore thousands of its diplomatic documents leaked by the transparency site WikiLeaks, which give a rare insight into the kingdom’s habit of buying influence and monitoring dissidents.

The 61,000 Saudi cables, the first tranche of 500,000 promised by Julian Assange, the WikiLeaks founder, also show the country’s sharp focus on its strategic rival Iran and the revolution in Egypt, and support for allies and clients in Lebanon, Iraq, Yemen and elsewhere in the Middle East.

Nothing yet published matches embarrassing revelations about the Saudis in WikiLeaks’ 2010 release of US diplomatic documents, which reported King Abdullah calling to “cut off the head of the [Iranian] snake” as well as drink- and drug-fuelled partying by minor royals in Jeddah.

But routine secret correspondence from the foreign ministry in Riyadh and embassies abroad, some from as recently as April this year, catalogues many of the preoccupations of the conservative monarchy, the world’s biggest oil exporter, especially during the turbulent period of the Arab spring from early 2011.

According to one document, Gulf states were prepared to pay $10bn (£6.3bn) to secure the release of the deposed Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak, which appears to support a previous claim about this by a leading Muslim Brotherhood politician.

A 2012 cable reveals concern that Iran was receiving “flirting American messages” that suggested the US did not oppose a peaceful Iranian nuclear programme so long as it had guarantees, including from Russia. Others from that period show Saudi plans for an anti-Iran satellite TV channel to broadcast in Persian from Bahrain, and plans to disrupt Iranian channels.

The cables show Riyadh often seems worried about any advantage for Tehran: one document explains that if an Arab summit conference were held as scheduled in Baghdad in 2012, it would mean “handing Iraq to Iran”. Cables also show efforts to back opponents of Nouri al-Maliki, the then Shia prime minister of Iraq, who was close to Iran.

Correspondence from the embassy in Beirut shows contacts with the Lebanese Forces leader, Samir Geagea, over cash payments to ease financial problems. Geagea had publicly defended Saudi Arabia and opposed president Bashar al-Assad of Syria, and generally shown “readiness to do whatever the kingdom asks of him”, the cables say.

Al-Akhbar, the Beirut newspaper that is publishing the documents with WikiLeaks, is a supporter of Assad and Iran’s Lebanese militia ally Hezbollah. The documents examined so far do not mention Saudi backing for anti-Assad rebels, most likely because these are handled by the country’s intelligence service.

Correspondence from the Saudi embassy in London shows filming of protesters and a discussion of legal action against the Guardian over an article by Saad al-Faqih, an Islamist. An appearance by Faqih on Egypt’s ON TV channel brought a proposal to “find out how to co-opt it”. But the billionaire owner of the station, Naguib Sawiris, did not want to be “opposed to the kingdom’s policies” and he ordered that Faqih never be interviewed again.

“The extent of Egypt’s ruling establishment’s self-prostitution to Saudi money is both embarrassing and unsurprising,” commented the writer Iyad al-Baghdadi, in one of many weekend social media reactions since the documents were released. Ala’a Shehabi, a Bahraini dissident concerned by the Saudi intervention in her country, called the trove a “rare insight into the most opaque regime in the world”.

Toby Matthiesen, a Cambridge University academic, said: “For Saudi experts there is little surprising so far … but the details will hurt a lot of corrupt people.”

The documents include several references to “hostile” media. An undated note describes the influence of journalists sympathetic to the Muslim Brotherhood on the Qatar-owned channel al-Jazeera, which has often fallen foul of the Saudis. The papers also show how in 2010 they purchased hundreds or thousands of subscriptions to publications in Damascus, Abu Dhabi, Beirut, Kuwait, Jordan and Mauritania in order to secure favourable coverage.

Influence and money are recurring themes. Reports from Sana’a state that the proceeds of the sale of 3m barrels of oil given to Yemen in 2012 never reached the country’s treasury. Another document accuses Qatar of paying a Yemeni sheikh to foment rebellion in the army and to prevent the 2012 presidential election of Abd Rabbu Mansour Hadi.

The Sydney Morning Herald found documents with instructions from the Saudi government to its Canberra embassy relating to the payment of large subsidies to prominent Arabic newspapers and media organisations in Australia.

The Sunday Times reported that a document in the cache showed Saudi Arabia was prepared to pay the BBC correspondent Frank Gardner £1m in compensation after he was shot in Riyadh by al-Qaida. Gardner told the newspaper the compensation never materialised.

On Sunday the Saudi foreign ministry spokesman Osama Nugali warned citizens not to “allow enemies of the state to achieve their intentions in regards to exchanging or publishing any documents,” many of which, he said, had been “fabricated in a very obvious manner”.

WikiLeaks did not say where it obtained the documents, but it referred in a press release to Riyadh’s statement in May that it had suffered a breach of its computer networks – an attack later claimed by a group calling itself the Yemen Cyber Army.

The Guardian has not been able to independently verify the authenticity of the documents.
 
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