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Huawei: When reality hits home and Trump is America CEO.

proIsrael-nonIsraeli

Legendary Member
"Mexico's crackdown on migrants sends some heading south"


And they say Trump's tariffs cannot work and would not work.
 

HannaTheCrusader

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
Huawei CEO Ren Zhengfei said Monday that President Donald Trump’s decision to target his company left the telecommunications giant reeling with few business options outside of China.

Trump’s ban against Huawei will cost the company $30 billion in revenue, according to Ren. His comments are startling given past remarks from company executives who suggested Huawei was technologically self-sufficient and will absorb the blows.

“We did not expect they would attack us on so many aspects,” Ren said, speaking at the company’s Shenzhen headquarters Monday. (RELATED: Trump Moves To Ban Technologies From Foreign Countries Deemed Security Threats)

US President Donald Trump returns to the White House on March 24, 2019 in Washington, DC after spending the weekend in Florida. Trump declared he had been completely exonerated after his campaign was cleared of colluding with Russia in the 2016 election campaign. (ERIC BARADAT/AFP/Getty Images)

US President Donald Trump returns to the White House on March 24, 2019 in Washington, DC after spending the weekend in Florida. (ERIC BARADAT/AFP/Getty Images)
He added: “We cannot get components supply, cannot participate in many international organizations, cannot work closely with many universities, cannot use anything with U.S. components, and cannot even establish connection with networks that use such components.”

Trump signed an executive order in May that would effectively ban certain types of technologies from foreign countries deemed a national security threat to the U.S. The president’s administration is also applying pressure on Britain and others to shy away from using Huawei to build out its fifth generation network.

The U.S. put Huawei on an export blacklist citing national security issues as well, barring American suppliers from selling to the world’s largest telecommunications equipment maker and number two maker of smartphones, without special approval. American tech companies are moving production out of China.

Google, for one, is reportedly shifting production of server hardware out of the communist nation and moving motherboards to Taiwan, as the company tries to avert pain from a 25% tariff. Other big tech companies are reportedly following suit and shifting production out of China and back to the U.S.





THEY ARE ****ED basically
 
Last edited:

Abou Sandal

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
THEY ARE ****ED basically

If making 100 Billion Dollars in revenues per year, over the next two years, instead of 130, means that...Yeah, why not.

Meanwhile, the American consumer is seeing his purchasing power diminishing due to Trumps (Socialist?) Tariffs, and US businesses are crying out loud to stop this madness.


Businesses Plead to Stop More China Tariffs. They Expect to Be Ignored.

Consumer products like toys, shoes, watches and jewelry are among the items that would face a 25 percent tax if President Trump’s next round of tariffs goes into effect. Companies warn that could raise prices on American consumers.

CreditJohn Ehlke/West Bend Daily News, via Associated Press


By Ana Swanson
  • June 17, 2019
WASHINGTON — Nervous business owners are spending seven days trying to persuade the Trump administration not to impose tariffs on an additional $300 billion worth of Chinese goods. Most are bracing for disappointment.

After several previous hearings where company officials testified against tariffs only to see them go into effect, many business leaders are becoming resigned to the idea that President Trump will do what he wants, regardless of their concerns.

The Trump administration says tariffs are necessary to change China’s longstanding practices of violating international trading rules and forcing American companies to hand over valuable technology.

While the two countries had been working toward a trade deal to resolve the administration’s concerns, those discussions fell apartlast month. Mr. Trump, who is expected to meet with President Xi Jinping of China this month in Japan, has since escalated his trade war, raising tariffs on $200 billion worth of imports and threatening 25 percent tariffs on an additional $300 billion worth.


Toymakers, telecom officials, port workers and shoemakers kicked off a seven-day hearing in Washington on Monday warning that Mr. Trump’s plan to impose tariffs on nearly all Chinese imports would raise costs for consumers, disrupt supply chains and potentially force them to lay off employees or go out of business.

For some, this was a repeat appearance before Trump administration officials, having testified previously about the effects of Mr. Trump’s first and second rounds of tariffs on $250 billion worth of Chinese goods. While many said they were holding out hope for a solution to the next round of levies, they sounded increasingly desperate and exasperated with the protracted trade war.

Rebecca Mond, a lobbyist for the toy industry, clutched an 18-inch bright yellow plush toy of the Pokémon character Pikachu. Like 85 percent of the toys sold in the United States, the stuffed animal was made in China, she said, and could cost 25 percent more as early as next month if the new tariffs go into effect.

“This guy is not a national security threat,” Ms. Mond said, gesturing to the Pikachu. She said the mood of the toymakers she was representing was “not optimistic” because the pain from tariffs would be so sharp for the industry. The tariffs are expected to hit just as companies begin stocking up products for the back-to-school and holiday shopping seasons.

With its earlier tariffs, the Trump administration had tried to shield consumers and target more advanced goods that China is seeking to dominate, like driverless cars, planes and advanced medical devices.

But as the president has announced tariffs first on $50 billion of goods from China, then an additional $200 billion of goods and now potentially the remaining roughly $300 billion of products China ships to the United States, consumer goods have increasingly crept into the mix. The latest tranche of goods subject to tariffs would include shoes, toys, jewelry, mobile phones and many other items Americans find in their shopping carts and under their Christmas trees.

“Folks are nervous,” said Jonathan Gold, a vice president of the National Retail Federation, which lobbies for companies like Sam’s Club, Macy’s and Modell’s Sporting Goods. “There is a lot of uncertainty. Are we going to have tariffs on China? Are we going to have tariffs on Mexico? Tariffs elsewhere?”

“This is all kind of a circus,” said Jean Kolloff, the president of Quinn Apparel, which makes clothes and cashmere sweaters in China. While she is holding out hope that more tariffs will not be imposed, she said her partners in China were “working around the clock” to try to ship their goods to the United States before they would go into effect.

Administration officials have said Mr. Trump will decide whether to impose the new tariffs after he talks with Mr. Xi at a summit meeting of the Group of 20 industrialized nations in Osaka, Japan. But officials have been playing down the prospect of securing a deal at the meeting, and it remains unclear what would persuade Mr. Trump not to proceed with the tariffs.



Rebecca Mond, a lobbyist for the toy industry, told the Office of the United States Trade Representative at the hearing on Monday that a plush Pikachu made in China “is not a national security threat.”CreditAna Swanson/The New York Times


American officials have accused China of reneging on a prospective trade deal and insist that it must return to that deal. The two sides also have other areas of disagreement, including when — and whether — all of Mr. Trump’s existing tariffs would be removed.
“We’re going to find out pretty soon in Osaka whether the two governments are committed to getting this relationship back on track, because right now the relationship is off track and heading in the wrong direction,” said Myron Brilliant, the executive vice president and head of international affairs at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

The prospect of long-run tariffs on China, an important source of products and a significant market for many American products, has companies scrambling. Mr. Trump, who has presented himself as an ally to business, has discounted their concerns about the trade war.

The president has maintained that if companies like Apple and Harley-Davidson do not like tariffs, they should move their operations back to the United States. Businesses have argued that to compete in a global economy, they must source products from abroad and sell them globally.

“The ancien régime likes to defend what it has,” Larry Kudlow, a top White House economic adviser, said in remarks at the Peterson Institute for International Economics last week, as he accused the Chamber of Commerce, the nation’s largest business group, of “ankle biting.”

“You either want change or you don’t,” Mr. Kudlow said.

Mr. Brilliant, along with many corporate officials testifying this week, said his organization supported Mr. Trump’s goal of addressing China’s unfair trade practices.

“But we’ve also been clearheaded that tariffs are a tax on American consumers, they are hurting American businesses, and are creating a great deal of uncertainty, not just in the bilateral economic relationship but in global economic growth,” he said.

Several officials testified that their companies had moved to China because it was the best and cheapest place to produce goods, and that they had no way to relocate such manufacturing back to the United States.

Mark Corrado, the president of Leading Lady, which makes women’s underwear, dangled a brassiere as he testified before a panel of government officials. “It’s a very difficult garment to make, and it takes a lot of precision to make it as well as they make it in China,” he said, pointing to the lace, the elastic shoulder straps and the metal hooks.

Decades ago, his company had five factories in the United States. But it gradually moved operations to Central America, and then to China. Now, Americans have lost that expertise, he said.

“Most women in the rural areas grew up sewing,” Mr. Corrado said. “That situation has totally changed.”

Bradley Mattarocci, the vice president of Baby Trend, which makes strollers, high chairs, car seats and other baby products for Walmart, Target and other stores, had come to Washington to testify against a previous round of tariffs last year. He was relieved to have some of his products receive an exemption — and then alarmed when he saw them reappear on the tariff list this year.

“It’s a yo-yo,” Mr. Mattarocci said. “How do you plan?”

His company makes all its products in China, except one — a diaper pail made in California. When Mr. Trump threatened tariffs on China, his company looked into moving production to Vietnam instead, but said that the shift would take at least two years and that the product would cost more to make.

Mr. Mattarocci said factories in Vietnam had raised prices in response to a rush from companies seeking to export to America. “Everybody around the world knows we’re all out looking for somewhere else other than China,” he said, “so they’re taking advantage of it.”

 

Abou Sandal

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
"Mexico's crackdown on migrants sends some heading south"


And they say Trump's tariffs cannot work and would not work.

Funny...
 

Abou Sandal

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
A predictable road ahead....


China Is Cutting Tariffs—For Everyone Else
As Trump focuses on disruption, Beijing is evidently operating on a higher level.

Chad P. Bown
Senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics


BRIAN SNYDER / REUTERS


Lobster is Maine’s top export. Like many Americans with something to sell, Maine’s trappers benefited from positive turns in China’s economic development. The movement of tens of millions of people out of poverty and into the middle class increased demand for a source of protein—and a Chinese New Year delicacy—that Maine could happily provide.

Yet in the wake of President Donald Trump’s trade war, American lobster sales to China have decreased by 70 percent. China’s 25 percent retaliatory tariff on American lobster was only the start. Beijing has actively helped Chinese grocers and restaurants by also reducing the costs of their finding new, non-American suppliers. It has cut the Chinese tariff on lobster bought from Canada, Maine’s fierce rival in the lobster business. As a result, Canada has seen its lobster exports to China nearly double. Maine may never recover its previously dominant position in this export market.

This story is not singular. Trump started the trade war by levying new taxes on $250 billion worth of Chinese exports. China retaliated both by increasing the duties Americans face and by decreasing the tariffs that confront everyone else: It has cut tariffs on thousands of products from the rest of the world’s fisheries, farmers, and firms.

Even as Tariff Man, as Trump likes to refer to himself, focuses only on disruption, Beijing is evidently operating on a higher level. China is outplaying the United States on two fronts.

First, while Trump is on the verge of slapping tariffs on almost everything the U.S. imports from China, Beijing is picking and choosing wisely. It went to town on American soybeans, in part because it knew that Brazil and Argentina could provide ample alternative supplies. But it has left untouched other American exports that are more difficult to replace. China could, for instance, force its state-owned airlines to immediately shift from buying Boeing to European-based Airbus, but those companies would run into trouble accessing the parts and services needed to keep their costly existing fleets running. Beijing has therefore mostly spared the aircraft sector from retaliation thus far.


Second, Trump has no real mitigation strategy to help the Americans facing the entirely foreseeable costs of his policies. Yes, he’s giving out tens of billions of dollars in agricultural subsidies—but that is, of course, a cost borne by Americans, not international rivals. His separate trade restrictions on nearly $50 billion in steel and aluminum imports have only worsened the effects of his fight with China; these restrictions have burdened American farmers by raising the cost of the equipment needed for harvesting or storing the crops they are now unable to sell abroad. And he’s compounding this short-term pain with possible long-term damage to previously healthy international relationships: Those steel and aluminum tariffs have mostly targeted trade from allies such as Europe, Canada, and Japan—not China. He also conducted a needlessly contentious renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement, and has threatened tariffs on tens of billions of dollars’ worth of Japanese and European cars.


By contrast, China is helping its citizens by making new friends. One way to offset the rising prices to Chinese consumers otherwise stuck buying American is to lower their costs if they switch. On average, it is now 14 percent cheaper in China to buy something from Canada, Japan, Brazil, or Europe than it is to buy something from the United States. Beijing is making it worthwhile for its consumers to develop new commercial relationships. And once those new ties are formed, the Chinese may not bother to switch back.

When Trump first began imposing tariffs in early 2018, his key trade strategist, Peter Navarro, infamously said, “I don’t believe any country in the world is going to retaliate.” Navarro was wrong, of course, as foes (China, Russia) and friends (European Union, Canada, Mexico) alike all immediately retaliated against American exports.

More worrisome than Navarro’s rhetoric was how it revealed a fundamental misunderstanding of how trade works. In each of its provocations, Trump’s team sees trade through the narrow lens of a two-country world: America versus whomever the administration has chosen to antagonize that day.

America can easily lose even when there is no retaliation at all. Anytime another country lowers its tariff to someone else—but not the United States—the global economy leaves America one step further behind.

Trump chose this outcome once when he pulled out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement in January 2017. The result is that ranchers in Australia, New Zealand, and Canada now have access to the lucrative Japanese beef market and Americans do not. Beijing’s positive overtures toward America’s former economic allies suggest Trump’s unilateral approach toward China is likely to replay itself.

Lobster may be the canary in Trump’s trade-war coal mine. Maine’s congressional delegation—made up of two Democrats, one independent, and one Republican—has shined a spotlight on the industry’s hard times by requesting that the Trump administration provide it with the same sort of federal assistance already doled out to farmers.

Trump keeps pushing the rest of the world away and into China’s corner. China is enticing the world to stay.

 

HannaTheCrusader

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
If making 100 Billion Dollars in revenues per year, over the next two years, instead of 130, means that...Yeah, why not.

Meanwhile, the American consumer is seeing his purchasing power diminishing due to Trumps (Socialist?) Tariffs, and US businesses are crying out loud to stop this madness.


Businesses Plead to Stop More China Tariffs. They Expect to Be Ignored.

Consumer products like toys, shoes, watches and jewelry are among the items that would face a 25 percent tax if President Trump’s next round of tariffs goes into effect. Companies warn that could raise prices on American consumers.

CreditJohn Ehlke/West Bend Daily News, via Associated Press


By Ana Swanson
  • June 17, 2019
WASHINGTON — Nervous business owners are spending seven days trying to persuade the Trump administration not to impose tariffs on an additional $300 billion worth of Chinese goods. Most are bracing for disappointment.

After several previous hearings where company officials testified against tariffs only to see them go into effect, many business leaders are becoming resigned to the idea that President Trump will do what he wants, regardless of their concerns.

The Trump administration says tariffs are necessary to change China’s longstanding practices of violating international trading rules and forcing American companies to hand over valuable technology.

While the two countries had been working toward a trade deal to resolve the administration’s concerns, those discussions fell apartlast month. Mr. Trump, who is expected to meet with President Xi Jinping of China this month in Japan, has since escalated his trade war, raising tariffs on $200 billion worth of imports and threatening 25 percent tariffs on an additional $300 billion worth.


Toymakers, telecom officials, port workers and shoemakers kicked off a seven-day hearing in Washington on Monday warning that Mr. Trump’s plan to impose tariffs on nearly all Chinese imports would raise costs for consumers, disrupt supply chains and potentially force them to lay off employees or go out of business.

For some, this was a repeat appearance before Trump administration officials, having testified previously about the effects of Mr. Trump’s first and second rounds of tariffs on $250 billion worth of Chinese goods. While many said they were holding out hope for a solution to the next round of levies, they sounded increasingly desperate and exasperated with the protracted trade war.

Rebecca Mond, a lobbyist for the toy industry, clutched an 18-inch bright yellow plush toy of the Pokémon character Pikachu. Like 85 percent of the toys sold in the United States, the stuffed animal was made in China, she said, and could cost 25 percent more as early as next month if the new tariffs go into effect.

“This guy is not a national security threat,” Ms. Mond said, gesturing to the Pikachu. She said the mood of the toymakers she was representing was “not optimistic” because the pain from tariffs would be so sharp for the industry. The tariffs are expected to hit just as companies begin stocking up products for the back-to-school and holiday shopping seasons.

With its earlier tariffs, the Trump administration had tried to shield consumers and target more advanced goods that China is seeking to dominate, like driverless cars, planes and advanced medical devices.

But as the president has announced tariffs first on $50 billion of goods from China, then an additional $200 billion of goods and now potentially the remaining roughly $300 billion of products China ships to the United States, consumer goods have increasingly crept into the mix. The latest tranche of goods subject to tariffs would include shoes, toys, jewelry, mobile phones and many other items Americans find in their shopping carts and under their Christmas trees.

“Folks are nervous,” said Jonathan Gold, a vice president of the National Retail Federation, which lobbies for companies like Sam’s Club, Macy’s and Modell’s Sporting Goods. “There is a lot of uncertainty. Are we going to have tariffs on China? Are we going to have tariffs on Mexico? Tariffs elsewhere?”

“This is all kind of a circus,” said Jean Kolloff, the president of Quinn Apparel, which makes clothes and cashmere sweaters in China. While she is holding out hope that more tariffs will not be imposed, she said her partners in China were “working around the clock” to try to ship their goods to the United States before they would go into effect.

Administration officials have said Mr. Trump will decide whether to impose the new tariffs after he talks with Mr. Xi at a summit meeting of the Group of 20 industrialized nations in Osaka, Japan. But officials have been playing down the prospect of securing a deal at the meeting, and it remains unclear what would persuade Mr. Trump not to proceed with the tariffs.



Rebecca Mond, a lobbyist for the toy industry, told the Office of the United States Trade Representative at the hearing on Monday that a plush Pikachu made in China “is not a national security threat.”CreditAna Swanson/The New York Times


American officials have accused China of reneging on a prospective trade deal and insist that it must return to that deal. The two sides also have other areas of disagreement, including when — and whether — all of Mr. Trump’s existing tariffs would be removed.
“We’re going to find out pretty soon in Osaka whether the two governments are committed to getting this relationship back on track, because right now the relationship is off track and heading in the wrong direction,” said Myron Brilliant, the executive vice president and head of international affairs at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

The prospect of long-run tariffs on China, an important source of products and a significant market for many American products, has companies scrambling. Mr. Trump, who has presented himself as an ally to business, has discounted their concerns about the trade war.

The president has maintained that if companies like Apple and Harley-Davidson do not like tariffs, they should move their operations back to the United States. Businesses have argued that to compete in a global economy, they must source products from abroad and sell them globally.

“The ancien régime likes to defend what it has,” Larry Kudlow, a top White House economic adviser, said in remarks at the Peterson Institute for International Economics last week, as he accused the Chamber of Commerce, the nation’s largest business group, of “ankle biting.”

“You either want change or you don’t,” Mr. Kudlow said.

Mr. Brilliant, along with many corporate officials testifying this week, said his organization supported Mr. Trump’s goal of addressing China’s unfair trade practices.

“But we’ve also been clearheaded that tariffs are a tax on American consumers, they are hurting American businesses, and are creating a great deal of uncertainty, not just in the bilateral economic relationship but in global economic growth,” he said.

Several officials testified that their companies had moved to China because it was the best and cheapest place to produce goods, and that they had no way to relocate such manufacturing back to the United States.

Mark Corrado, the president of Leading Lady, which makes women’s underwear, dangled a brassiere as he testified before a panel of government officials. “It’s a very difficult garment to make, and it takes a lot of precision to make it as well as they make it in China,” he said, pointing to the lace, the elastic shoulder straps and the metal hooks.

Decades ago, his company had five factories in the United States. But it gradually moved operations to Central America, and then to China. Now, Americans have lost that expertise, he said.

“Most women in the rural areas grew up sewing,” Mr. Corrado said. “That situation has totally changed.”

Bradley Mattarocci, the vice president of Baby Trend, which makes strollers, high chairs, car seats and other baby products for Walmart, Target and other stores, had come to Washington to testify against a previous round of tariffs last year. He was relieved to have some of his products receive an exemption — and then alarmed when he saw them reappear on the tariff list this year.

“It’s a yo-yo,” Mr. Mattarocci said. “How do you plan?”

His company makes all its products in China, except one — a diaper pail made in California. When Mr. Trump threatened tariffs on China, his company looked into moving production to Vietnam instead, but said that the shift would take at least two years and that the product would cost more to make.

Mr. Mattarocci said factories in Vietnam had raised prices in response to a rush from companies seeking to export to America. “Everybody around the world knows we’re all out looking for somewhere else other than China,” he said, “so they’re taking advantage of it.”


read it again

he can always make his money in china ..good luck


Huawei CEO Ren Zhengfei said Monday that President Donald Trump’s decision to target his company left the telecommunications giant reeling
with few business options outside of China.
 

HannaTheCrusader

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
A predictable road ahead....


China Is Cutting Tariffs—For Everyone Else
As Trump focuses on disruption, Beijing is evidently operating on a higher level.

Chad P. Bown
Senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics


BRIAN SNYDER / REUTERS


Lobster is Maine’s top export. Like many Americans with something to sell, Maine’s trappers benefited from positive turns in China’s economic development. The movement of tens of millions of people out of poverty and into the middle class increased demand for a source of protein—and a Chinese New Year delicacy—that Maine could happily provide.

Yet in the wake of President Donald Trump’s trade war, American lobster sales to China have decreased by 70 percent. China’s 25 percent retaliatory tariff on American lobster was only the start. Beijing has actively helped Chinese grocers and restaurants by also reducing the costs of their finding new, non-American suppliers. It has cut the Chinese tariff on lobster bought from Canada, Maine’s fierce rival in the lobster business. As a result, Canada has seen its lobster exports to China nearly double. Maine may never recover its previously dominant position in this export market.

This story is not singular. Trump started the trade war by levying new taxes on $250 billion worth of Chinese exports. China retaliated both by increasing the duties Americans face and by decreasing the tariffs that confront everyone else: It has cut tariffs on thousands of products from the rest of the world’s fisheries, farmers, and firms.

Even as Tariff Man, as Trump likes to refer to himself, focuses only on disruption, Beijing is evidently operating on a higher level. China is outplaying the United States on two fronts.

First, while Trump is on the verge of slapping tariffs on almost everything the U.S. imports from China, Beijing is picking and choosing wisely. It went to town on American soybeans, in part because it knew that Brazil and Argentina could provide ample alternative supplies. But it has left untouched other American exports that are more difficult to replace. China could, for instance, force its state-owned airlines to immediately shift from buying Boeing to European-based Airbus, but those companies would run into trouble accessing the parts and services needed to keep their costly existing fleets running. Beijing has therefore mostly spared the aircraft sector from retaliation thus far.


Second, Trump has no real mitigation strategy to help the Americans facing the entirely foreseeable costs of his policies. Yes, he’s giving out tens of billions of dollars in agricultural subsidies—but that is, of course, a cost borne by Americans, not international rivals. His separate trade restrictions on nearly $50 billion in steel and aluminum imports have only worsened the effects of his fight with China; these restrictions have burdened American farmers by raising the cost of the equipment needed for harvesting or storing the crops they are now unable to sell abroad. And he’s compounding this short-term pain with possible long-term damage to previously healthy international relationships: Those steel and aluminum tariffs have mostly targeted trade from allies such as Europe, Canada, and Japan—not China. He also conducted a needlessly contentious renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement, and has threatened tariffs on tens of billions of dollars’ worth of Japanese and European cars.


By contrast, China is helping its citizens by making new friends. One way to offset the rising prices to Chinese consumers otherwise stuck buying American is to lower their costs if they switch. On average, it is now 14 percent cheaper in China to buy something from Canada, Japan, Brazil, or Europe than it is to buy something from the United States. Beijing is making it worthwhile for its consumers to develop new commercial relationships. And once those new ties are formed, the Chinese may not bother to switch back.

When Trump first began imposing tariffs in early 2018, his key trade strategist, Peter Navarro, infamously said, “I don’t believe any country in the world is going to retaliate.” Navarro was wrong, of course, as foes (China, Russia) and friends (European Union, Canada, Mexico) alike all immediately retaliated against American exports.

More worrisome than Navarro’s rhetoric was how it revealed a fundamental misunderstanding of how trade works. In each of its provocations, Trump’s team sees trade through the narrow lens of a two-country world: America versus whomever the administration has chosen to antagonize that day.

America can easily lose even when there is no retaliation at all. Anytime another country lowers its tariff to someone else—but not the United States—the global economy leaves America one step further behind.

Trump chose this outcome once when he pulled out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement in January 2017. The result is that ranchers in Australia, New Zealand, and Canada now have access to the lucrative Japanese beef market and Americans do not. Beijing’s positive overtures toward America’s former economic allies suggest Trump’s unilateral approach toward China is likely to replay itself.

Lobster may be the canary in Trump’s trade-war coal mine. Maine’s congressional delegation—made up of two Democrats, one independent, and one Republican—has shined a spotlight on the industry’s hard times by requesting that the Trump administration provide it with the same sort of federal assistance already doled out to farmers.

Trump keeps pushing the rest of the world away and into China’s corner. China is enticing the world to stay.


food items such as soybean, lobster are finite in production

they cant by pass usa producers as hard as they try

eventually canada will run our of lobster, or usa will find other markets ( that used to be supplied by canada)

china has no leverage over usa

as for subsidies, usa always subsidized its farmers, actually it even pays them not to plant crops in some cases

CHINA HAS NO CHOICE BUT TO MAKE A DEAL WITH TRUMP.,as much as they might hate that, they have no other choice


TELL ME WHO WILL BY ( outside china) A HUAWEI PHONE IF THEY CANT ACCESS YOUTUBE, FACEBOOK, WHATSAPP, GOOGLE

will you buy such a phone now ?? TELL ME WILL YOU
 

HannaTheCrusader

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
Trump chose this outcome once when he pulled out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement in January 2017. The result is that ranchers in Australia, New Zealand, and Canada now have access to the lucrative Japanese beef market and Americans do not. Beijing’s positive overtures toward America’s former economic allies suggest Trump’s unilateral approach toward China is likely to replay itself.


just to show you that this article if full of lies , deceits and falsehood
janpan will buy more usa beef and even agreed to end some restrictions
my advice, stop reading fantasy articles , written by the looney left


American beef sales to Japan topped $2 billion in 2018, representing approximately one-fourth of all U.S. beef exports. The U.S. Meat Export Federation estimates that expanded access without the age restrictions could increase U.S. beef sales to Japan7% to 10%, or by $150 million to $200 million annually.

United States beef imports in Japan - Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_beef_imports_in_Japan




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Japan ends longstanding trade restrictions on American beef: USDA

https://www.cnbc.com/.../japan-ends-longstanding-trade-restrictions-on-american-beef...

May 17, 2019 - Japan has agreed to lift longstanding restrictions on American beef exports, clearing the way for U.S. products to enter the market regardless of ...
 

Abou Sandal

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
read it again

he can always make his money in china ..good luck


Huawei CEO Ren Zhengfei said Monday that President Donald Trump’s decision to target his company left the telecommunications giant reeling with few business options outside of China.

You are reading it upside down :lol:

Few options of what Hanna? Few options of what, exactly? Did you even ask yourself what he could be talking about or did you just chose to skip that part and concentrate on the "outside China" part, then chose to understand it as if Huawei lost its markets outside China?

Let me make it clear for you. The guy is telling the US and his former components sources "Sorry guys, but it seems that we will have to make our own components from now on, since we will not be able to buy them from you."

Translation: That's a very very bad news for Google, Intel, ARM,...Since from now on, they will have a competition they need to cope with.


food items such as soybean, lobster are finite in production

they cant by pass usa producers as hard as they try

eventually canada will run our of lobster, or usa will find other markets ( that used to be supplied by canada)

Seriously? That's a huge twist to entertain a wishful thinking if you ask me. Meanwhile, you're losing markets.
Translation: That's bad news.

Good luck with that.


china has no leverage over usa

Who cares? That's not the problem discussed here.

as for subsidies, usa always subsidized its farmers, actually it even pays them not to plant crops in some cases

Yeah I know. The US has always acted like a typical socialist and sometimes communist regime in that field.
But now it gets even more creepy.
Now the US imposes taxes on its citizens, which hurt its own economy, so it pays back what it took from its own citizens, to help the others who were hurt by its actions, stay alive breathe a little more.

And some people see that as a win! lol

CHINA HAS NO CHOICE BUT TO MAKE A DEAL WITH TRUMP.,as much as they might hate that, they have no other choice

First of all, let me clear a FACT for you: China IS THE ONE asking for a deal, and Trump IS THE ONE waging a war. Not the other way.
Second, China has multiple choices. There is a whole Planet outside of America.
Third, China is asking from the start for a fair deal, and they will NEVER sign a deal with anyone, UNLESS it's a FAIR deal (At least to them, because they would never want to stop Trump from picking a bad deal for America, which is a likely scenario)
Fourth, China will get its fair deal sooner or later.

TELL ME WHO WILL BY ( outside china) A HUAWEI PHONE IF THEY CANT ACCESS YOUTUBE, FACEBOOK, WHATSAPP, GOOGLE
will you buy such a phone now ?? TELL ME WILL YOU

Who told you that you cannot have access to those if you buy a Huawei phone? Seriously? Where do you even come up with this stuff from?

And just on the side here,
Who still wants facebook to start with...lol
And Whatsapp?...Yeah it's a great app...But so is WeChat that people all over the World are using now
And others have big contenders too, by the way...Google maps included!

Now let me ask you a question:

If you are given a choice between an Iphone or Samsung, and a Huawei that has an operating system that is faster than Android, faster than Mac OS, that has better camera, faster processor, 5G, and access to almost all apps you can think of, yet that is cheaper...Which phone would you buy?

You tell me now...hehe

just to show you that this article if full of lies , deceits and falsehood
janpan will buy more usa beef and even agreed to end some restrictions
my advice, stop reading fantasy articles , written by the looney left


American beef sales to Japan topped $2 billion in 2018, representing approximately one-fourth of all U.S. beef exports. The U.S. Meat Export Federation estimates that expanded access without the age restrictions could increase U.S. beef sales to Japan7% to 10%, or by $150 million to $200 million annually.
United States beef imports in Japan - Wikipedia
United States beef imports in Japan - Wikipedia

Web results
Japan ends longstanding trade restrictions on American beef: USDA
https://www.cnbc.com/.../japan-ends-longstanding-trade-restrictions-on-american-beef...

May 17, 2019 - Japan has agreed to lift longstanding restrictions on American beef exports, clearing the way for U.S. products to enter the market regardless of ...


You're again reading it upside down. (Oh and stop that "leftist" smear argument. "Trumpists" have become just like those leftists we all reject, sometimes even worse than than the worst LGBTQXYZ nut job activists, looking like different sides of the same coin now.)

First of all, Japan has just agreed to lift some restrictions on American beef. It's fresh news.
Second, beef sales "are expected" to increase. (Yeah that's of course unless Trump turns full retard on Japan all of the sudden and for example, decides to build a wall around it, who knows...)

Third, and that's the most important part, this part of the article wasn't about what Japan buys from America in terms of beefs! It's about what Australia, New Zealand, and Canada buy from the US!

Which is now reduced thanks to Trump, since by dropping the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement in January 2017, he made Japanese beef cheaper for these markets!

Good Job Trump!

MAGA! (Make Asia Great Again) :lol:
 

HannaTheCrusader

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
You are reading it upside down :lol:

Few options of what Hanna? Few options of what, exactly? Did you even ask yourself what he could be talking about or did you just chose to skip that part and concentrate on the "outside China" part, then chose to understand it as if Huawei lost its markets outside China?

Let me make it clear for you. The guy is telling the US and his former components sources "Sorry guys, but it seems that we will have to make our own components from now on, since we will not be able to buy them from you."

Translation: That's a very very bad news for Google, Intel, ARM,...Since from now on, they will have a competition they need to cope with.


i read all his post and he was clear
few options outside china for huwaei ( if usa sanctions continue)


seems you are reaiudng it the way you want

HE WAS VERY CLEAR
 

HannaTheCrusader

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
First of all, let me clear a FACT for you: China IS THE ONE asking for a deal, and Trump IS THE ONE waging a war. Not the other way.
Second, China has multiple choices. There is a whole Planet outside of America.
Third, China is asking from the start for a fair d

nope china is asking for a deal ( business as usual ) without many conditrions to make the deal mutually benefircail

1- stop supporting the rinbi
2- open financial markets to usa
3- stop forcing usa companies to share their technology
4- buy more us products
5- and a host of demands that china refuses to accept

good for china, let them sell to others ( as if they arent already)
usa has $800 bil purchase bill from china and they want some certain demands and they will get a lot of them,....

dont be more pro Chinese than chinese themselves
 

Abou Sandal

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
i read all his post and he was clear
few options outside china for huwaei ( if usa sanctions continue)


seems you are reaiudng it the way you want

HE WAS VERY CLEAR


Few options for getting chips and OS Ya Hanna...That's what the guy always speaks about...And specifically because Huawei had an agreed upon partnership with Google and Intel and Arm. Now it seems over.

Understanding it as if he said that Huawei can't sell outside China now is completely upside down.
 

HannaTheCrusader

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
hird, and that's the most important part, this part of the article wasn't about what Japan buys from America in terms of beefs! It's about what Australia, New Zealand, and Canada buy from the US!

Which is now reduced thanks to Trump, since by dropping the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement in January 2017, he made Japanese beef cheaper for these markets!

Good Job Trump!

MAGA! (Make Asia Great Again) :lol:

remember agriculture products are finite in nature
how much can australia and agrentina supply ????
usa agriculture productions is so huge that no nation can do without

usa can simply raise the % of methanol ( made by corn ans oy bean) in gas and problem solved ( usa already done that )
also other nations will pick up the shortfall ( mexico, india)
markets are fluid and the quantities are finite
usa can also raise prices on wheat, corn, other products , as they can easily do ( they alway pay farmers not to farm, to keep rpices high, that a decades old usa policy)

so despite those g;llom and doom ( written by looney left articles)
usa beef doing muchg better with or withiut china
that goes to show you THAT CAPITALISM WORKS

BTW WHAT HAPPEN TO CHINA THREATS TO STOP SELLING RARE EARTH MATERIALS ??? guess they realized its another empty threat


AND MOST IMPORTANT

MY HANDSET IS HUWAEI AND IF THE SANCTIONS ARE NOT LIFTED ., THIS SUMMER I WILL BE FORCED TO BUY IPHONE OR SAMSUNG ( WHICH I BOTH HATE, i have been using huwaeo for the past 4 years) but now i cant anymnore

SO WILL YOU BUY HUWAEI ???
SINCE YOU ARE SO PRO CHINA, GO AN BUY ONE

again fo you deny that many companies are moving production away form china ???? do you
who loss is that
yes part are coming back to usa , at least thats some gain
but once a job is gone., its gone for ever

china cant afford the foreign companies hemorrhaging jobs
if this continues and china is hit with 25% to 20% duty on all $800bil usa sales , that will be the biggest mistake china ever made



@Jo

after usa sanctions kick in , can one use Forum with a huwaei product
can one check the forum on FB and Twitter

be careful AS, we might lose you at forum due to your china love :)


CAPITALISM WORKS
CHINA CANT FIGHT CAPITALISM
 

Abou Sandal

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
nope china is asking for a deal ( business as usual ) without many conditrions to make the deal mutually benefircail

1- stop supporting the rinbi
2- open financial markets to usa
3- stop forcing usa companies to share their technology
4- buy more us products
5- and a host of demands that china refuses to accept

good for china, let them sell to others ( as if they arent already)
usa has $800 bil purchase bill from china and they want some certain demands and they will get a lot of them,....

dont be more pro Chinese than chinese themselves


China is asking for a deal, but will only sign a fair deal. Period. And yes of course mutually beneficial, who said otherwise.
At least we now agree on this.

As for the terms, I don't know them and I won't rely on the press and its shiny titles if I were you.

The rest are details.

And I'm not being "more pro Chinese than chinese themselves". See, that's precisely your problem. You think that it is a matter of taking sides with or against this or that country.

I see it as a matter of logic and rationality.

And if I had to place myself somewhere, I'd be more with the ordinary US citizen and the average US enterprise, and against Trump devastating actions against the US market and consumer...(mis)guided by what you called the deep State, that has other plans than the interest of ordinary people.

Oh and by the way, I'm being the capitalist here and unlike you, I don't believe nor trust protectionist and State directed markets. Tariff man disagrees. Seems he learned a lot from the Chinese after all. :lol:
 

HannaTheCrusader

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
Few options for getting chips and OS Ya Hanna...That's what the guy always speaks about...And specifically because Huawei had an agreed upon partnership with Google and Intel and Arm. Now it seems over.

Understanding it as if he said that Huawei can't sell outside China now is completely upside down.


i would say it will drop more than that ( ,more like 70 to 80%) , way more
as no one will buy a smart phone that cant connect to media giants
foreign markets is where the real profits and foreign currency are

again, he can always take over chinese market ( who cares, that wiull put HTC and similar chinese companies out of cell business )

I FOR ONE, A LOYAL HUWAEI CLIENT , WONT BUY IT , if issue not sorted it by august.

Huawei’s overseas cellphone sales will drop by 40%, Ren said, confirming a Bloomberg report published Sunday. But the Chinese market is growing rapidly, and Huawei will not allow restrictive measures to curb its research and development, he added.
 

Abou Sandal

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
@Jo

after usa sanctions kick in , can one use Forum with a huwaei product
can one check the forum on FB and Twitter


be careful AS, we might lose you at forum due to your china love :)


CAPITALISM WORKS
CHINA CANT FIGHT CAPITALISM

Hahaha...Lik I can't believe you're into this stuff...I will reply to the rest later, but you have to promise me that if I call you from a Huawei phone, you will still answer me :lol:
 

HannaTheCrusader

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
China is asking for a deal, but will only sign a fair deal. Period. And yes of course mutually beneficial, who said otherwise.
At least we now agree on this.

As for the terms, I don't know them and I won't rely on the press and its shiny titles if I were you.

The rest are details.

And I'm not being "more pro Chinese than chinese themselves". See, that's precisely your problem. You think that it is a matter of taking sides with or against this or that country.

I see it as a matter of logic and rationality.

And if I had to place myself somewhere, I'd be more with the ordinary US citizen and the average US enterprise, and against Trump devastating actions against the US market and consumer...(mis)guided by what you called the deep State, that has other plans than the interest of ordinary people.

Oh and by the way, I'm being the capitalist here and unlike you, I don't believe nor trust protectionist and State directed markets. Tariff man disagrees. Seems he learned a lot from the Chinese after all. :lol:


i always side with capitalism vs Chinese dictatorship

I HAVE WITNESSED WHAT CHINESE COMPANIES DID TO MANY AFRICAN NATIONS AND HOW THEY WERE LIKE A PLAGUE IN HURTING THE LOCALS

china imperialism IS BY FAR MUCH WORST THAN USA

trust me on this one, i have seen chinese tactics first hand

SO YES, I WILL GO WITH USA OVER THIS ONE
 

HannaTheCrusader

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
Hahaha...Lik I can't believe you're into this stuff...I will reply to the rest later, but you have to promise me that if I call you from a Huawei phone, you will still answer me :lol:

of cpurse i will

i meant
you wont be able to use your chinese made huwaei to comments on OF ( twitter, FB )
due to system restrictions ;)

but you cant call me whatsapp :)
 

opium

Well-Known Member
food items such as soybean, lobster are finite in production

they cant by pass usa producers as hard as they try

eventually canada will run our of lobster, or usa will find other markets ( that used to be supplied by canada)

china has no leverage over usa

as for subsidies, usa always subsidized its farmers, actually it even pays them not to plant crops in some cases

CHINA HAS NO CHOICE BUT TO MAKE A DEAL WITH TRUMP.,as much as they might hate that, they have no other choice


TELL ME WHO WILL BY ( outside china) A HUAWEI PHONE IF THEY CANT ACCESS YOUTUBE, FACEBOOK, WHATSAPP, GOOGLE

will you buy such a phone now ?? TELL ME WILL YOU
You are underestimating China. I am not saying that USA will go bankrupt, but a the moment where the global economy is slow they cannot afford any step back.
China may lose on the short term. But they have the capability/resources and the technology and a huge domestic market to adapt.
I will be the first one to buy a new Huawei with their new operating system. Really!
Why should you lock yourself to Google/Apple/Microsoft ? What stops USA from sanctioning us Lebanese? They have a reason they can use it anytime.
 
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