HealthPedia

Paradosiaka

Paradosiaka

Well-Known Member
Olives




Even though more attention has been sometimes been given to their delicious oil than their whole food delights, olives are one of the world's most widely enjoyed foods. Technically classified as fruits of the Olea europea tree (an amazing tree that typically lives for hundreds of years) we commonly think about olives not as fruit but as a zesty vegetable that can be added are harvested in September but available year round to make a zesty addition to salads, meat and poultry dishes and, of course, pizza.

Olives are too bitter to be eaten right off the tree and must be cured to reduce their intrinsic bitterness. Processing methods vary with the olive variety, region where they are cultivated, and the desired taste, texture and color. Some olives are picked unripe, while others are allowed to fully ripen on the tree. The color of an olive is not necessarily related to its state of maturity. Many olives start off green and turn black when fully ripe. However, some olives start off green and remain green when fully ripe, while others start of black and remain black. In the United States, where most olives come from California, olives are typically green in color, picked in an unripe state, lye-cured, and then exposed to air as a way of triggering oxidation and conversion to a black outer color. Water curing, brine curing, and lye curing are the most common treatment processes for olives, and each of these treatments can affect the color and composition of the olives.

What's New and Beneficial About Olives

Dozens of health-protective nutrients have been identified in olives, and recent studies have taken a very close look at olive varieties, olive processing, and changes that take place in olive nutrients. The overall conclusion from these studies is exciting for anyone who loves olives of all varieties. Greek-style black olives, Spanish-style green olives, Kalamata-style olives, and many different methods of olive preparation provide us with valuable amounts of many different antioxidant and anti-inflammatory nutrients. While there are trade-offs that occur during olive ripening and olive curing—for example, decreased oleuropein with advanced stages of ripening yet increased amounts of anthocyanins—it's impossible to rule out any single type of olive as being unworthy of consideration as a uniquely health-supportive food, particularly in terms of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits.
Hydroxytyrosol, an olive phytonutrient that has long been linked to cancer prevention, is now regarded as having the potential to help us prevent bone loss as well. Several recent laboratory animal studies have found increased depositing of calcium in bone and decreased loss of total bone mass following consumption of this olive phytonutrient (as well as oleuropein, another key phytonutrient found in olives). These findings are fascinating, since consumption of a Mediterranean Diet has long been associated with decreased risk of osteoporosis, and olives often find themselves on center stage in Mediterranean Diet studies.
In traditional herbal medicine practices, preparations from olives and olive leaves have often been used in treatment of inflammatory problems, including allergy-related inflammation. New research may help explain how olives work to provide us with anti-inflammatory benefits, especially during circumstances involving allergy. Olive extracts have now been shown to function as anti-histamines at a cellular level. By blocking special histamine receptors (called H1 receptors), unique components in olive extracts may help to lessen a cell's histamine response. Because histamine is a molecule that can get overproduced in allergy-related conditions and can be a key player in the inflammatory process, it's likely that the anti-inflammatory benefits we get from olives involve this anti-histamine pathway. It's also possible that olives may have a special role to play as part of an overall anti-allergenic diet.
 
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  • Paradosiaka

    Paradosiaka

    Well-Known Member
    Kiwi



    Those who love fruit salads will be well aware of the fruit Kiwi because of the exotic and tropical flair that it adds to your salads. It is an exotic fruit that has a wonderful and distinct flavor. But a lot of people are not aware of this fruit because it is produced in a very few countries and thus these people are missing out on a lot!

    Prevents asthma and other respiratory diseases: Studies in Italy performed on 18,000 6-7 year old children have demonstrated health benefits to the respiratory tract. The study found that children eating the 5-7 servings of citrus and kiwifruit per week had 44 percent less incidence of wheezing compared to children eating less than once a week. Nigh time cough was reduced by 27 percent, shortness of breath by 32 percent, runny nose by 28 percent, severe wheeze by 41 percent, and chronic cough by 25 percent. This is because of the high vitamin C content of the fruit.

    Fights cardiovascular diseases: Eating kiwi fruit every morning has the same effect as aspirin for heart health (reduced blood clotting), but without the side effects such as inflammation and bleeding in the intestinal tract. According to a study conducted in University of Oslo, Norway, people who ate 2 to 3 kiwi fruit per day for 28 days reduced their platelet aggregation response (potential for blood clot formation) by 18 percent and lowered their blood triglycerides by 15 percent. This prevents a build up of deposits and plaques in the arterial walls, consequently, guarding against cardiovascular diseases.

    Anti cancer: Kiwi contains a variety of flavonoids and carotenoids, which have demonstrated antioxidant activity. These phytonutrients are responsible for protecting your DNA from oxygen-related damage. By preventing DNA from being damaged, cancer growth is inhibited and prevented.

    Digestive health: Kiwis are a very good source of dietary fiber. Fiber helps keep your digestive health in check and is good for binding and removing toxins from the colon, which is helpful for preventing colon cancer. Fiber also acts to prevent constipation and other gastro-intestinal issues.

    Protects your eyes: Kiwi is a good source of lutein and zeaxanthin, natural chemicals found in the human eye. Lutein helps to filter out damaging blue light, which helps prevent age-related macular degeneration and the development of glaucoma and cataracts. Zeaxanthin works hand in hand with lutein, contributing primarily to eye health. A study published in the June 2004 issue of the Archives of Opthamology indicates that eating 3 or more servings of fruit (including kiwi) per day may lower your risk of age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), which is the primary cause of vision loss in older adults.

    Manage blood pressure: It is a very rich source of healthy electrolyte potassium. Potassium plays a major role in body cells by keeping the body fluids and electrolyte in balance, which help control heart rate and blood pressure by countering effects of sodium.

    Good for skin: Kiwi is a good source of vitamin E, an antioxidant that can help against potential skin degeneration and work wonders for the health of the skin.

    Boosts immunity: Due to its extremely high vitamin C content and its complement of antioxidant compounds, kiwi has proven to be an immune booster.

    Fights male impotency: It contains the amino acid arginine, a well-known vasodilator that has been used to treat impotence in men.

    Supports healthy birth: It has four peaches' worth of folate, which is essential for women before and during pregnancy. Folate helps to develop the blood cells for the baby in the womb.
     
    Paradosiaka

    Paradosiaka

    Well-Known Member
    Water






    Americans seem to carry bottled water everywhere they go these days. In fact, it has become the second most popular drink (behind soft drinks). But water lovers got a jolt recently when we heard that a new report had found that the benefits of drinking water may have been oversold. Apparently, the old suggestion to drink eight glasses a day was nothing more than a guideline, not based on scientific evidence.

    But don't put your water bottle or glass down just yet. While we may not need eight glasses, there are plenty of reasons to drink water. In fact, drinking water (either plain or in the form of other fluids or foods) is essential to your health.

    "Think of water as a nutrient your body needs that is present in liquids, plain water, and foods. All of these are essential daily to replace the large amounts of water lost each day," says Joan Koelemay, RD, dietitian for the Beverage Institute, an industry group.

    Kaiser Permanente nephrologist Steven Guest, MD, agrees: "Fluid losses occur continuously, from skin evaporation, breathing, urine, and stool, and these losses must be replaced daily for good health," he says.

    When your water intake does not equal your output, you can become dehydrated. Fluid losses are accentuated in warmer climates, during strenuous exercise, in high altitudes, and in older adults, whose sense of thirst may not be as sharp.

    Continue reading below...
    Here are six reasons to make sure you're drinking enough water or other fluids every day:

    1. Drinking Water Helps Maintain the Balance of Body Fluids. Your body is composed of about 60% water. The functions of these bodily fluids include digestion, absorption, circulation, creation of saliva, transportation of nutrients, and maintenance of body temperature.

    "Through the posterior pituitary gland, your brain communicates with your kidneys and tells it how much water to excrete as urine or hold onto for reserves," says Guest, who is also an adjunct professor of medicine at Stanford University.

    When you're low on fluids, the brain triggers the body's thirst mechanism. And unless you are taking medications that make you thirsty, Guest says, you should listen to those cues and get yourself a drink of water, juice, milk, coffee -- anything but alcohol.

    "Alcohol interferes with the brain and kidney communication and causes excess excretion of fluids which can then lead to dehydration," he says.

    2. Water Can Help Control Calories. For years, dieters have been drinking lots of water as a weight loss strategy. While water doesn't have any magical effect on weight loss, substituting it for higher calorie beverages can certainly help.

    "What works with weight loss is if you choose water or a non-caloric beverage over a caloric beverage and/or eat a diet higher in water-rich foods that are healthier, more filling, and help you trim calorie intake," says Penn State researcher Barbara Rolls, PhD, author of The Volumetrics Weight Control Plan.

    Food with high water content tends to look larger, its higher volume requires more chewing, and it is absorbed more slowly by the body, which helps you feel full. Water-rich foods include fruits, vegetables, broth-based soups, oatmeal, and beans.

    3. Water Helps Energize Muscles. Cells that don't maintain their balance of fluids and electrolytes shrivel, which can result in muscle fatigue. "When muscle cells don't have adequate fluids, they don't work as well and performance can suffer," says Guest.

    Drinking enough fluids is important when exercising. Follow the American College of Sports Medicine guidelines for fluid intake before and during physical activity. These guidelines recommend that people drink about 17 ounces of fluid about two hours before exercise. During exercise, they recommend that people start drinking fluids early, and drink them at regular intervals to replace fluids lost by sweating.

    4. Water Helps Keep Skin Looking Good. Your skin contains plenty of water, and functions as a protective barrier to prevent excess fluid loss. But don't expect over-hydration to erase wrinkles or fine lines, says Atlanta dermatologist Kenneth Ellner, MD.

    "Dehydration makes your skin look more dry and wrinkled, which can be improved with proper hydration," he says. "But once you are adequately hydrated, the kidneys take over and excrete excess fluids."

    Continue reading below...
    You can also help "lock" moisture into your skin by using moisturizer, which creates a physical barrier to keep moisture in.

    5. Water Helps Your Kidneys. Body fluids transport waste products in and out of cells. The main toxin in the body is blood urea nitrogen, a water-soluble waste that is able to pass through the kidneys to be excreted in the urine, explains Guest. "Your kidneys do an amazing job of cleansing and ridding your body of toxins as long as your intake of fluids is adequate," he says.

    When you're getting enough fluids, urine flows freely, is light in color and free of odor. When your body is not getting enough fluids, urine concentration, color, and odor increases because the kidneys trap extra fluid for bodily functions.

    If you chronically drink too little, you may be at higher risk for kidney stones, especially in warm climates, Guest warns.

    6. Water Helps Maintain Normal Bowel Function. Adequate hydration keeps things flowing along your gastrointestinal tract and prevents constipation. When you don't get enough fluid, the colon pulls water from stools to maintain hydration -- and the result is constipation.

    "Adequate fluid and fiber is the perfect combination, because the fluid pumps up the fiber and acts like a broom to keep your bowel functioning properly," says Koelemay.


    5 Tips to Help You Drink More
    If you think you need to be drinking more, here are some tips to increase your fluid intake and reap the benefits of water:

    1.Have a beverage with every snack and meal.
    2.Choose beverages you enjoy; you're likely to drink more liquids if you like the way they taste.
    3.Eat more fruits and vegetables. Their high water content will add to your hydration. About 20% of our fluid intake comes from foods.
    4.Keep a bottle of water with you in your car, at your desk, or in your bag.
    5.Choose beverages that meet your individual needs. If you're watching calories, go for non-caloric beverages or water.
     
    EuroMode

    EuroMode

    Active Member
    The 12 Best Foods to Control Diabetes

    We all know that maintaining a healthy diet is vital in terms of diabetes prevention and treatment. Generally, the advice given to diabetics is relevant to the general population as well: consume adequate vegetables, fruits, legumes, whole grains, low-fat dairy products, poultry and fish, and less industrial sweets and foods high in fat and salt.

    It is known that patients who use professional advice and expert dieticians and nutritional supervision have a much better chance to maintain balanced levels of sugar, and avoid the complications of the disease. Diabetics should also keep meals at regular times throughout the day to avoid sharp rises in blood sugar levels.

    So what are the best foods to control diabetes and add to the menu? There are 6 foods that can help balance blood sugar in your body. These are olive oil, cinnamon, green tea, pulses, green vegetables and oats. These common foods that are already in our kitchen help maintaining adequate blood sugar and prevent diabetes complications:

    1. Olive oil

    Oil lacks carbohydrates, and therefore does not raise blood sugar levels. In addition, it slows the absorption of foods eaten along with the oil. Olive oil is rich Omega 9 and Omega 3 which help maintain the flexibility of blood vessels, allowing good blood flow. Also oil does not increase insulin levels, thus reducing the non-insulin tolerance that exists in many people and causes an increase in blood sugar levels. Find here more information about the great health benefits of olive oil.

    2. Cinnamon

    Many studies show that consumption of one teaspoon cinnamon (5 mg) to three teaspoons a day has a positive effect on reducing blood glucose levels. It was found that the cinnamon can make your cells more sensitive to insulin. Thus, the cells convert sugar into energy more efficiently and control the amount of sugar level in the blood. Diabetics who received cinnamon extract daily for 40 days experienced lower levels of blood sugar after eating, as well as substantial improvements to the heart health. Read here more about how to use cinnamon as a medicine.

    3. Green tea


    Green tea contains the antioxidant EGCG, which helps to maintain the flexibility of blood vessels and stabilizing blood glucose levels. A recent study conducted at the University of Pennsylvania found that this element reduces blood sugar levels and prevents its sharp rise after a meal consisting mainly carbohydrates. Read here more about the amazing health benefits of green tea.

    4. Pulses

    Legumes such as lentils, peas, beans and chickpeas are low in fat and calories and also rich in fiber and protein. Dietary fiber slows the rate of sugar absorption into the blood and reduces the glycemic load. They are a great addition to soups, salads and a variety of other dishes.

    5. Green vegetables

    According to a study published in the British Medical Journal fresh green leaves vegetables such as lettuce, cabbage, spinach, Swiss chard and parsley, and other green vegetables (fresh, steamed or frozen) such as celery, cucumber, cauliflower, green beans and kohlrabi contain carbohydrates that release hormones in the gut that reduce appetite. In addition, the researchers found that these vegetables improves insulin sensitivity and thus better regulate blood glucose levels. Eating vegetables like asparagus, garlic and Jerusalem artichoke can help in cases of diabetes and obesity, and reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes because vegetables are rich in magnesium and are known as effective antioxidants.

    6. Oatmeal

    Oats contain a high percentage of fiber, B vitamins (especially B1), vitamin E and antioxidants. The large amount of fiber causes a slower absorption of glucose, and combining antioxidants makes the oatmeal recommended food to stabilize blood sugar levels. Click here to find easy and delicious porridge recipes with oatmeal.

    7. Red Apples

    A recent study conducted in Finland found that men who ate the greatest number of apples (and other foods rich in quercetin) had 20% less deaths related to diabetes or heart complications. Other good sources of quercetin are red grapes, tomatoes, onions, green vegetables and berries. You can find easy and nutritious berry recipes in my e-book The Healing The Healing Berry Guide. This e-book will teach you how to transform your health with berries, and is a must for berry lovers.

    8. Vitamin C rich foods

    Studies show that people with diabetes have lower levels of vitamin C in their body, so rich foods in vitamin C such as berries, citrus fruits, peppers, dark green leafy vegetables, kiwifruit, tomatoes, etc are loaded with antioxidants and are an excellent choice.

    9. Cold-water fish

    Those who suffer from diabetes are twice more likely to suffer also from heart disease. A diet rich in omega-3 fatty acids found in cold water fish, can help to lower “bad “cholesterol and raise your “good” cholesterol. Seafood is a great source for omega 3, such as: halibut, herring, mackerel, oysters, salmon, sardines, trout, tuna and cod. Vegetables, especially green leafy ones, such as: kale, parsley, mint, Brussle sprouts, spinach and watercress, are rich in ALA, one form of omega-3 fatty acids (although ALA isn’t as powerful as the other omega 3 fatty acids, DHA and EPA). Ground flaxseed is also a good source of omega 3. Read here more about the fantastic health benefits of omega 3.

    10 . Dark Chocolate

    Researchers from Tufts University in Massachusetts found that dark chocolate improves cell sensitivity to insulin and significantly improves the chances of avoiding diabetes. In addition, dark chocolate lowers blood pressure and the amount of “bad” cholesterol in the body, and strengthens the blood vessels.

    11 . Grass fed beef

    There are other things in beef other than protein, iron and vitamin B. There is an element which is part of the beef fat which is called CLA (conjugated linoleic acid). The most abundant source of CLA is beef from grass-fed cows. Experiments have shown that CLA works to correct improper utilization of blood sugar and helps fight cancer and heart disease. In a recent study in Norway scientists have added a few grams of CLA to the daily diet of 180 people. They reported that they lost 9% of their body weight in one year. Make sure that the beed is processed as little as possible, as it contains more CLA. Other food sources of CLA in smaller amounts include milk and eggs.

    12. Apple Cider vinegar (ACV)

    According to webMD website, the effect of ACV on blood sugar levels is one of the best researched and the most promising. Several studies have found that vinegar may help lower glucose levels. For example, a small 2007 study with type 2 diabetes found that taking two tablespoons of apple cider vinegar before bed lowered glucose levels in the morning by 4%-6%.
     
    Paradosiaka

    Paradosiaka

    Well-Known Member
    cup of coffee in the morning may pack more than just an energy boost.





    More and more research is emerging to suggest that there may be several health benefits associated with drinking this dark black beverage, from helping prevent diabetes to lowering the risk of liver disease.

    The consumption of coffee goes back centuries.

    In 17th century England the popularity of the drink gave rise to a number of coffee houses which were dubbed 'penny universities', because with one penny a person could buy a cup of coffee and have intellectually stimulating conversations with other people.1

    Nowadays, with over 400 billion cups consumed every year, coffee is one of the world's most popular drinks. But what makes it special?

    This MNT Knowledge Center feature is part of a collection of articles on the health benefits of popular foods. It provides a nutritional breakdown of coffee, details of the potential health benefits associated with its consumption, and any possible risks you should be aware of.

    Regular black coffee (without milk or cream) has a very low calorie count. A typical cup of black coffee only contains around 2 calories.

    However, if you add sugar and milk, the calorie count can shoot up.

    Coffee is the number one source of antioxidants in the U.S., according to researchers at the University of Scranton.

    Joe Vinson, Ph.D., lead author of the study, said that "Americans get more of their antioxidants from coffee than any other dietary source. Nothing else comes close."2

    The authors of the study emphasize moderation, stating that only one or two cups a day appear to be beneficial.

    Caffeinated and decaffeinated versions provided nearly the same levels of antioxidants.

    Health benefits of coffee
    The potential health benefits associated with drinking coffee include: protecting against type 2 diabetes, Parkinson's disease, liver disease, liver cancer, and promoting a healthy heart.3

    Coffee may protect against type 2 diabetes

    Coffee may be protective against type 2 diabetes. Researchers at UCLA identified that drinking coffee increases plasma levels of the protein sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG). SHBG controls the biological activity of the body's sex hormones (testosterone and estrogen) which play a role in the development of type 2 diabetes.4

    Dr. Simin Liu, one of the authors of the study, said that an "inverse association" exists between coffee consumption and risk for type 2 diabetes.

    Increased coffee consumption may reduce risk of type 2 diabetes - the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers gathered data from three studies. In these studies, the diets of the participants were evaluated using questionnaires every 4 years, with participants who reported having type 2 diabetes filling out additional questionnaires. In total, 7,269 study participants had type 2 diabetes.

    The researchers found that the participants who increased their coffee intake by more than one cup a day (on average, an increase of 1.69 cups per day) over a 4-year period had an 11% lower type 2 diabetes risk over the subsequent 4 years, compared with people who did not change their intake.

    Coffee may help prevent Parkinson's disease

    Researchers in the U.S. carried out a study that assessed the link between coffee consumption and Parkinson's disease risk. The authors of the study concluded that "higher coffee and caffeine intake is associated with a significantly lower incidence of Parkinson's disease".5

    In addition, caffeine in coffee may help control movement in people suffering from Parkinson's, according to a study conducted at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI MUHC) that was published in the journal Neurology.6

    Coffee may lower the risk of liver cancer

    Italian researchers found that coffee consumption lowers the risk of liver cancer by about 40%. In addition, some of the results suggest that if you drink three cups a day, the risks are reduced by more than 50%.7

    The lead author of the study, Dr. Carlo La Vecchia, from Milan's Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, said "our research confirms past claims that coffee is good for your health and particularly the liver."

    Coffee may help prevent liver disease

    Regular consumption of coffee is linked to a reduced risk of primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), a rare autoimmune disease of the bile ducts in the liver.8

    In addition, coffee consumption can lower the incidence of cirrhosis of the liver for alcohol drinkers by 22%, according to a study at the Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program, California, USA.

    The authors of the study concluded that the results "support the hypothesis that there is an ingredient in coffee that protects against cirrhosis, especially alcoholic cirrhosis."9

    Research published in the journal Hepatology in April 2014, suggests that drinking coffee is linked to a decreased liver cirrhosis death risk. The researchers suggest that drinking two or more cups of coffee every day can reduce the risk of death from liver cirrhosis by 66%.16

    Coffee may be good for the heart

    Researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and Harvard School of Public Health, concluded that drinking coffee in moderation protects against heart failure. They defined 'in moderation' as 2 European cups (equivalent to two 8-ounce American servings) per day.10

    People who drank four European cups on a daily basis had an 11% lower risk of heart failure, compared to those who did not.

    The authors stressed that their results "did show a possible benefit, but like with so many other things we consume, it really depends on how much coffee you drink."

    Coffee may reduce stroke risk. A study monitored coffee consumption of 83,269 Japanese adults aged 45 to 74 years and found that people who drank coffee on a daily basis were at a 20 percent lower risk of stroke compared to those who did not drink it often.11

    High coffee intake may help against prostate cancer. According to a study published in the journal Cancer Causes and Control, men who drank four or more cups of coffee a day had 59% reduced risk of prostate cancer recurrence and/or progression than those whose coffee consumption was just one cup a week or less.12
    Can coffee protect our eyesight?. Research published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry found that drinking coffee may protect against deteriorating eyesight and even blindness.

    Risks

    Drinking too much coffee can result in some very unpleasant adverse effects. According to a study by researchers at the University of Oklahoma, "caffeine can cause anxiety symptoms in normal individuals, especially in vulnerable patients, like those with pre-existing anxiety disorders."13

    In addition, "caffeine use is also associated with symptoms of depression due to either a self-medication theory, or a theory that caffeine itself causes changes in mood."

    Women who plan on becoming pregnant should be cautious. Researchers from the University of Nevada School of Medicine reported in the British Journal of Pharmacology that regular coffee may reduce a woman's chances of becoming pregnant.
     
    Paradosiaka

    Paradosiaka

    Well-Known Member
    Green Tea





    Green tea has been used as a medicine for thousands of years, originating in China but widely used throughout Asia this beverage has a multitude of uses from lowering blood pressure to preventing cancer. The reason that green tea has more health benefits attached to it than black tea is (apparently) due to the processing. Black tea is processed in a way that allows for fermentation whereas green tea’s processing avoids the fermentation process. As a result, green tea retains maximum amount of antioxidants and poly-phenols the substances that give green tea its many benefits.

    Here’s a list of some of its amazing benefits — benefits that you may not have been aware of. Some of these benefits are still being debated, so please do your own research if you want to use green tea for medicinal purposes.

    1- Weight Loss. Green tea increases the metabolism. The polyphenol found in green tea works to intensify levels of fat oxidation and the rate at which your body turns food into calories.

    2- Diabetes. Green tea apparently helps regulate glucose levels slowing the rise of blood sugar after eating. This can prevent high insulin spikes and resulting fat storage.

    3- Heart Disease. Scientists think, green tea works on the lining of blood vessels, helping keep them stay relaxed and better able to withstand changes in blood pressure. It may also protect against the formation of clots, which are the primary cause of heart attacks.

    4- Esophageal Cancer. It can reduce the risk of esophageal cancer, but it is also widely thought to kill cancer cells in general without damaging the healthy tissue around them.

    5-Cholesterol. Green tea reduces bad cholesterol in the blood and improves the ratio of good cholesterol to bad cholesterol.

    6- Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. It is said to delay the deterioration caused by Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. Studies carried out on mice showed that green tea protected brain cells from dying and restored damaged brain cells.

    7- Tooth Decay. Studies suggests that the chemical antioxidant “catechin” in tea can destroy bacteria and viruses that cause throat infections, dental caries and other dental conditions

    8- Blood Pressure. Regular consumption of green tea is thought to reduce the risk of high blood pressure.

    9-Depression. Theanine is an amino acid naturally found in tea leaves. It is this substance that is thought to provide a relaxing and tranquilizing effect and be a great benefit to tea drinkers
    .
    10-Anti-viral and Anti-bacterial. Tea catechins are strong antibacterial and antiviral agents which make them effective for treating everything from influenza to cancer. In some studies green tea has been shown to inhibit the spread of many diseases.

    11- Skincare. Green tea can apparently also help with wrinkles and the signs of aging, This is because of their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. Both animal and human studies have demonstrated that green tea applied topically can reduce sun damage.

    How Much?
    These are some of the many benefits but the reality is one cup of tea a day will not give you all the abundant gains. The jury is out on how many cups are necessary; some say as little as two cups a day while others five cups — and more still say you can drink up to ten cups a day. If you are thinking of going down this route, you may want to consider taking a green tea supplement instead (it would keep you out of the bathroom).

    Another thing to point out is that there is caffeine in green tea — so if you are sensitive to caffeine then one cup should be your limit. Green tea also contains tannins (which can decrease the absorption of iron and folic acid), so if you are pregnant or trying to conceive then green tea may not be ideal for you. You can try mixing green tea with other healthy ingredients such as ginger.
     
    Isabella

    Isabella

    The queen of "Bazella"
    Orange Room Supporter
    Apple Cider Vinegar:



    For over a thousand years, vinegar has been used for a multitude of reasons; as healing elixir for numerous ailment like fever, cough and colds, as antibiotic, natural detox cleansing agent, energizing drink, as preservative and condiment, antiseptic-disinfectant in cleansing wounds and instruments, for polishing armors, and even as a deodorant.

    There are different types of vinegar: balsamic, cane, cider, rice, wine vinegar, to name a few. All have acetic acid as their main ingredient which gives its characteristic sour taste. All are basically used as a cooking ingredient, each having its unique composition, characteristics and other uses. What separates apple cider vinegar from the rest?

    Apple cider vinegar is made from cider or apple must (Apfelmost) that has undergone fermentation, wherein bacteria and yeast convert sugar to alcohol and finally to acetic acid. It has a pale to amber color with a cloudy, cobweb-like substance, called ‘mother of vinegar' located at the bottom of the bottle. This mother is reported to contain beneficial enzymes and bacteria.

    health benefits of apple cider vinegar
    Apple cider vinegar is rich in minerals, like potassium, sodium, chloride, phosphorus, calcium, and magnesium, and trace minerals, like, copper, fluorine, as well as vitamins A, B1, B2, B6, C, and E, bioflavonoids, and pectin.

    Health Benefits of Apple Cider Vinegar
    The saying, ‘an apple a day keeps the doctor away' is truly exemplified by the use of apple cider vinegar. Testaments of its use and scientific studies prove its many and varied healing properties. Apple cider vinegar has been reported to:

    relieve sore throat, colds, and sinus infection
    lower high cholesterol levels
    help clear skin conditions and blemishes, like acne and age spots
    help eliminate toxins
    prevent allergies
    increase strength and improve stamina
    Strengthen the immune system
    Improve metabolism which helps reducing weight
    Promote digestion and help promote bowel movement
    Relieve joint pain and stiffness
    Treat bladder infection
    Uses of Apple Cider Vinegar
    Presently, apple cider is used in food as salad dressing and in making pickles. It is a popularly used as a household product, for disinfecting and cleaning windows, kitchen surfaces, bathroom tiles, and glasses, for eliminating flies, and on pets to control fleas. But more importantly are its myriad uses on health. Apple cider vinegar is known to be used in the following:

    Weight loss: This cider has been used in traditionally as a weight loss agent and studies have proven that indeed, it does! A study conducted in 2006 obese Japanese reported a modest decrease in weight and decrease in appetite with intake of 30 ml of apple cider vinegar leading to the conclusion that it might reduce obesity.

    Bad breath: Vinegar from apple cider can be used to relieve bad breath. Mix 15 ml of apple cider in one cup of water then gargle for ten seconds.

    Body odor: To use as a deodorant, wipe the armpit with a cotton ball dipped in apple cider vinegar each morning. For foot odor, use ½ cup of apple cider vinegar and mix in a pan of warm water and soak the feet for about 15 minutes once a week.
    WTF??

    Skin Problems and Infections
    Acne: Apple cider kills bacteria, helps balance skin pH, and absorbs excessive oil from our skin. Use one part vinegar in 3-4 parts water. Apply to the skin using cotton swab and leave for ten minutes then rinse. Use three times a day. For severe cases of acne, leave on the skin overnight.

    Age spots: Blend and drain an onion in a bowl, and mix with an equal amount of apple cider. Apply with a cotton swab dipped in the mixture over the spots. Or, drink a mixture of a few drops of apple cider vinegar in a glass of water and add honey as sweetener.

    Cellulite: Topical application: Mix 3 parts apple cider vinegar with one part of your favorite massage oil and gently massage the affected skin two times a day. Oral preparation: Mix 2 tablespoons of apple cider vinegar into a glass of water. Add honey as sweetener. Drink every morning.

    Yeast infection: Apple cider has antiseptic properties that help in the treatment of fungal infections, like Candidiasis. Regimens are:

    Add 1 ½ cups apple cider into a bathtub filled with lukewarm water and then soak in it for about 20 minutes. This is done once a day for 3 days.
    After 3 days of soaking, make a mixture consisting of 1 ½ cups of water and 2 tablespoons of apple cider vinegar. This time use as a vaginal douche two times a day for 5 days.
    After a few days of douching, start to drink a glass of water mixed with 1 teaspoon of apple cider vinegar once a day. This can help prevent the occurrence of yeast infections.
    Stomach Problems
    Constipation: Apple cider aids the body in promoting bowel movement. This action is due to pectin, a water-soluble fiber that adds bulk to stools and therefore promotes bowel movement. For an effective treatment of constipation, add 2 tablespoons of apple cider into a glass of water, and drink this mixture three times a day. Mix with apple juice or grape juice to make it more palatable.

    Diarrhea: The pectin content in apple cider makes it a great remedy for diarrhea, since it acts to coat the inflamed colon lining. It can be used by simply adding 2 tablespoons of the vinegar to some water in a large glass, which can be taken three times a day while symptoms occur.

    Diabetes: The most studied of the many uses of apple cider vinegar. Studies have reported apple cider vinegar to decrease blood glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes. One study in 2004 reported apple cider to have similar activity as metformin or acarbose, both anti-diabetic drugs.

    http://www.md-health.com/Health-Benefits-Of-Apple-Cider-Vinegar.html
     
    Paradosiaka

    Paradosiaka

    Well-Known Member
    Bananas:



    You'll never look at a banana the same way again after discovering the many health benefits and reasons to add them to your diet. Bananas combat depression, make you smarter, cure hangovers, relieve morning sickness, protect against kidney cancer, diabetes, osteoporosis and blindness. They can cure the itch of a mosquito bite and put a great shine on your shoes.

    1. Bananas help overcome depression due to high levels of tryptophan, which is converted into serotonin -- the happy-mood brain neurotransmitter.
    2. Eat two bananas before a strenuous workout to pack an energy punch and sustain your blood sugar.
    3. Protect against muscle cramps during workouts and nighttime leg cramps by eating a banana.
    4. Counteract calcium loss during urination and build strong bones by supplementing with a banana.
    5. Improve your mood and reduce PMS symptoms by eating a banana, which regulates blood sugar and produces stress-relieving relaxation.
    6. Bananas reduce swelling, protect against type II diabetes, aid weight loss, strengthen the nervous system, and help with the production of white blood cells, all due to high levels of vitamin B-6.
    7. Strengthen your blood and relieve anemia with the added iron from bananas.
    8. High in potassium and low in salt, bananas are officially recognized by the FDA as being able to lower blood pressure and protect against heart attack and stroke
    .

    Eating Bananas Aids Digestion

    1. Rich in pectin, bananas aid digestion and gently chelate toxins and heavy metals from the body.
    2. Bananas act as a prebiotic, stimulating the growth of friendly bacteria in the bowel. They also produce digestive enzymes to assist in absorbing nutrients.
    3. Constipated? High fiber in bananas can help normalize bowel motility.
    4. Got the runs? Bananas are soothing to the digestive tract and help restore lost electrolytes after diarrhoea.
    5. Bananas are a natural antacid, providing relief from acid reflux, heartburn and GERD.
    6. Bananas are the only raw fruit that can be consumed without distress to relieve stomach ulcers by coating the lining of the stomach against corrosive acids.


    Natural Cures From A Simple Banana

    1. Eating bananas will help prevent kidney cancer, protects the eyes against macular degeneration and builds strong bones by increasing calcium absorption.
    2. Bananas make you smarter and help with learning by making you more alert. Eat a banana before an exam to benefit from the high levels of potassium.
    3. Bananas are high in antioxidants, providing free radicals and protection from chronic disease.
    4. Eating a banana between meals helps stabilize blood sugar and reduce nausea from morning sickness.
    5. Rub a bug bite or hives with the inside of the banana peel to relieve itching and irritation.
    6. Control blood sugar and avoid binging between meals by eating a banana.
    7. Eating a banana can lower the body temperature and cool you during a fever or on a hot day.
    8. The natural mood-enhancer tryptophan, helps to relieve Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD).
    9. Quitting smoking? Bananas contain high levels of B-vitamins as well as potassium and magnesium to speed recovery from the effects of withdrawal.
    10. Remove a wart by placing the inside of a piece of banana peel against the wart and taping it in place.
    11. Rub the inside of a banana peel on your leather shoes or handbag and polish with a dry cloth for a quick shine.
     
    Paradosiaka

    Paradosiaka

    Well-Known Member
    Milk




    Milk is an important part of our diet. We begin drinking it when we are young, but our intake decreases as we get older. Some people shy away from it because they fear that it will add too much fat to their diet. Others leave it out because they believe that they no longer need it. You are never too old to reap the rewards of drinking milk. It is a great source of vitamins and nutrients, and it has several health benefits, such as:

    1. Glowing Skin

    Cleopatra took milk baths to help her skin stay soft, supple and glowing. You can do the same, or you can drink a few glasses of whole milk each day to get its benefits. Milk has several nutrients which help skin look its best. It has lactic acid which can act as an exfoliant and enzymes to help smooth skin. It also has amino acids that help keep skin moisturized. Milk can help prevent damage from environmental toxins because it has antioxidants. However, if you have a sensitivity to milk or dairy products, milk can actually aggravate your skin.

    2. Healthy Bones and Teeth

    Milk is a great source of calcium, which is essential for healthy bones. Not only do young children need it while their bones are growing, but adults need it to keep their bones strong and to prevent osteoporosis. Milk is also great for strong teeth, and it helps prevent tooth decay and cavities. In order for the calcium to be absorbed by the body, vitamin D must be present. If you have a vitamin D deficiency, buy milk that is fortified with extra vitamin D to ensure that your body absorbs the calcium.

    3. Muscles

    Milk contains protein, which helps to rebuild muscles. Drink a glass of milk after you exercise to give your body what it needs to recover. It will help to keep soreness at bay while replenishing fluids that you lost during your workout.

    4. Weight Loss

    Studies show that women who drink low-fat or skim milk lose more weight than those who exclude milk from their diet. It is a great appetizer and it makes a healthy snack. Add a glass to your dinner, or drink a glass while eating a piece of fruit.

    5. Less Stress

    Milk is a great way to de-stress at the end of the day. A glass of warm milk will help to relax tense muscles and soothe frayed nerves. Milk has also been proven to reduce symptoms of PMS and boost energy. The next time you are feeling frazzled, try drinking a glass of milk while you soak in a bubble bath.

    6. Healthy Body

    Milk has properties that lower high blood pressure and risk of strokes. It reduces the liver’s production of cholesterol, and it can act as an antacid. Vitamins A and B in milk can help build good eyesight. Milk has also been show to help lower risk of certain cancers.

    There are several varieties of milk on the market, such as whole, 2%, low-fat and fat free. If you are concerned about the growth hormones used in milk, choose to go the organic route. With all of the types of milk available, you should be able to find something that fits your diet and nutritional needs.
     
    Paradosiaka

    Paradosiaka

    Well-Known Member
    Tips for Reaping the Benefits of Whole Grains




    Eating more whole grains is an easy way to add a layer of "health insurance" to your life. Whole grains are packed with nutrients including protein, fiber, B vitamins, antioxidants, and trace minerals (iron, zinc, copper, and magnesium). A diet rich in whole grains has been shown to reduce the risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes, obesity, and some forms of cancer. Whole-grain diets also improve bowel health by helping to maintain regular bowel movements and promote growth of healthy bacteria in the colon.

    Yet only 10% of Americans consume the recommended minimum of three servings a day.

    Why? For one thing, it's not always easy to tell just which foods are whole grain. Scan the bread, cereal or snack aisle, and virtually every package touts its whole-grain goodness. But not all of them actually are whole grain. Terms like "multigrain," "100% wheat," "organic," "pumpernickel," "bran," and "stone ground" may sound healthy, but none actually indicates the product is whole grain.

    Further, many Americans have the perception that whole grains just don't taste good, or that it's difficult to work them into their daily diets.

    To help you start reaping the benefits of a diet rich in whole grains, WebMD got the skinny on how to tell which foods are made of whole grains, along with suggestions on how to fit the recommended servings into your healthy eating plan.


    Know Your Whole Grains

    A whole grain contains all edible parts of the grain, including the bran, germ, and endosperm. The whole grain may be used intact or recombined, as long as all components are present in natural proportions. To recognize whole grains, keep this list handy when you go to the grocery store and choose any of the following grains:

    • Whole-grain corn
    • Whole oats/oatmeal
    • Popcorn
    • Brown rice
    • Whole rye
    • Whole-grain barley
    • Wild rice
    • Buckwheat
    • Triticale
    • Bulgur (cracked wheat)
    • Millet
    • Quinoa
    • Sorghum
    • 100% whole wheat flour

    But what about when you're buying processed products, such as a loaf of bread? You probably know to avoid products made of "refined" wheat. But did you know that some manufacturers strip the outer layer of bran off the whole kernel of wheat, use the refined wheat flour, add in molasses to color it brown, and call it "100% wheat" bread? That's true -- but it is not a whole grain.

    That's why it's important to check the ingredient list for the word "whole" preceding the grain (such as "whole wheat flour"). Ideally, the whole grain will be the first ingredient in the list, indicating that the product contains more whole grain than any other ingredient.

    One way to find whole grains is to look for the FDA-approved health claim that reads, "Diets rich in whole grain foods and other plant foods and low in total fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol may reduce the risk of heart disease and some cancers." This is found on whole-grain products that contain at least 51% whole grain ingredients (by weight) and are also low in fat.

    Know Your Whole Grains continued...

    Another aid to find whole-grain products is to look for the Whole Grain Council's whole-grain stamp, which shows how many grams of whole grains are in each serving. If all of the grain is whole grain, the stamp also displays a "100%" banner.

    The amount of grains you need daily varies based on your age, sex, and physical activity level. In general, adults need between 5 to 8 ounce equivalents of grains each day, and at least half are recommended to come from whole grains. Examples of an ounce equivalent include 1 slice of bread, 1 cup of cereal, 1/2 cup of cooked pasta or rice. You can determine how much you need by checking the U.S. government's MyPlate website.


    More Whole Grain Products

    The good news is that whole grains are not necessarily brown or only found in adult cereals. You can find them throughout the food supply, including many processed foods.

    Since the 2005 U.S. Dietary Guidelines recommended that Americans eat more whole grains, there has been an explosion of whole-grain options. Even many restaurants now offer brown rice and other whole grains options.

    For whole-grain nutrition without the "grainy" taste, there are newly reformulated products that use lighter whole wheats and new processing techniques to make them look and taste more like white flour.

    These "white whole-grain" products are a great way to transition into eating more whole grains, particularly if your kids are turning their noses up at them.


    Whole Grains and Fiber

    Whole grains can be an excellent source of fiber. But not all whole grains are good sources of fiber. Whole wheat contains among the highest amount of fiber of the whole grains. Brown rice contains the least.

    For most people, whole grains are their diet's best source of fiber.

    Most whole-grain sources yield from 1-4 grams of fiber per serving, comparable to fruits and vegetables, and just the right amount when spread throughout the day.

    Can't fiber supplements give you the same benefit? While you get plenty of fiber from these supplements, you'll miss out on all the other nutritional benefits of whole grains. However, if you know you're not getting at least 25 grams of fiber per day, fiber supplements are a great way to help you get there.


    8 Easy Ways to Get More Whole Grains into Your Diet

    Learning to enjoy whole grains is simply a matter of retraining your taste buds to become familiar with the fuller, nuttier flavor of the grain, experts say.

    Whole grains taste and feel different to the mouth, and therefore it takes time to adjust to these new grains.


    Here are eight easy ways to work more whole grains into your daily diet:

    1. Choose whole-grain breads, cereals, English muffins, waffles, bagels, and crackers. Enjoy a sandwich at lunch with two slices of whole-grain bread, or a whole-grain pita or wrap, and you're two-thirds of the way toward meeting your goal.
    2. Eat popcorn. What could be easier than eating air-popped popcorn as a snack? A study in the 2008 May issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association found that people who regularly ate popcorn averaged 2.5 servings of whole grains per day, while non-popcorn eaters got less than one serving.
    3. Make your snacks whole grain. Snacks account for one-third of whole grain consumption - just make sure you choose the right ones. Check the label, because even though it is made with a whole grain, it could still be high in fat, calories, and sodium.
    4. Start your day with a bowl of whole-grain cereal. Members of the National Weight Control Registry who have lost substantial amounts of weight -- and kept it off -- swear by the importance of eating a nutritious breakfast, such as cereal, each day. But keep in mind that even when a product is made from whole grain, it's not necessarily healthy. Read the label and select cereals based on the whole-grain content and amount of sugar it contains. The less sugar, the better.
    5. Add whole grains to your baked goods. Try blending half whole-wheat flour with all-purpose flour to boost the whole-grain content of your baked goods. You can also use white wheat flour, available in your local grocery store. Another option is to replace one-third of the flour with whole-grain oats.
    6. Choose brown rice and whole-wheat or blended pasta. Cook up a batch of brown rice and keep it in your refrigerator for 4-5 day and eat on it throughout the week. If time is an issue, there are ready brown rice products. Try whole-grain pasta, or some of the blended pastas made with a mix of whole and refined grains. Don't be put off by the dark color of whole-grain pasta. It becomes much lighter when it is cooked.
    7. Experiment with different grains. Visit your local health food market and try your hand at some of the less-familiar whole grains available. Try risottos, pilafs, whole-grain salads, and other grain dishes made with brown rice, millet, quinoa, or sorghum. Add uncooked oats to meatloaf or stir oats into yogurt for crunch and added nutrition.
    8. Start your kids off right. Expose your kids to whole grains at an early age. For older kids, try the white whole-wheat flour, and incorporate whole grains into foods that have other flavors such as French toast. Serve burgers on whole-grain buns or brown rice with veggies. Add whole grains to soups or dishes like shrimp Creole. Try whole-wheat pitas as crusts for make-your-own individual pizzas.
     
    Paradosiaka

    Paradosiaka

    Well-Known Member
    Migraine

    Foods, drink and eating habits have long been blamed for triggering migraines in sufferers. Some studies show that about 20 percent of migraine sufferers count certain foods as triggers. Other studies report that anywhere from 7 percent to 44 percent of migraine sufferers point to certain foods as triggers.

    Sometimes it’s not necessarily the food itself that triggers the attack, it may be an additive in the food such as food coloring that launches the migraine attack.

    Specific foods may serve as triggers in some individuals, while others might suffer a migraine attack if they miss a meal. Studies show that almost half of people with migraines have attacks if they fast. The migraine typically occurs after roughly 16 hours of fasting. The reason behind this isn’t certain, but some researchers believe that without food the body produces stress hormones, which activate chemicals in the brain responsible for migraines.

    Another belief is that the food cravings are actually part of the disease which leads to eating non-typical foods, such as chocolate. In this scenario, the food itself may not be the trigger.

    Most common foods that trigger migraines
    • Chocolate, 75 percent
    • Cheese, particularly aged cheese, 48 percent
    • Citrus fruits , 30 percent
    • Alcohol, particularly red wine and beer, 25 percent

    An additional list of foods that trigger migraines
    • Ham, hot dogs, other cured meats
    • Monosodium glutamate, MSG, commonly found in Chinese foods, soy sauce and packaged foods
    • Asparatame and other artificial sweeteners
    • Asian foods
    • Snack foods
    • Fatty foods
    • Ice cream and other frozen foods
    • Food dyes
    • Coffee, tea, cola (other items containing caffeine and caffeine withdrawal)
    • Dairy products, yogurt
     
    EuroMode

    EuroMode

    Active Member
    'Don't use Wikipedia for medical advice', scientists warn after errors found



    It may seem obvious but scientists are warning people to avoid using Wikipedia for medical advice after errors were found in nine out of 10 articles on serious conditions.

    A US study compared Wikipedia articles with peer-reviewed medical information on lung cancer, depression, diabetes, coronary heart disease and other illnesses.

    The report, published in the The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, concluded that patients were putting themselves at risk by using the website as an alternative to GP consultations and even medical students were being misled.

    Wikipedia is the most popular site for general reference on the internet and contained more than 31 million articles in 285 languages in March, it said.

    Although widespread inaccuracies, either accidental or deliberate, are well-known, it has become a popular source of healthcare information, with between 47 and 70 per cent of physicians and medical students admitting to using it as a reference.

    Researchers suspected the actual figure may be higher because people surveyed were reluctant to admit using the site and said it “certainly has an influence” on medical decision-making.

    The lead author of the report, Robert Hasty, from Campbell University’s Jerry M. Wallace School of Osteopathic Medicine, said the best resource when looking for a diagnosis is to speak to a GP.

    He added: “While Wikipedia is a convenient tool for conducting research, from a public health standpoint patients should not use it as a primary resource because those articles do not go through the same peer-review process as medical journals.”

    Dr Hasty encouraged doctors to familiarise themselves with editing on Wikipedia and join together to improve content.

    Stevie Benton, from the website's British arm Wikimedia UK, said there are a number of initiatives to improve accuracy in articles, including WikiProject Medicine.

    The project brings experts together to identify articles needing improvements and collaborate to make them more accurate with credible sources.

    He added: "It is crucial that anybody with concerns over their health contacts their GP as a first point of call. Wikipedia, like any encyclopaedia, should not take the place of a qualified medical practitioner.”

    Wikimedia UK is working with Cancer Research UK on a review of cancer-related articles.

    The 10 pages studied by researchers were selected as the most costly conditions in terms of public and private expenditure in the US.

    A page on concussions was the only one found to be without “many errors”, some of which were deemed significant.

    source independent
     
    EuroMode

    EuroMode

    Active Member
    Big Hospital Finally telling the truth about Cancer, Johns Hopkins

    LATEST CANCER INFORMATION from Johns Hopkins

    AFTER YEARS OF TELLING PEOPLE CHEMOTHERAPY IS THE ONLY WAY TO TRY AND ELIMINATE CANCER, JOHNS HOPKINS IS FINALLY STARTING TO TELL YOU THERE IS AN ALTERNATIVE WAY …

    1. Every person has cancer cells in the body. These cancer cells do not show up in the standard tests until they have multiplied to a few billion. When doctors tell cancer patients that there are no more cancer cells in their bodies after treatment, it just means the tests are unable to detect the cancer cells because they have not reached the detectable size.

    2. Cancer cells occur between 6 to more than 10 times in a person’s lifetime.

    3. When the person’s immune system is strong the cancer cells will be destroyed and prevented from multiplying and forming tumors.

    4. When a person has cancer it indicates the person has multiple nutritional deficiencies. These could be due to genetic, environmental, food and lifestyle factors.

    5. To overcome the multiple nutritional deficiencies, changing diet and including supplements will strengthen the immune system.

    6. Chemotherapy involves poisoning the rapidly-growing cancer cells and also destroys rapidly-growing healthy cells in the bone marrow, gastro-intestinal tract etc, and can cause organ damage, like liver, kidneys, heart, lungs etc.

    7. Radiation while destroying cancer cells also burns, scars and damages healthy cells, tissues and organs.

    8. Initial treatment with chemotherapy and radiation will often reduce tumor size. However prolonged use of chemotherapy and radiation do not result in more tumor destruction.

    9. When the body has too much toxic burden from chemotherapy and radiation the immune system is either compromised or destroyed, hence the person can succumb to various kinds of infections and complications.

    10. Chemotherapy and radiation can cause cancer cells to mutate and become resistant and difficult to destroy. Surgery can also cause cancer cells to spread to other sites.

    11. An effective way to battle cancer is to STARVE the cancer cells by not feeding it with foods it needs to multiple.

    What cancer cells feed on:

    a. Sugar is a cancer-feeder. By cutting off sugar it cuts off one important food supply to the cancer cells. Note:Sugar substitutes like NutraSweet, Equal, Spoonful, etc are made with Aspartame and it is harmful. A better natural substitute would be Manuka honey or molasses but only in very small amounts. Table salt has a chemical added to make it white in colour. Better alternative is Bragg’s aminos or sea salt.

    b. Milk causes the body to produce mucus, especially in the gastro-intestinal tract. Cancer feeds on mucus. By cutting off milk and substituting with unsweetened soy milk, cancer cells will starved.

    c. Cancer cells thrive in an acid environment. A meat-based diet is acidic and it is best to eat fish, and a little chicken rather than beef or pork. Meat also contains livestock antibiotics, growth hormones and parasites, which are all harmful, especially to people with cancer.

    d. A diet made of 80% fresh vegetables and juice, whole grains, seeds, nuts and a little fruits help put the body into an alkaline environment. About 20% can be from cooked food including beans. Fresh vegetable juices provide live enzymes that are easily absorbed and reach down to cellular levels within 15 minutes t o nourish and enhance growth of healthy cells.

    To obtain live enzymes for building healthy cells try and drink fresh vegetable juice (most vegetables including bean sprouts) and eat some raw vegetables 2 or 3 times a day. Enzymes are destroyed at temperatures of 104 degrees F (40 degrees C).

    e. Avoid coffee, tea, and chocolate, which have high caffeine. Green tea is a better alternative and has cancer-fighting properties. Water–best to drink purified water, or filtered, to avoid known toxins and heavy metals in tap water. Distilled water is acidic, avoid it.

    12. Meat protein is difficult to digest and requires a lot of digestive enzymes. Undigested meat remaining in the intestines will become putrified and leads to more toxic buildup.

    13. Cancer cell walls have a tough protein covering. By refraining from or eating less meat it frees more enzymes to attack the protein walls of cancer cells and allows the body’s killer cells to destroy the cancer cells.

    14. Some supplements build up the immune system (IP6, Flor-ssence, Essiac, anti-oxidants, vitamins, minerals, EFAs etc.) to enable the body’s own killer cells to destroy cancer cells. Other supplements like vitamin E are known to cause apoptosis, or programmed cell death, the body’s normal method of disposing of damaged, unwanted, or unneeded cells.

    15. Cancer is a disease of the mind, body, and spirit. A proactive and positive spirit will help the cancer warrior be a survivor.

    Anger, unforgiving and bitterness put the body into a stressful and acidic environment. Learn to have a loving and forgiving spirit. Learn to relax and enjoy life.

    16. Cancer cells cannot thrive in an oxygenated environment. Exercising daily, and deep breathing help to get more oxygen down to the cellular level. Oxygen therapy is another means employed to destroy cancer cells.

    source
     
    Paradosiaka

    Paradosiaka

    Well-Known Member
    Passion fruit nutrition facts




    Pleasantly sweet and tart, passion fruit or granadilla is rich in health benefiting plant nutrients. Botanically this exotic fruit belongs to the family of Passifloraceae, of the genus Passiflora. Scientific name: Passiflora edulis.

    Passions are native to subtropical wild regions of South America probably originated in Paraguay. The plant is an avid climber (vine) which grows on anything it can grab through tendrils.

    The passiflora plant requires well-drained fertile soil and good moisture to flourish. It grows quickly and reaches about 15-20 feet per annum once established. Its average life span is about 5-7 years.

    Over five hundred cultivate types exist; however, two main type purple and yellow passion fruits are widely cultivated. During each season, the vine bears greenish-white fragrant flowers. The fruit features round to oval shape, 4 to 8 centimeters in diameter, have a tough shell mangosteen-like rind. Average weight is about 35-50 g.

    Inside, the fruit consists of membranous sacs containing light orange-colored, pulpy juice with numerous small, hard, dark-brown or black, pitted seeds. Yellow passions are generally larger than the purple varieties, but the pulp of the purple fruit is less acid, richer in aroma and flavor, and has a higher proportion of juicy pulp.


    Health benefits of passion fruit

    • Delicious, passion fruit is rich source of antioxidants, minerals, vitamins and fiber. 100 g fruit contains about 97 calories.
    • The fruit is a very good source of dietary fiber. 100 g fruit pulp contains 10.4 g or 27% of fiber. Good fiber in the diet helps remove cholesterol from the body. In addition dietary insoluble fiber by acting as a bulk laxative helps protect the colon mucous membrane by decreasing exposure time to toxic substances in the colon as well as binding to cancer-causing chemicals in the colon.
    • Passion fruit is good in vitamin C, providing about 30 mg per 100 g. Vitamin-C (ascorbic acid) is a powerful water soluble anti-oxidant. Consumption of fruits rich in vitamin C helps the body develop resistance against flu-like infectious agents and scavenge harmful, pro-inflammatory free radicals.
    • The fruit contains very good levels of vitamin-A (provides about 1274 IU per 100 g), and flavonoid antioxidants such as β-carotene and cryptoxanthin-β. Current research studies suggest that these compounds have antioxidant properties, and along with vitamin A are essential for good eye-sight.
    • Vitamin A is also required maintaining healthy mucus membranes and skin. Consumption of natural fruits rich in vitamin-A, and flavonoids helps to protect from lung and oral cavity cancers.
    • Fresh granadilla is very rich in potassium. 100 g fruit pulp has about 348 mg of potassium. Potassium is an important component of cells and body fluids, and helps regulate heart rate and blood pressure.
    • Furthermore, granadilla is a very good source of minerals. Iron, copper, magnesium and phosphorus are present in adequate amounts in the fruit
     
    Paradosiaka

    Paradosiaka

    Well-Known Member
    Trendy Foods With Serious Health Benefits



    Food, like fashion, has its trends. And when it comes to the best foods for dieting and weight loss, trends come and go — what's cool one day is passé the next. Usually, foods come into fashion because they're thought to be more healthful than their more mainstream counterparts. Here are a few trendy foods to include in your diet:

    Agave.


    This sugar substitute is thought to be a healthy alternative to granulated sugar in baking. Agave's main benefit is that it scores low on the glycemic index — between 15 and 30 compared with table sugar's 65. This means that consumption won't result in dangerous spikes in blood sugar that table sugar so often causes, making it a possible safe alternative for diabetics.


    Almond butter.


    Almond butter is preferable over peanut butter as it contains more protein and less sugar than the peanut. Still, it's important to eat nut butters in moderation, as most varieties are heavy in calories and fat.

    Quinoa.


    Nutrient-rich whole grains and their high levels of digestion-friendly fiber are an essential component of any balanced diet. A new choice on the whole grain market that's become wildly popular is the South American grain quinoa. Prized for its versatility and high protein content, quinoa has fast become a restaurant and supermarket staple.
     
    Paradosiaka

    Paradosiaka

    Well-Known Member
    10 foods to boost your brainpower

    1. Opt for whole grains
    Like everything else in your body, the brain cannot work without energy. The ability to concentrate and focus comes from the adequate, steady supply of energy - in the form of glucose in our blood to the brain. Achieve this by choosing whole grains with a low-GI, which release glucose slowly into the bloodstream, keeping you mentally alert throughout the day. Opt for 'brown' cereals, wheat bran, granary bread and brown pasta.


    2. Eat oily fish
    Essential fatty acids (EFAs) cannot be made by the body and must be obtained through diet. The most effective omega-3 fats occur naturally in oily fish as EPA and DHA. Good sources include linseed (flaxseed) oil, soya bean oil, pumpkin seeds, walnut oil and soya beans. They are good for healthy brain function, the heart, joints and general well being. Oily fish contains EPA and DHA in a ready-made form, which enables the body to use it easily. The main sources of oily fish include salmon, trout, mackerel, herring, sardines, pilchards and kippers. Low DHA levels have been linked to a higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease and memory loss.


    3. Binge on blueberries
    Evidence accumulated at Tufts University in the United States suggests that the consumption of blueberries may be effective in improving or delaying short term memory loss. Widely available, so there's no excuse.


    4. Eat more tomatoes
    There is good evidence to suggest that lycopene, a powerful antioxidant found in tomatoes, could help protect against the kind of free radical damage to cells which occurs in the development of dementia, particularly Alzheimer


    5. Add vitality with vitamins
    Certain B vitamins - B6, B12 and folic acid - are known to reduce levels of homocysteine in the blood. Elevated levels of homocysteine are associated with increased risk of stroke, cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease. A study of a group of elderly patients with mild cognitive impairment found that after two years of intervention with high doses of B6, B12 and folic acid there was significantly less brain shrinkage compared to a subset given place


    6. Get a blackcurrant boost
    Vitamin C has long been thought to have the power to increase mental agility. One of the best sources of this vital vitamin are blackcurrants.


    7. Pick up pumpkin seeds
    Just a handful of pumpkin seeds a day is all you need to get your recommended daily amount of zinc, vital for enhancing memory and thinking skills.


    8. Bet on broccoli
    A great source of vitamin K, which is known to enhance cognitive function and improve brainpower


    9. Sprinkle on sage
    Sage has long had a reputation for improving memory and although most studies focus on sage as an essential oil, it could be worth adding fresh sage to your diet too


    10. Go nuts
    A study published in the American Journal of Epidemiology suggests that a good intake of vitamin E might help to prevent cognitive decline, particularly in the elderly. Nuts are a great source of vitamin E along with leafy green vegetables, asparagus, olives, seeds, eggs, brown rice and whole grains.
     
    EuroMode

    EuroMode

    Active Member
    Breast cancer gene now linked to lung cancer among smokers





    A gene linked to breast cancer has now been found to increase the chances of someone developing lung cancer, especially if they smoke, a study has found.

    Mutations in the BRCA-2 gene are known to increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancers but for the first time scientists have shown that defects in the same gene significantly raise the probability of developing lung cancer.

    If smokers carry BRCA-2 mutations then their lung cancer risk increases from 15 per cent – the risk that smokers already face – to 25 per cent over the course of their lifetime, the medical researchers found.

    BRCA-2 is one of two “tumour-suppressor genes” that are strongly linked with breast and ovarian cancers when they are mutated. However, until now the gene has not been associated with lung cancer.

    The study, published in the journal Nature Genetics, compared the DNA of 11,348 Europeans with lung cancer with 15,861 people who were free of the disease. The scientists found a BRCA-2 defect known as c.9976T increased the risk of developing lung cancer by about 1.8 times – on top of the risks from smoking.

    This means that about a quarter of smokers who carry the BRCA-2 defect will develop lung cancer at some point in their lives.

    “Smokers in general have nearly a 15 per cent chance of developing lung cancer, far higher than in non-smokers,” said Professor Richard Houlston of the Institute of Cancer Research in London.

    “Our results show that some smokers with BRCA-2 mutations are at an enormous risk of lung cancer – somewhere in the region of 25 per cent over their lifetime,” Professor Houlston said.

    A family of drugs known as the PARP inhibitors have shown some success in treating people with BRCA mutations who have developed breast or ovarian cancers. It is not known yet whether the same drugs are likely to work on lung cancer patients with similar mutations, the researchers said.

    Lung cancer kills more than a million people worldwide each year and it is by the far the biggest cancer killer Britain, Professor Houlston said.

    “We know that the single biggest thing we can do to reduce death rates is to persuade people not to smoke, and our new findings make plain that this is even more critical in people with an underlying genetic risk,” he said.

    source independent
     
    Paradosiaka

    Paradosiaka

    Well-Known Member
    7 steps to better sleep

    Feeling crabby lately? Or simply worn out? Perhaps the solution is better sleep.

    Think about all the factors that can interfere with a good night's sleep — from pressure at work and family responsibilities to unexpected challenges, such as layoffs, relationship issues or illnesses. It's no wonder that quality sleep is sometimes elusive.

    Although you might not be able to control all of the factors that interfere with your sleep, you can adopt habits that encourage better sleep. Start with these simple sleep tips.

    No. 1: Stick to a sleep schedule

    Go to bed and get up at the same time every day, even on weekends, holidays and days off. Being consistent reinforces your body's sleep-wake cycle and helps promote better sleep at night. There's a caveat, though. If you don't fall asleep within about 15 minutes, get up and do something relaxing. Go back to bed when you're tired. If you agonize over falling asleep, you might find it even tougher to nod off.

    No. 2: Pay attention to what you eat and drink

    Don't go to bed either hungry or stuffed. Your discomfort might keep you up. Also limit how much you drink before bed, to prevent disruptive middle-of-the-night trips to the toilet.

    Nicotine, caffeine and alcohol deserve caution, too. The stimulating effects of nicotine and caffeine — which take hours to wear off — can wreak havoc with quality sleep. And even though alcohol might make you feel sleepy at first, it can disrupt sleep later in the night.

    No. 3: Create a bedtime ritual

    Do the same things each night to tell your body it's time to wind down. This might include taking a warm bath or shower, reading a book, or listening to soothing music — preferably with the lights dimmed. Relaxing activities can promote better sleep by easing the transition between wakefulness and drowsiness.

    Be wary of using the TV or other electronic devices as part of your bedtime ritual. Some research suggests that screen time or other media use before bedtime interferes with sleep.

    No. 4: Get comfortable

    Create a room that's ideal for sleeping. Often, this means cool, dark and quiet. Consider using room-darkening shades, earplugs, a fan or other devices to create an environment that suits your needs.

    Your mattress and pillow can contribute to better sleep, too. Since the features of good bedding are subjective, choose what feels most comfortable to you. If you share your bed, make sure there's enough room for two. If you have children or pets, set limits on how often they sleep with you — or insist on separate sleeping quarters.

    No. 5: Limit daytime naps

    Long daytime naps can interfere with nighttime sleep — especially if you're struggling with insomnia or poor sleep quality at night. If you choose to nap during the day, limit yourself to about 10 to 30 minutes and make it during the midafternoon.

    If you work nights, you'll need to make an exception to the rules about daytime sleeping. In this case, keep your window coverings closed so that sunlight — which adjusts your internal clock — doesn't interrupt your daytime sleep.

    No. 6: Include physical activity in your daily routine

    Regular physical activity can promote better sleep, helping you to fall asleep faster and to enjoy deeper sleep. Timing is important, though. If you exercise too close to bedtime, you might be too energized to fall asleep. If this seems to be an issue for you, exercise earlier in the day.

    No. 7: Manage stress

    When you have too much to do — and too much to think about — your sleep is likely to suffer. To help restore peace to your life, consider healthy ways to manage stress. Start with the basics, such as getting organized, setting priorities and delegating tasks. Give yourself permission to take a break when you need one. Share a good laugh with an old friend. Before bed, jot down what's on your mind and then set it aside for tomorrow.
     
    Paradosiaka

    Paradosiaka

    Well-Known Member
    Ways to stop Dizziess

    1. Sit or lie down:
    Dizziness or light-headedness usually hits when you are standing up or movin around. At the first signs of dizziness or light-headedness, sit or lie down immediately. This will usually help to relieve the spinning sensation and is safer in the event that you fall.
    • If you're sitting down, try putting your head between your legs. This increases the blood flow to your brain. Lying down will achieve the same result.
    • Remain seated or lying down for 1-2 minutes, or until the dizziness has passed.

    2.Drink water:
    Dizziness is often the result of dehydration. Dehydration can be caused by not drinking enough water generally or failing to rehydrate during and after exercise. It can also be an issue when you're suffering from an illness that causes vomiting, diarrhea or fever, which can cause you to lose a lot of fluid. Once the worst of the dizziness has passed, you should drink more water and other fluids.

    • If you're finding it difficult to drink a lot of water, try drinking other fluids like energy drinks, hot tea with a little sugar, soups and broths, or diluted fruit juices.

    3. Have something to eat:
    Dizziness can be caused by low blood sugar levels, especially for diabetics.[2] When dizziness hits, try eating a quick snack, preferably something high in carbohydrates or sugar. A bar of chocolate or a banana might do the trick.

    4. Focus on a particular spot:
    To prevent dizziness when spinning, many dancers focus their eyes on a particular spot. The same technique can be used by people who suffer from dizzy spells.

    5.Breathe deeply:
    Dizziness can sometimes be a symptom of an anxiety attack. Often during anxiety attacks it feels as though you cannot get a full breath. But usually the problem is that you're trying to breathe too much. If this is the case, try breathing slowly and deeply. This will help you to calm down and alleviate feelings of dizziness

    6.Avoid bright lights:
    If you are experiencing feelings of dizziness, try to avoid bright lights, or light from a television or laptop.
    • Bright light may cause you to feel disoriented and make the dizziness worse.
    • Try sitting or lying down in a dark room, or close your eyes for a minute or two.

    7.Perform the Epley maneuver:
    The Epley maneuver is a head and neck tilting exercise that can be used to treat symptoms of vertigo. The Epley maneuver forces the calcium crystal debris causing vertigo to slip into an area of the inner ear where it can no longer cause symptoms. To perform the Epley maneuver:
    • Sit down and tilt your head 45 degrees horizontally towards the affected ear.
    • Lie back into a horizontal position, keeping your head hanging at a 45-degree turn. Hold this position for a minute or two. You should feel the vertigo subside.
    • Turn your head 90 degrees toward the unaffected ear. Roll onto the side of the unaffected ear. You should now be looking at the floor.
    • Hold this position. You may experience another attack of vertigo, but this should subside within a minute.
    • Slowly return to a seated position
     
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