Healthy Recipes

Indie

Indie

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
One of the stated goals in my moderators' election campaign was to create more discussions in the community forums. I thought a good way to start is a thread where we can share healthy recipes with each other.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I'll start with smoothies :)

- They are not only delicious, they are very easy to make. All you need is a blender.

- You can make them 100% healthy by using only ingredients that are good for you. A lot of smoothie bars or restaurants use sugar or ice cream in their smoothies, which defeats the health benefits. But good smoothie recipes can be completely healthy and tasty at the same time.

- A lot of people can't, or forget to eat their daily servings of fruits and vegetables. It's much easier to drink a smoothie than to eat three or four different fruits every day.

- Even if you're not hungry, they give you a lot of nutrients in a cup...that you can take your time drinking, instead of coffee, for example.

- If you are hungry but in a rush, you can make a smoothie in five minutes and take it to go. It will give you energy until your next meal.

- The possibilities and flavors are endless, so you'll never get bored. Speaking of which, if you make smoothies yourself, share your favorite recipes and tips :)


Some tips and recipes from the following website: The Only 4 Smoothie Recipes You'll Ever Need


TIPS

- Plants are most nutrient-dense at peak season. So when putting together a smoothie, try to use the freshest organic ingredients from the garden or farmers’ market.

- Add ingredients like milk, yogurt, and water first to get the blender moving. Then, add lighter, drier ingredients, like leafy greens, followed by heavy ingredients like ice and fruit pieces.


RECIPES

Strawberry Mango Spring Smoothie



Makes 3½ cups
  • 1 cup coconut milk
  • 1 banana, peeled, sliced, and frozen
  • 1 mango, skinned and chunked
  • 5 large strawberries, hulled
Combine ingredients in blender and blend until smooth.


Summer Stone Fruit Smoothie



Makes 2 cups
  • 1/2 cup Greek yogurt
  • 1 plum, pit removed, flesh roughly chopped
  • 1 peach, pit removed, flesh roughly chopped
  • 1 nectarine, pit removed, flesh roughly chopped
  • 1/2 cup blueberries, fresh or frozen
Combine ingredients in blender and blend until smooth.


Pumpkin Pie Fall Smoothie



Makes 3 cups
  • 1 cup almond milk
  • 1 teaspoon agave syrup
  • 1 cup pumpkin puree
  • 2 teaspoons cinnamon
  • 1 apple, cored
  • Dried cranberries
Combine all ingredients except cranberries in blender and blend until smooth. Top with cranberries.


Winter Greens Smoothie



Makes 3 cups
  • 1/4 cup carrot juice
  • 1/2 cup orange juice
  • 1 cup spinach
  • 1 cup roughly chopped kale, ribs removed
  • 4 small broccoli florets, sliced and frozen
  • 1 banana, peeled, sliced, and frozen
  • 1 appled, cored and roughly chopped
Combine ingredients in blender and blend until smooth.


Top Smoothie Add-Ins



Keep these smoothie staples on hand for an easy and intense nutrition boost:
  • Hemp seeds.
    Vegan protein source with a mild, nutty flavor.
  • Flaxseed.
    Rich in fiber, protein, and omega-3s.
  • Wheat germ.
    One gram of dietary fiber per tablespoon.
  • Sunflower seeds.
    Use shelled seeds for a boost of copper, magnesium, and selenium.
  • Chia seeds.
    Fiber-loaded and protein-rich to control blood sugar; take on flavor of other ingredients.
 
  • Advertisement
  • Iron Maiden

    Iron Maiden

    Paragon of Bacon
    Orange Room Supporter
    RECIPES


    Summer Stone Fruit Smoothie



    Makes 2 cups
    • 1/2 cup Greek yogurt
    • 1 plum, pit removed, flesh roughly chopped
    • 1 peach, pit removed, flesh roughly chopped
    • 1 nectarine, pit removed, flesh roughly chopped
    • 1/2 cup blueberries, fresh or frozen
    Combine ingredients in blender and blend until smooth.
    This is one's new to me but seems delicious will give a try soon enough! thx for the ideas :)

    Winter Greens Smoothie

    Makes 3 cups
    • 1/4 cup carrot juice
    • 1/2 cup orange juice
    • 1 cup spinach
    • 1 cup roughly chopped kale, ribs removed
    • 4 small broccoli florets, sliced and frozen
    • 1 banana, peeled, sliced, and frozen
    • 1 appled, cored and roughly chopped
    @Isabella do u understand now my holy war on kale??? they're puting it in a smoothys now :(
     
    Last edited:
    Indie

    Indie

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    @Isabella do u understand now my holy war on kale??? they're puting it in a smoothys now :(
    I'm aware of a kale fad going on...not sure I've ever had any, though. What does it taste like? And why should it / should it not go in a smoothie? :p
     
    Iron Maiden

    Iron Maiden

    Paragon of Bacon
    Orange Room Supporter
    I'm aware of a kale fad going on...not sure I've ever had any, though. What does it taste like? And why should it / should it not go in a smoothie? :p
    tasted it once, nothing special to it like cabbage really, as to why it should go into a smmoothie, well its pretty healthy, but for me smoothyz supposed to be sugary, so its a nono for me.

    but since it's the latest fashion to come from scandinavia hipsters flock to it and judge other people that do not consume it.

    and hipsters be my nemesis
    so you probably know now what my next thread will be :p
     
    Big Brother

    Big Brother

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    I suggest we rename this thread... O-Room Recipes! So members of the forum can contribute their own recipes :p.

    From the kitchen of Muki:

    Chicken Alfredo Pasta
    • 1 lb chicken breast, diced
    • 1 pound fettuccine noodles, cooked
    • 1/2 stick of butter, unsalted or regular
    • 2 tbsp. fresh garlic, chopped
    • 1 cup broccoli, chopped
    • 1 cup mushrooms, sliced
    • 1 cup parmesan cheese, grated
    • 3 cups heavy cream or creme fresch
    • 2 tbsp. salt
    • 1 tbsp. white pepper
    • 1 tbsp. basil
    • 1 tbsp. oregano
    You can also add 1/2 cup of sun dried tomato if you like. It's optional; I'm not a fan of them, but fiancé loves them.

    Cooking Instructions:
    1. In a medium sauce pot over medium flame, add the butter and melt.
    2. Once melted, add the garlic until the garlic starts to cook.
    3. Add the chicken and sautée for 3 minutes, stirring frequently.
    4. Add the vegetables and spices and sautée until veggies are tender.
    5. Add the heavy cream and bring all ingredients to a light boil and reduce lightly.
    6. Add the parmesan cheese over low flame and stir until the sauce thickens.
    7. Add the noodles, cook for an additional two minutes and serve.
     
    Big Brother

    Big Brother

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    From the kitchen of Muki:

    Space Cake Butter

    Note that I'm not going to specify amounts - amount of butter depends on the size of the cake.
    1. Melt the butter in a pan (don't let it go brown). Low heat works best.
    2. When melted, add the weed in the pan for about 15 minutes. Keep turning the weed around so the butter gets all over it. The butter will suck up all the THC from the plant.
    3. After 15 minutes, you can throw the weed away, as all the THC is extracted from it.
    Additional tip:
    • Once the butter is liquid, you don't have to keep heating it. Let it cool down. In other words, don't cook the plant. All that has to be done is let the butter (fat) be in contact with the plant (THC).
    Use the butter to make cake or brownies.
     
    Last edited:
    Indie

    Indie

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    From the kitchen of Muki:

    Space Cake Butter

    Note that I'm not going to specify amounts - amount of butter depends on the size of the cake.
    1. Melt the butter in a pan (don't let it go brown). Low heat works best.
    2. When melted, add the weed in the pan for about 15 minutes. Keep turning the weed around so the butter gets all over it. The butter will suck up all the THC from the plant.
    3. After 15 minutes, you can throw the weed away, as all the THC is extracted from it.
    Additional tip:
    • Once the butter is liquid, you don't have to keep heating it. Let it cool down. In other words, don't cook the plant. All that has to be done is let the butter (fat) be in contact with the plant (THC).
    Use the butter to make cake or brownies.
    I'm not going to delete this post. Only because laughter can be considered a healthy recipe o_O
     
    LEBANESE-CIA

    LEBANESE-CIA

    Legendary Member
    From the kitchen of Muki:
    Space Cake Butter

    1. Melt the butter in a pan (don't let it go brown). Low heat works best.
    2. When melted, add the weed in the pan for about 15 minutes. Keep turning the weed around so the butter gets all over it. The butter will suck up all the THC from the plant.
    3. After 15 minutes, you can throw the weed away, as all the THC is extracted from it................................Use the butter to make cake or brownies.
    Basically you called it "space Cake" : ) but in fact what you did is a process of Osmosis and Diffusion with the butter & THC. Some ppl might not take it seriously, however THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) itself with the appropriate amounts fight cancer cells. So in a way your recipe even you were joking, it might fall under a homeopathic Health Recipe indeed. ( although I would have substituted the butter with coconut oil & low temp to avoid oxidation)

    sa7teine : )
     
    Indie

    Indie

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    This thread has taken a very different direction from the one intended :)
     
    Big Brother

    Big Brother

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Here, @Indie, I'll give you an example :p:

    From the kitchen of Muki:

    Muki's Lazy Meal

    Ingredients
    • 1 phone
    • 1 girlfriend phone number
    • 1 tongue
    Instructions
    1. Call your girlfriend.
    2. Tell her to make you food.
    Bon appétit!
     
    Indie

    Indie

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Here, @Indie, I'll give you an example :p:

    From the kitchen of Muki:

    Muki's Lazy Meal

    Ingredients
    • 1 phone
    • 1 girlfriend phone number
    • 1 tongue
    Instructions
    1. Call your girlfriend.
    2. Tell her to make you food.
    Bon appétit!
    3. Good luck trying to digest the very spicy "recipe" she serves you.
    4. Enjoy the couch.
     
    Booyakasha

    Booyakasha

    Legendary Member
    One of the stated goals in my moderators' election campaign was to create more discussions in the community forums. I thought a good way to start is a thread where we can share healthy recipes with each other.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    I'll start with smoothies :)

    - They are not only delicious, they are very easy to make. All you need is a blender.

    - You can make them 100% healthy by using only ingredients that are good for you. A lot of smoothie bars or restaurants use sugar or ice cream in their smoothies, which defeats the health benefits. But good smoothie recipes can be completely healthy and tasty at the same time.

    - A lot of people can't, or forget to eat their daily servings of fruits and vegetables. It's much easier to drink a smoothie than to eat three or four different fruits every day.

    - Even if you're not hungry, they give you a lot of nutrients in a cup...that you can take your time drinking, instead of coffee, for example.

    - If you are hungry but in a rush, you can make a smoothie in five minutes and take it to go. It will give you energy until your next meal.

    - The possibilities and flavors are endless, so you'll never get bored. Speaking of which, if you make smoothies yourself, share your favorite recipes and tips :)


    Some tips and recipes from the following website: The Only 4 Smoothie Recipes You'll Ever Need


    TIPS

    - Plants are most nutrient-dense at peak season. So when putting together a smoothie, try to use the freshest organic ingredients from the garden or farmers’ market.

    - Add ingredients like milk, yogurt, and water first to get the blender moving. Then, add lighter, drier ingredients, like leafy greens, followed by heavy ingredients like ice and fruit pieces.


    RECIPES

    Strawberry Mango Spring Smoothie



    Makes 3½ cups
    • 1 cup coconut milk
    • 1 banana, peeled, sliced, and frozen
    • 1 mango, skinned and chunked
    • 5 large strawberries, hulled
    Combine ingredients in blender and blend until smooth.


    Summer Stone Fruit Smoothie



    Makes 2 cups
    • 1/2 cup Greek yogurt
    • 1 plum, pit removed, flesh roughly chopped
    • 1 peach, pit removed, flesh roughly chopped
    • 1 nectarine, pit removed, flesh roughly chopped
    • 1/2 cup blueberries, fresh or frozen
    Combine ingredients in blender and blend until smooth.


    Pumpkin Pie Fall Smoothie



    Makes 3 cups
    • 1 cup almond milk
    • 1 teaspoon agave syrup
    • 1 cup pumpkin puree
    • 2 teaspoons cinnamon
    • 1 apple, cored
    • Dried cranberries
    Combine all ingredients except cranberries in blender and blend until smooth. Top with cranberries.


    Winter Greens Smoothie



    Makes 3 cups
    • 1/4 cup carrot juice
    • 1/2 cup orange juice
    • 1 cup spinach
    • 1 cup roughly chopped kale, ribs removed
    • 4 small broccoli florets, sliced and frozen
    • 1 banana, peeled, sliced, and frozen
    • 1 appled, cored and roughly chopped
    Combine ingredients in blender and blend until smooth.


    Top Smoothie Add-Ins



    Keep these smoothie staples on hand for an easy and intense nutrition boost:
    • Hemp seeds.
      Vegan protein source with a mild, nutty flavor.
    • Flaxseed.
      Rich in fiber, protein, and omega-3s.
    • Wheat germ.
      One gram of dietary fiber per tablespoon.
    • Sunflower seeds.
      Use shelled seeds for a boost of copper, magnesium, and selenium.
    • Chia seeds.
      Fiber-loaded and protein-rich to control blood sugar; take on flavor of other ingredients.
    You should watch a movie called 'That sugar film' - it should/will change your mind about fruit juices/smoothies
     
    Indie

    Indie

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    You should watch a movie called 'That sugar film' - it should/will change your mind about fruit juices/smoothies
    Does it include home-made juices / smoothies that are 100% made with fresh fruits? Because, if that's the case, it would mean eating fruits is unhealthy. The only difference being that one is in solid form while the other in liquid form.
     
    Isabella

    Isabella

    The queen of "Bazella"
    Orange Room Supporter
    Does it include home-made juices / smoothies that are 100% made with fresh fruits? Because, if that's the case, it would mean eating fruits is unhealthy. The only difference being that one is in solid form while the other in liquid form.
    No the premise of the movie is that "light" products are unhealthy! He doesn't attack fruit, he ate 40 t.s. Of sugar for 60 days
     
    Indie

    Indie

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    No the premise of the movie is that "light" products are unhealthy! He doesn't attack fruit, he ate 40 t.s. Of sugar for 60 days
    Oh...well that's pretty obvious. All "processed" foods are unhealthy. Including those labeled as "light" or "diet." This has nothing to do with homemade fruit juices though. Unless you're adding sugar to them.
     
    Booyakasha

    Booyakasha

    Legendary Member
    Does it include home-made juices / smoothies that are 100% made with fresh fruits? Because, if that's the case, it would mean eating fruits is unhealthy. The only difference being that one is in solid form while the other in liquid form.
    Any pressed juice contains very high amounts of sugar. The solid form gets you full in order to avoid overeating. You feel full after eating an apple, but pressing 5 apples into a juice still leaves way for you to eat more. Yes the pressed juices contain fructose and not glucose/sucrose but your liver will kind of overdose on it anyway.

    More here:


    Smoothies and fruit juices are a new risk to health, US scientists warn
    Scientists say potential damage from naturally occurring fructose in apparently healthy drinks is being overlooked
    Smoothies and fruit juices are a new risk to health, US scientists warn | Society | The Guardian

    Fruit juices and smoothies represent a new risk to our health because of the amount of sugar the apparently healthy drinks contain, warn the US scientists who blew the whistle on corn syrup in soft drinks a decade ago.

    Barry Popkin and George Bray pointed the finger at high fructose corn syrup in soft drinks in 2004, causing a huge headache for the big manufacturers, includingCoca-Cola and Pepsi.

    "Smoothies and fruit juice are the new danger," said Popkin, a distinguished professor at the department of nutrition at the University of North Carolina, in an interview with the Guardian.

    He added: "It's kind of the next step in the evolution of the battle. And it's a really big part of it because in every country they've been replacing soft drinks with fruit juice and smoothies as the new healthy beverage. So you will find that Coke and Pepsi have bought dozens [of fruit juice companies] around the globe."

    In the UK, Coca-Cola owns Innocent smoothies while PepsiCo has Tropicana. Launching Tropicana smoothies in 2008, Pepsi's sales pitch was that the drink would help the nation to reach its five a day fruit and vegetable target. "Smoothies are one of the easiest ways to boost daily fruit intake as each 250ml portion contains the equivalent of 2 fruit portions," it said at the time.

    However, Popkin says the five a day advice needs to change. Drink vegetable juice, he says, but not fruit juice. "Think of eating one orange or two and getting filled," he said. "Now think of drinking a smoothie with six oranges and two hours later it does not affect how much you eat. The entire literature shows that we feel full from drinking beverages like smoothies but it does not affect our overall food intake, whereas eating an orange does. So pulped-up smoothies do nothing good for us but do give us the same amount of sugar as four to six oranges or a large coke. It is deceiving."

    Nine years ago the two scientists had identified sugar-sweetened soft drinks, full of calories and consumed between meals, as a major cause of soaring obesity in developed countries. But they argue that as people change their drinking habits to avoid carbonated soft drinks, the potential damage from naturally occurring fructose in fruit juices and smoothies is being overlooked.

    All sugars are equal in their bad effects, says Popkin – even those described on cereal snack bars sold in health food shops as containing "completely natural" sweeteners. "The most important issue about added sugar is that everybody thinks it's cane sugar or maybe beet sugar or HFC syrup or all the other syrups but globally the cheapest thing on the market almost is fruit juice concentrate coming out of China. It has created an overwhelming supply of apple juice concentrate. It is being used everywhere and it also gets around the sugar quotas that lots of countries have."

    In a survey of sweeteners in US food products between 2005 and 2009 for a paper published in 2012, Popkin and colleagues found that fruit juice concentrate was the fifth most common sugar overall and the second most common, after corn syrup, in soft drinks and in babies' formula milk.

    More studies need to be done before governments and health bodies around the world will take notice. There are only two really good long-term trials – one in Singapore and one by Harvard, he says. "But all the long term studies on fruit juice in anything show the same kind of effect whether it's a smoothie or natural [juice] and whether it's a diabetes or weight gain effect," Popkin added.

    Further evidence supporting the theory came last week from a study published by the British Medical Association. Researchers from the UK, USA and Singapore found that, in large-scale studies involving nurses, people who ate whole fruit, especially blueberries, grapes and apples, were less likely to get type 2 diabetes, which is obesity-related, but those who drank fruit juice were at increased risk. People who swapped their fruit juice for whole fruits three times a week cut their risk by 7%.

    Most of the attention from those concerned about growing obesity levels among children is still on soft drinks with added sugar, such as colas and lemonade, which are consumed in enormous quantities. In 2012 we drank nearly 227 litres of liquid each in the UK, according to the industry, which says 61% of those had no added sugar. Excluding water brings the "no added sugar" total to 54%. Fruit juices and smoothies are also included in the total. We each drank 17.6 litres of those.

    British health campaigners are calling for a soft drinks tax in the UK. In January Sustain published its Children's Future Fund report, saying that £1bn a year could be raised from a tax of 20p a litre and invested in children's health programmes. It has been backed by more than 60 organisations and the first children's commissioner, Al Aynsley-Green, gave his support. In February the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges also called for the tax in its obesity report.

    The British Soft Drinks Association says that consumption of soft drinks containing added sugar has fallen by 9% over the last 10 years, while the incidence of obesity has risen by 15%. "Obesity is a serious and complex problem requiring concerted action by a wide range of organisations as well as by people themselves. Soft drinks companies recognise the role they have to play," it said. Companies were reducing the calorie content of their drinks. PepsiCo, it said, had only advertised the no added sugar variants of its soft drinks since 2005.

    Innocent Smoothies claims that people who drink juice have better diets and lower rates of obesity than others, although the studies it cited had funding from the juice industry.

    "Smoothies are made entirely from fruit and therefore contain the same amount of sugars that you would find in an equivalent amount of whole fruit," it said in a statement.

    Meanwhile, efforts by the soft drinks companies to grow the market continue. Coca-Cola in the UK this year declared its ambition to increase the market by £2.1bn by 2017, identifying six "moments" in the day when we could be persuaded to buy more soft drinks, including fruit juice and smoothies for breakfast and soft drinks for children when they come home from school. Sales of sweetened Coca-Cola, containing nine teaspoons of sugar in a standard can, still outstrip those of Diet Coke and Zero Coke combined.

    "Unless Coca-Cola drastically reduces its marketing for sugary drinks, its strategy to reach more people more often will mean that it pumps record levels of sugar into our diets," said Charlie Powell, campaigns director of Sustain.

    "This is a business model that is unhealthy and unsustainable, perfectly highlighting the 'profit versus public health' conflict of interest endemic in the sugary drinks industry."

    Coca-Cola argues that taxes do not change behaviour and that sugar should not be vilified. In a statement, it said: "We believe that rather than single out any ingredient, it is more helpful for people to look at their total energy balance. This is because obesity and weight gain are caused by an imbalance in calories consumed and burnt off. Our products should be enjoyed as part of a sensible, balanced diet and healthy lifestyle that includes regular physical activity.

    "For those that are watching their calorie intake, we offer a wide range of low or no calorie options, which represent more than one third of our sales."

    In an article this year in the journal Pediatric Obesity, Bray and Popkin review the issue 10 years on from their famous paper. "The concern with HFCS in our diet has led to a reduced proportion of HFCS in beverages compared to other sugars," they say, but add "this is a misplaced shift … fructose remains a major component of our global diet. To date, to the best of our knowledge every added amount of fructose – be it from fruit juice, sugar-sweetened beverages or any other beverage or even from foods with high sugar content – adds equally to our health concerns linked with this food component."
     
    Iron Maiden

    Iron Maiden

    Paragon of Bacon
    Orange Room Supporter
    Any pressed juice contains very high amounts of sugar. The solid form gets you full in order to avoid overeating. You feel full after one full apple, but pressing 5 apples into a juice still leave way for you to eat more. Yes the pressed juices contain fructose and not glucose/sucrose but your liver will kind of overdose on it anyway.

    More here:


    Smoothies and fruit juices are a new risk to health, US scientists warn
    Scientists say potential damage from naturally occurring fructose in apparently healthy drinks is being overlooked
    Smoothies and fruit juices are a new risk to health, US scientists warn | Society | The Guardian

    Fruit juices and smoothies represent a new risk to our health because of the amount of sugar the apparently healthy drinks contain, warn the US scientists who blew the whistle on corn syrup in soft drinks a decade ago.

    Barry Popkin and George Bray pointed the finger at high fructose corn syrup in soft drinks in 2004, causing a huge headache for the big manufacturers, includingCoca-Cola and Pepsi.

    "Smoothies and fruit juice are the new danger," said Popkin, a distinguished professor at the department of nutrition at the University of North Carolina, in an interview with the Guardian.

    He added: "It's kind of the next step in the evolution of the battle. And it's a really big part of it because in every country they've been replacing soft drinks with fruit juice and smoothies as the new healthy beverage. So you will find that Coke and Pepsi have bought dozens [of fruit juice companies] around the globe."

    In the UK, Coca-Cola owns Innocent smoothies while PepsiCo has Tropicana. Launching Tropicana smoothies in 2008, Pepsi's sales pitch was that the drink would help the nation to reach its five a day fruit and vegetable target. "Smoothies are one of the easiest ways to boost daily fruit intake as each 250ml portion contains the equivalent of 2 fruit portions," it said at the time.

    However, Popkin says the five a day advice needs to change. Drink vegetable juice, he says, but not fruit juice. "Think of eating one orange or two and getting filled," he said. "Now think of drinking a smoothie with six oranges and two hours later it does not affect how much you eat. The entire literature shows that we feel full from drinking beverages like smoothies but it does not affect our overall food intake, whereas eating an orange does. So pulped-up smoothies do nothing good for us but do give us the same amount of sugar as four to six oranges or a large coke. It is deceiving."

    Nine years ago the two scientists had identified sugar-sweetened soft drinks, full of calories and consumed between meals, as a major cause of soaring obesity in developed countries. But they argue that as people change their drinking habits to avoid carbonated soft drinks, the potential damage from naturally occurring fructose in fruit juices and smoothies is being overlooked.

    All sugars are equal in their bad effects, says Popkin – even those described on cereal snack bars sold in health food shops as containing "completely natural" sweeteners. "The most important issue about added sugar is that everybody thinks it's cane sugar or maybe beet sugar or HFC syrup or all the other syrups but globally the cheapest thing on the market almost is fruit juice concentrate coming out of China. It has created an overwhelming supply of apple juice concentrate. It is being used everywhere and it also gets around the sugar quotas that lots of countries have."

    In a survey of sweeteners in US food products between 2005 and 2009 for a paper published in 2012, Popkin and colleagues found that fruit juice concentrate was the fifth most common sugar overall and the second most common, after corn syrup, in soft drinks and in babies' formula milk.

    More studies need to be done before governments and health bodies around the world will take notice. There are only two really good long-term trials – one in Singapore and one by Harvard, he says. "But all the long term studies on fruit juice in anything show the same kind of effect whether it's a smoothie or natural [juice] and whether it's a diabetes or weight gain effect," Popkin added.

    Further evidence supporting the theory came last week from a study published by the British Medical Association. Researchers from the UK, USA and Singapore found that, in large-scale studies involving nurses, people who ate whole fruit, especially blueberries, grapes and apples, were less likely to get type 2 diabetes, which is obesity-related, but those who drank fruit juice were at increased risk. People who swapped their fruit juice for whole fruits three times a week cut their risk by 7%.

    Most of the attention from those concerned about growing obesity levels among children is still on soft drinks with added sugar, such as colas and lemonade, which are consumed in enormous quantities. In 2012 we drank nearly 227 litres of liquid each in the UK, according to the industry, which says 61% of those had no added sugar. Excluding water brings the "no added sugar" total to 54%. Fruit juices and smoothies are also included in the total. We each drank 17.6 litres of those.

    British health campaigners are calling for a soft drinks tax in the UK. In January Sustain published its Children's Future Fund report, saying that £1bn a year could be raised from a tax of 20p a litre and invested in children's health programmes. It has been backed by more than 60 organisations and the first children's commissioner, Al Aynsley-Green, gave his support. In February the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges also called for the tax in its obesity report.

    The British Soft Drinks Association says that consumption of soft drinks containing added sugar has fallen by 9% over the last 10 years, while the incidence of obesity has risen by 15%. "Obesity is a serious and complex problem requiring concerted action by a wide range of organisations as well as by people themselves. Soft drinks companies recognise the role they have to play," it said. Companies were reducing the calorie content of their drinks. PepsiCo, it said, had only advertised the no added sugar variants of its soft drinks since 2005.

    Innocent Smoothies claims that people who drink juice have better diets and lower rates of obesity than others, although the studies it cited had funding from the juice industry.

    "Smoothies are made entirely from fruit and therefore contain the same amount of sugars that you would find in an equivalent amount of whole fruit," it said in a statement.

    Meanwhile, efforts by the soft drinks companies to grow the market continue. Coca-Cola in the UK this year declared its ambition to increase the market by £2.1bn by 2017, identifying six "moments" in the day when we could be persuaded to buy more soft drinks, including fruit juice and smoothies for breakfast and soft drinks for children when they come home from school. Sales of sweetened Coca-Cola, containing nine teaspoons of sugar in a standard can, still outstrip those of Diet Coke and Zero Coke combined.

    "Unless Coca-Cola drastically reduces its marketing for sugary drinks, its strategy to reach more people more often will mean that it pumps record levels of sugar into our diets," said Charlie Powell, campaigns director of Sustain.

    "This is a business model that is unhealthy and unsustainable, perfectly highlighting the 'profit versus public health' conflict of interest endemic in the sugary drinks industry."

    Coca-Cola argues that taxes do not change behaviour and that sugar should not be vilified. In a statement, it said: "We believe that rather than single out any ingredient, it is more helpful for people to look at their total energy balance. This is because obesity and weight gain are caused by an imbalance in calories consumed and burnt off. Our products should be enjoyed as part of a sensible, balanced diet and healthy lifestyle that includes regular physical activity.

    "For those that are watching their calorie intake, we offer a wide range of low or no calorie options, which represent more than one third of our sales."

    In an article this year in the journal Pediatric Obesity, Bray and Popkin review the issue 10 years on from their famous paper. "The concern with HFCS in our diet has led to a reduced proportion of HFCS in beverages compared to other sugars," they say, but add "this is a misplaced shift … fructose remains a major component of our global diet. To date, to the best of our knowledge every added amount of fructose – be it from fruit juice, sugar-sweetened beverages or any other beverage or even from foods with high sugar content – adds equally to our health concerns linked with this food component."
    how about a pressed steak? :p
     
    Booyakasha

    Booyakasha

    Legendary Member
    Oh...well that's pretty obvious. All "processed" foods are unhealthy. Including those labeled as "light" or "diet." This has nothing to do with homemade fruit juices though. Unless you're adding sugar to them.
    Fruit juices and smoothies contain 'horrifying' sugar levels
    Telegraph analysis shows that many fruit juices and smoothies contain more sugar than the World Health Organisation recommends an average person should consume in a day
    Fruit juices and smoothies contain 'horrifying' sugar levels - Telegraph

    Some fruit juices and smoothies contain four times the amount of sugar the World Health Organisation recommends an average person should consume in a day, a Telegraph analysis shows.

    A survey of 50 products from supermarkets, coffee shops and food outlets found that more than half contained at least six teaspoons of sugar, which is the recommended daily limit.

    Two of the items — large fruit drinks from Costa, the coffee-shop chain — contained at least 23 teaspoons in a single serving.

    Experts and campaigners described the amounts as “horrifying”. They believe that high levels of sugar are contributing to health conditions such as diabetes, heart disease, tooth decay and cancer.

    The findings follow a warning from experts that a healthy diet should include 10 portions of fruit and vegetables a day, doubling the current five-a-day official advice.

    Much of the sugar found in fruit juices is naturally occurring rather than added. However, the NHS advises that fruit juice, restricted to a 150ml serving, should only make up one of the recommended five daily portions.

    It warns that such drinks can damage teeth because sugar that would otherwise be contained within the structure of whole fruit is released when the fruit is juiced or blended.


    Action on Sugar, a campaign group, said ministers should act to remove fruit juices and smoothies from the recommendation, relegating sugary drinks to an “occasional treat”.

    Prof Susan Jebb, a government obesity adviser, warned earlier this year that people should “swap” juice for a piece of fruit, or at least dilute it.

    Aseem Malhotra, a cardiologist and Action on Sugar’s science director, said: “The level of sugar in some of these drinks is horrifying, with many containing well above the upper limit of six

    teaspoons of sugar consumption recommended by the World Health Organisation.

    “In my view sugary drinks such as these should be consumed as an occasional treat, perhaps once a month.

    “Scientific studies have shown that consuming even one sugary drink a day is associated with a significantly increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes even in normal weight people.

    “The Department of Health and the Food Standards Agency must act immediately to remove fruit juice and smoothies from the 'five a day’ recommendations and must emphasise that these drinks should not be recommended to young children as part of a healthy diet.”

    Prof Paula Moynihan, professor of nutrition at the University of Newcastle, who advised the WHO on its sugar limits, added that many of the drinks seemed “unnecessarily large”. Some of the drinks served by food outlets amounted to almost two-thirds of a litre.

    Waitrose said it was introducing a new range of fruit juices with reduced sugar levels — as well as replacing existing drinks — as the supermarket acknowledged they could contain “high levels” of naturally occurring sugar.

    The Telegraph carried out a survey of 50 fruit juices, smoothies and other fruit-based drinks on sale at a series of supermarkets, high-street shops and food outlets.

    Of the items surveyed, 21 contained more than six teaspoons of sugar — which equates to around 24g. Ten drinks contained 12 or more teaspoons.

    Costa’s “red berry cooler” had the highest amount of sugar of the products examined, with a “massimo” (610ml) takeaway cup containing 97.1g, or around 24 teaspoons — four times the daily limit now advised by the WHO.

    Costa’s tropical fruit and mango and passion fruit drinks contained 23 and 17 teaspoons of sugar respectively in a massimo serving.

    Other drinks containing 12 or more teaspoons of sugar included Caffè Nero’s 655ml raspberry, orange and green tea “fruit booster”, which had 17 teaspoons; Starbucks’ “venti” (591ml) raspberry blackcurrant frappuccino contained 14 teaspoons; a large (500ml) strawberry and banana iced fruit smoothie from McDonald’s had 13 teaspoons, and Pret a Manger’s “beet beautiful juice” contained 12 teaspoons in a 400ml bottle.

    Many of the drinks from coffee shops and food outlets came in much larger sizes than the bottles sold in supermarkets, or the recommended serving — usually between 150ml and 250ml — listed on larger cartons of drinks. However, of the 29 drinks containing six or more teaspoons of sugar, 14 were from supermarkets.

    They included fruit juices and smoothies produced by Tesco, Sainsbury’s, Waitrose and Asda. Forty-one of the drinks examined — the vast majority — contained five or more teaspoons of sugar in a single serving.

    Last week the WHO closed a consultation on new draft guidance, which retains its current formal recommendation that no more than 10 per cent of an individual’s daily calories should come from “free” sugar – the equivalent of 12 “level” teaspoons — for the average adult (one level teaspoon equates to around 4g).

    “Free” sugar is added sugar, plus that naturally present in honey, syrups and fruit juices.

    However, its proposed guidelines state that a further reduction to 5 per cent – around six teaspoons – “would have additional benefits”.

    A senior official from the WHO described the target as the “ideal” limit for which people should now aim.

    Retailers insisted that clear labelling, or nutritional information detailed on their websites, enabled consumers to make “informed” choices.

    A spokesman for Costa said: “Costa seeks to provide customers with a choice of products across its drink and food ranges, allowing them to choose lower-calorie options if they so wish as well as a more indulgent occasional treat.”

    A spokesman for Pret A Manger said: “We believe that natural sugars extracted from fresh fruit and vegetables are a better alternative to artificial sugars such as aspartame and fructose-glucose syrups, which are so commonly found today.”
     
    Top