How religious are you?

Are you...


  • Total voters
    21
Indie

Indie

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
So...how religious are you? Please answer the poll and feel free to add comments.
 
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  • Resign

    Resign

    Well-Known Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    I was raised in a Maronite family
    However Since i was kid i lacked the faith (contrary to everyone else in my family)
     
    Isabella

    Isabella

    The queen of "Bazella"
    Orange Room Supporter
    I was very religious growing up, participating in church and religious camps and the whole shebang. Gradually lost my faith over the years till I got to a point in which God became inconsequential to my life. It doesn't really matter to me whether he exists or not, I qualify myself as agnostic because I believe his existence is possible and the remnants of my religious upbringing still seep through from time to time in the form of scary shadows at night, mostly if there's a mirror in the room, that make me internally scream for God in horror :p
     
    !Aoune32

    !Aoune32

    Well-Known Member
    @Indie I believe in GOD. fakhour in my religion. i am partly practicising. i go to church on special occassions easter, christmas etc and i will place my children in a christian school. i try to get them to pray before going to sleep :) well my 2.5 year old girl anyway la2ano my boy is still young.
     
    Libnene Qu7

    Libnene Qu7

    Super Ultra Senior Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    I am agnostic/atheist, never was blessed with the gift of faith. Most of my family are partially practicing believers. I don't despise religions (except one, and easy to guess which one). I do despise religious zealots of any religion who think they have a monopoly on truth.
     
    Mrsrx

    Mrsrx

    Somehow a Member
    Staff member
    Agnostic ...was religious a bit when i was in catholic school until secondary school where I became less and less religious.

    Same as LQ7 nothing against religions but if it becomes a law where i have to abide by just as it is a religious idea and knowing its something i do not believe much in..it becomes a hassle on me on a personal level...basically live and let live approach i will not tell people what they can and cannot do as i do not want them to tell me how to live
     
    JustLeb

    JustLeb

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    KUFFAR ravaging the forum
    action should be taken :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
     
    Lebanon_not_Arabic

    Lebanon_not_Arabic

    Well-Known Member
    "Un peu de philosophie écarte de la religion et beaucoup y ramène." Rivarol

    "L'homme pieux et l'athée parlent toujours de religion : l'un parle de ce qu'il aime, et l'autre de ce qu'il craint." Montesquieu
     
    U

    unitedlb

    Well-Known Member
    I was raised as a Maronite Christian until I became an agnostic at the of age 17. I then underwent several years of thinking and exploring, moving back to partial faith at the age of 23. After more years of thinking and exploring, I returned to full faith six years ago at the age of 32. I have done all the thinking there is to do about this topic and have landed at "2.0" on the Dawkins Scale (i.e. I strongly believe in God's existence but fall short of 100%). I am Christian by belief and a Maronite in terms of culture and practice. Having said that, I have a great deal of respect for all other religions, atheism and of course my previous world of agnosticism.
     
    Iron Maiden

    Iron Maiden

    Paragon of Bacon
    Orange Room Supporter
    "Un peu de philosophie écarte de la religion et beaucoup y ramène." Rivarol

    "L'homme pieux et l'athée parlent toujours de religion : l'un parle de ce qu'il aime, et l'autre de ce qu'il craint." Montesquieu
    i’m sure rivarol didnt try philosiphying while holding a good tripel belgian beer :D
     
    Ice Tea

    Ice Tea

    Active Member
    I was raised Latin Catholic but I'm officially Melkite on papers, where I grew up there was no Melkite or Maronite Church. But I never felt I quite belonged in the Latin Church and became irreligious overtime (even tho always strongly culturally Christian). In Lebanon I would often go the Orthodox Church (both my grandmothers are Orthodox and I'm extremely close to my maternal one). I felt home there and that those were my people, but unfortunately that was not enough to restore my faith because as soon as I'd leave Lebanon I'd feel the same feeling of not belonging.

    Ever since I had the most amazing experience of my life of volunteering with Iraqi Christian refugees, I've been reconnecting with my faith. Despite being the most persecuted people in the world (alongside Copts), Assyrians never really lost their faith. Really, they are the most amazing, purest and generous people I've met in my life. They inspired me so much. I've been learning Aramaic and have been attending the Syriac Catholic and Chaldean Churchs for some time now. I've learned that as Middle Eastern Christians we're closer to each other than to anyone else. I feel at home with Copts, Assyrians/Chaldeans, Syrian Christians etc and consider ourselves to be one family.
     
    ّTelefon Kasse

    ّTelefon Kasse

    Member
    I was very religious growing up, participating in church and religious camps and the whole shebang. Gradually lost my faith over the years till I got to a point in which God became inconsequential to my life. It doesn't really matter to me whether he exists or not, I qualify myself as agnostic because I believe his existence is possible and the remnants of my religious upbringing still seep through from time to time in the form of scary shadows at night, mostly if there's a mirror in the room, that make me internally scream for God in horror :p
    I'll make sure you have more nightmares my child​
     
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