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Huawei: When reality hits home and Trump is America CEO.

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I left my heart in San Francisco and China wants it back in a New York State Of Mind


Who would have thought Socialism on top of Capitalism....

'Apple's my teacher:' Huawei CEO says he is against punishing Apple for Trump's 5G purge

'Apple's my teacher:' Huawei CEO says he is against punishing Apple for Trump's 5G purge


Huawei founder has said that US President Donald Trump's crackdown on the Chinese telecom giant is due to it being more advanced than its competitors, adding that he would not welcome a tit-for-tat against Apple.
Ren Zhengfei, founder and CEO of Huawei, told Bloomberg in an interview on Sunday that he would be strongly opposed to targeting Apple in a retaliation against Washington's onslaught on his own company, despite Apple being Huawei's main competitor in the smartphone market.
"Apple is my teacher, it advanced in front of us. As a student, why should I oppose my teacher? I would never do it," Ren said, adding that he doubts that Beijing would drag the US company into the ongoing trade row.
"That will not happen, first of all. And second of all, if that happens, I'll be the first to protest. Apple is the world's leading company. If there wasn't Apple, there would have been no mobile Internet," Ren said.
Chinese media have reported that local consumers have been ditching Apple iPhones in favor of domestically-built Huawei devices. Social media campaigns in support of Huawei reportedly cite the ongoing trade dispute while urging locals to stock up on Huawei products at Apple's expense.
At the same time, Ren dismissed the notion that Huawei's success is driven by technology theft from the US, arguing that "it's more likely that they steal our technology." Huawei's technological superiority is precisely the reason US President Donald Trump is going to such lengths to bar it from the market, Ren believes.
Huawei is the world's largest telecom equipment-maker and is trailing only Samsung in the smartphone market after taking over Apple as the second-biggest supplier last year – and its CEO is certain a company this big won't be sunk by American sanctions.
"If some companies do not want to work with us, it's like a hole in an airplane. We are working to fix the hole, but the airplane is still able to fly," Ren said, adding that Huawei would use more of its own chips instead of buying from the US.
In addition to targeting Huawei at home, the US has led a wide-ranging campaign to pressure its allies in Europe and Asia to ditch the Chinese company's 5G equipment citing allegations of spying. While some have fallen in line, most of Europe has been reluctant to cave in without hard proof.
"The US managers its own companies. The US is not the international police. They cannot manage the whole world," Ren said.
While China has not attempted to bring Apple into the trade feud with the US, Trump has repeatedly suggested using Huawei as bargaining chip.
For his part, Ren said he wants nothing to do with Trump and may even refuse to sell Huawei products to the US if it ever expresses a desire to buy.
"The US has never bought any products from us. Even if the US ever wants to buy our products in the future, I may not sell to them. There is no need for negotiation. I will ignore Trump – then, with whom can he negotiate? If he calls me, I may not answer."
 

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Till Trump do they part: Top tech firms cut ties with Huawei following US trade blacklisting
Till Trump do they part: Top tech firms cut ties with Huawei following US trade blacklisting



Google
The American multinational technology company was the first to suspend its licenses and product-sharing agreements with the blacklisted Chinese corporation. Google, focused on internet-related services and products, cut its business deals with Huawei that involve the transfer of hardware and software. Google’s steps unavoidably deprives Huawei of access to Android operating system updates with its upcoming smartphones to be shut out of some Google apps.
Intel, Qualcomm, Xilinx & Broadcom
The Silicon Valley chip makers froze their supplies to Huawei following the US government’s announcement. The companies reportedly have told their employees that no new shipments would be made “until further notice.”
Lumentum Holdings, which sells components to Huawei, announced plans to halt the deals with the Chinese firm. The company said that it was lowering its quarterly outlook since sales to Huawei totaled 18 percent of overall revenue in the latest quarter.
Panasonic
Japan's Panasonic has joined US firms in stepping away from Huawei in the wake of the ban. The corporation said it would stop supplying some components to the Chinese firm. Later, the company said it was scrutinizing whether its products break US restrictions on trading with Huawei, causing some confusion, as the latest claims contradict the previous ones.
Miсrosoft
The US technology company removed Huawei’s products from its retail stores as well as Azure Stack, one of its websites offering cloud gear. Miсrosoft may also cut ties with the Chinese corporation in the sphere of consumer electronics and B2B decisions.
Vodafone
The UK telecom group Vodafone announced plans to suspend pre-orders of Huawei 5G handsets due to an alleged security controversy involving the Chinese company. The step came shortly after British mobile network operator and internet service provider EE said it had “paused” the launch of Huawei's 5G phones.
SoftBank, KDDI and NTT
Japanese major mobile carriers SoftBank and KDDI announced plans to postpone sales of new Huawei smartphones. Another telecommunications company, NTT, said it would stop taking orders for the new Huawei handsets, despite previous pledges to launch a new high-end Huawei model in the summer.
Amazon Japan
The Japanese unit of the US e-commerce titan Amazon suspended direct online sales of Huawei products. The company still allows third-party vendors to sell devices, including smartphones, tablets and PCs produced by the Chinese company.
ARM
British chip designer ARM ordered its staff to suspend “all active contracts, support entitlements, and any pending engagements” with the Chinese tech firm.
 

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The art of trade war: Chinese firm bans workers from buying American goods & stateside travel

The art of trade war: Chinese firm bans workers from buying American goods & stateside travel
<img src="https://cdni.rt.com/files/2019.05/xxs/5ce68427fc7e9376548b459e.jpg" class="media__item " alt="The art of trade war: Chinese firm bans workers from buying American goods & stateside travel" />
 

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Mass exodus of US firms from China amid trade war won’t mean they’ll be coming home, survey shows

Mass exodus of US firms from China amid trade war won’t mean they’ll be coming home, survey shows
<img src="https://cdni.rt.com/files/2019.05/xxs/5ce52ceafc7e93054f8b45a9.jpg" class="media__item " alt="Mass exodus of US firms from China amid trade war won’t mean they’ll be coming home, survey shows" />
 

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Patriot games: Chinese dump iPhones & switch to domestic Huawei devices amid US crackdown

Patriot games: Chinese dump iPhones & switch to domestic Huawei devices amid US crackdown
<img src="https://cdni.rt.com/files/2019.05/xxs/5ce80746fc7e93316a8b457c.JPG" class="media__item " alt="Patriot games: Chinese dump iPhones & switch to domestic Huawei devices amid US crackdown" />
 

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Struggling to stay afloat in China: RT’s Boom Bust on rivals taking a bite out of Apple

 Struggling to stay afloat in China: RT’s Boom Bust on rivals taking a bite out of Apple
<img src="https://cdni.rt.com/files/2019.04/xxs/5ca4c40cdda4c82f738b45b8.JPG" class="media__item " alt=" Struggling to stay afloat in China: RT’s Boom Bust on rivals taking a bite out of Apple" />
 

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Huawei’s own operating system could be ready this year if cut off from US tech, top exec says

Huawei’s own operating system could be ready this year if cut off from US tech, top exec says
<img src="https://cdni.rt.com/files/2019.05/xxs/5ce66ef0fc7e9374548b456a.JPG" class="media__item " alt="Huawei’s own operating system could be ready this year if cut off from US tech, top exec says" />
 

proIsrael-nonIsraeli

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Mass exodus of US firms from China amid trade war won’t mean they’ll be coming home, survey shows

"Mass exodus of US firms from China amid trade war won’t mean they’ll be coming home, survey shows"
---
Even though some will we do not expect them to "come home" en masse.

Leaving China is good enough - zero-sum gain for USA and severe loss for China.

BTW, money still will be coming to US.
 

Viral

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"Mass exodus of US firms from China amid trade war won’t mean they’ll be coming home, survey shows"
---
Even though some will we do not expect them to "come home" en masse.

Leaving China is good enough - zero-sum gain for USA and severe loss for China.

BTW, money still will be coming to US.

Few days ago a US representative said China is an economic threat to America therefore it is a security threat.

How did Socialist China become an economic and technological thread to the leader and Master of Capitalism that brags about its Exceptionalism? Ironically, proud America is still in debt to that socialist country. Not to mention China has not yet made its anticipated move dumping the USD in favor of its own currency which will end the petrodollar hegemony and cripple the effectiveness of US economic sanctions once and for all.

May be Venezuela’s socialist system would work for its people after all if the US stops sabotaging it.

When the empire starts cheating its way out so bluntly because it can no longer win fairly and squarely the international game and threatens the World with its military might if the World doesn’t abide by its orders Nazi style, those are the signs that the Empire is in trouble.
 

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‘Don’t say we didn’t warn you’: A phrase from China signals the trade war could get even worse

The biggest Chinese newspaper explicitly warned the U.S. on Wednesday that China would cut off rare earth minerals as a countermeasure in the escalated trade battle, using an expression the publication has only used twice in history, both of which involved full-on wars.
“We advise the U.S. side not to underestimate the Chinese side’s ability to safeguard its development rights and interests. Don’t say we didn’t warn you!” the People’s Daily said in a commentary titled “United States, don’t underestimate China’s ability to strike back.” The publication is the official newspaper of the Communist Party of China.

GP: Xi Jinping china flags


The phrase “Don’t say we didn’t warn you” was only used two other times in history by the People’s Daily — in 1962 before China’s border war with India and ahead of the 1979 China-Vietnam War.
“Will rare earths become a counter weapon for China to hit back against the pressure the United States has put on for no reason at all? The answer is no mystery,” the paper said.

The trade conflict between the world’s two largest economies escalated quickly this month with both sides slapping tariffs on billions of dollars worth of each other’s goods. China’s threat to restrict rare earth mineral sales to the U.S. came after President Donald Trump blacklisted Chinese telecom giant Huawei, which led to many chipmakers and internet companies cutting ties with the company.
The speculation about China’s payback first surfaced when Chinese President Xi Jinping visited rare earth mining and processing facilities in Jiangxi province during a domestic tour last week. A Chinese official warned Tuesday that products made from the materials should not be used against China’s development, which was seen as a veiled threat aimed at the U.S. and its technology industry.
China’s rare earth materials are crucial to the production of iPhones, electric vehicles and advanced precision weapons, although the imports are a relatively small part of the $420 billion U.S. goods deficit with China.

The Chinese tabloid Global Times also said Tuesday that China can play the “rare earths card” and that it’s “seriously considering” the move.
The stock market took a big hit amid the tit-for-tat strategies between the U.S. and China, with stocks poised to post their first negative month of the year. The S&P 500 has lost nearly 6% this month.‘Don’t say we didn’t warn you’: A phrase from China signals the trade war could get even worse
 

HannaTheCrusader

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Mass exodus of US firms from China amid trade war won’t mean they’ll be coming home, survey shows

Mass exodus of US firms from China amid trade war won’t mean they’ll be coming home, survey shows
<img src="https://cdni.rt.com/files/2019.05/xxs/5ce52ceafc7e93054f8b45a9.jpg" class="media__item " alt="Mass exodus of US firms from China amid trade war won’t mean they’ll be coming home, survey shows" />


bro

trump wants them to relocate to

laos
vietnam
south korea
nigeria
chile

uae, yes uae for manufacturing
AND INDIA

and even North Korea ( if the kim gets sane)


and china fears that, as this will really impact them negatively
imagine of they lose 1/2 the usa markets to these nations


trump wants those friendly usa nations to benefit and thats good for the future of usa companies
as china has become too predatory and stealing a lot of technology

let the chinese try their hands at actually INVENTING SOMETHING
 

HannaTheCrusader

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Orange Room Supporter
. on Wednesday that China would cut off rare earth minerals as a countermeasure in the escalated trade battle, using an expression the publication has only used twice in history, both of which involved full-on wars.


usa can start its own mining production
china knows that very well

bla bla bla empty threats
let china keep digging tself with ITS NO UNO CUSTOMER


never seen in my life a company ( china co in this case) upsetting its major client
what a dumb move



Rare earth elements aren’t the secret weapon China thinks they are
50
Despite the name, rare earths just aren’t that rare
By James Vincent May 23, 2019, 12:04pm EDT
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Rare earth elements are described as the ‘vitamins of chemistry’ — producing powerful effects in small doses.
America’s trade war with China has been quietly escalating for years, but this week it took a turn for the disastrous. Huawei, once the rising star of China’s tech industry, has been cut offfrom US suppliers, leaving the company effectively stunted. China is likely to respond somehow, but with a multitude of options on the table, many in the tech industry are now considering nightmare scenarios.
RARE EARTH ELEMENTS ARE CRUCIAL FOR HIGH-TECH MANUFACTURING
One particularly chaotic option would be a ban on the export of rare earths — raw materials that are crucial for electronics. These elements are produced mostly in China, and used in the US for everything from electric cars to wind turbines, smartphones to missiles.
Chinese state media have backed the idea, calling America’s dependence on Chinese rare earths “an ace in Beijing’s hand.” President Xi Jinping hinted at that possibility when he visited a rare earth facility at the beginning of this week. (As a ministry spokesperson commented with what seemed like a nod and a wink: “It is normal that the top leader investigates relevant industrial policies. I hope everyone can interpret it correctly.”)
Rare earth elements are sometimes described as the “vitamins of chemistry,” as small doses produce powerful salutary effects. A sprinkle of cerium here and a pinch of neodymium there makes TV screens brighter, batteries last longer, and magnets stronger. If China suddenly shut off access to these materials, it would be like rewinding the tech industry back a few decades. And no one wants to ditch their iPhone and go back to a BlackBerry.
Experts in the field, though, are much less concerned about such a chilling scenario. They say that while a restriction on rare earth exports would have some immediate adverse effects, the US and the rest of the world would adapt in the long run. “If China really cuts off supply entirely then there are short term problems,” Tim Worstall, a former rare earth trader and commodities blogger tells The Verge. “But they’re solvable.”
Far from being an ace in the hole, it turns out rare earths are more of a busted flush.
China currently dominates the world’s supply of rare earth elements. Credit: USGS
The reasons for this are numerous, and span geography, chemistry, and history. But the most important factor is also the simplest to explain: rare earths just aren’t that rare.
A group of 17 elements, rare earths are what the USGS (United States Geological Survey) describe as “moderately abundant.” That means they’re not as common as oxygen, silicon, and iron, which make up the vast majority of the Earth’s crust, but some are on a par with elements like copper and lead, which we don’t consider exotic or scarce. Significant deposits exist in China, but also Brazil, Canada, Australia, India, and the United States.
The challenge with producing rare earths (and the reason they were given their name) is that they’re rarely found in concentrated lumps. These are chemically sociable elements, happy to bond with other compounds and minerals and tumble about in the dirt. This makes extracting rare earths from common earth like convincing a drunk friend to leave a raucous party: a lengthy and harrowing procedure.
“ONCE YOU TAKE IT OUT OF THE GROUND, THE BIG CHALLENGE IS CHEMISTRY NOT MINING.”
As Eugene Gholz, a rare earth expert and associate professor of political science at the University of Notre Dame puts it: “Once you take it out of the ground, the big challenge is chemistry not mining; converting the rare earths from rock to separated elements.”
Unlike convincing that drunk friend, though, this process involves a series of acid baths and unhealthy doses of radiation. This is one of the reasons that countries like the US have been more or less happy to cede production of rare earths to China. It’s a messy, dangerous business, so why not let someone else do it? Other factors also helped, including lower labor costs and the existence of Chinese mines that produce rare earths as a byproduct.
China’s sway in the rare earths market is a fairly recent state of affairs. Between the 1960s and the 1980s, the majority of the world’s supply was actually produced in America, from the Mountain Pass mine in California. The mine’s processing plant was shut down in 1998 after problems disposing of toxic waste water, and the whole site was mothballed in 2002.
It’s only from the 1990s onward that China has shouldered the bulk of production, along with the associated environmental costs. (In 2010, the Chinese government estimated that the industry was producing 22.05 million tons of toxic waste each year.) An oft-referenced figure is that China now produces some 95 percent of the world’s rare earths, but Gholz says this statistic is “wildly out of date.” The USGS pegs China’s part as closer to 80 percent.
China’s Consumption Of Coal Steadily On The Rise
Low labor costs and lax environmental regulations precipitated China’s rise in rare earth mining. Photo by China Photos/Getty Images
That’s still a substantial chunk of the world’s supply, though, and with no doubt that these are important commodities, the question is: what happens if China does cut off the US?
Luckily, we have a very good idea of what would happen next because it’s already happened before. Back in 2010, China stopped exports of rare earths to Japan following a diplomatic incident involving a fishing trawler and the disputed Senkaku Islands. Gholz wrote a report of the fallout from this incident in 2014, and found that despite China’s intentions, its ban actually had little effect.
Chinese smugglers continued to export rare earths off the books; manufacturers in Japan found ways to use less of the materials; and production in other parts of the world ramped up to compensate. “The world is flexible,” says Gholz. “When you try to restrict supplies to politically influence another country, people don’t give up, they adapt.”
He says that although his report examined the rare earth industry as it was in 2010, the “conclusions are pretty much the same” in 2019.
If China did turn off the rare earth tap, there would be enough private and public stockpiles to supply essential sectors like the military in the short term. And while an embargo could lead to price rises for high-tech goods and dependent materials like oil (rare earths are essential in many refining processes), Gholz says it’s highly unlikely that you would be unable to buy your next smartphone because of a few missing micrograms of yttrium. “I don’t think that’s ever going to happen. It just doesn’t seem plausible,” he says.
Even though a ban on rare earth exports is just speculation at this point, companies have begun to preempt any new Chinese restrictions. American chemical firm Blue Line Corp and Australian rare earth miner Lynas have already proposed new production facilities in the US, and rare earth stocks around the world have surged in response to the threat.
“IT’S NOT LIKE STARTING FROM SCRATCH.”
In the event of a ban, one of the most important backstops would be America’s Mountain Pass mine. Although the mine was closed after Chinese rare earths drove down prices, the facility is intact and resumed production last January. Recent estimates suggest it’s already supplying one-tenth of the world’s rare earth ores (though not their processing), and in the event of an embargo, it would be possible to bring Mountain Pass back up to speed.
“By far the cheapest and fastest way to bring more material into the market — if there was a disruption — is just sitting there in California,” says Gholz. “It’s not like starting from scratch.”
Worstall agrees: “Producing rare earth concentrate is near trivially simple,” he says. “I, or any other competent person, could produce that from a standing start within six months in any volume required.”
The kicker, both say, is how much that process might cost. Especially as any refining and separation plants built in the US would have to meet far higher environmental standards.
As we’re seeing with Huawei and other casualties of Trump’s trade war, the real question isn’t whether adaptation is possible in the future, it’s how much pain you can stomach in the present.
 

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I'm still hoping for someone here to enlighten us about a situation that defeats the laws Capitalist economics.
How in the hell can a Socialist giant like China be an economic threat to Capitalist giant like the US?
Are we not under the impression socialism collapses on its own weight? LOL...
 
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