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J. Abizeid

J. Abizeid

Well-Known Member
http://www.democracynow.org/blog/2015/5/28/the_pre_charge_punishment_of_Julian

Thursday, May 28, 2015

The Pre-charge Punishment of Julian Assange

By Amy Goodman and Denis Moynihan

Tucked away on a side street in one of London’s toniest neighborhoods, just across the street from the sprawling department store Harrods, sits a brick, Victorian-era apartment building that houses the Ecuadorean Embassy. Julian Assange, the founder and editor of the whistle-blower website WikiLeaks, walked into this embassy on June 19, 2012, and hasn’t stepped foot outside since.

Ecuador granted him political asylum, but the United Kingdom refuses to grant him safe passage to leave the country. Instead, the U.K. wants to extradite him to Sweden to answer questions about allegations of sexual misconduct, although charges have never been filed. For close to three years, he has remained a prisoner in the embassy, denied even the hour of sunlight daily that most prisoners are guaranteed. For two years before that, he was either jailed or under strict house arrest in England, all without charge. When I went to London to interview him in the embassy this week, Assange asserted his belief that this pretrial phase is serving as both punishment and deterrent, and that Sweden is acting as a surrogate for the United States, which wants him jailed to stop the work of WikiLeaks.

Nevertheless, WikiLeaks continues, releasing groundbreaking information about potentially catastrophic conditions in Britain’s nuclear-weapons submarines, full chapters of the secret and intensely controversial Trans-Pacific Partnership trade treaty, and more. It was from within the embassy that Assange helped National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden escape Hong Kong after releasing millions of documents detailing U.S. government surveillance programs. En route to political asylum in Latin America, Snowden became stranded in the Moscow airport only after the United States canceled his passport. Russia then granted him temporary political asylum.

When the sexual-misconduct allegations surfaced in late 2010, Assange waited in Stockholm for the prosecutor to question him, then the charges were dropped. He had government permission to leave the country. It was only after he traveled to the United Kingdom that the charges were resuscitated by a second prosecutor. This second prosecutor, Marianne Ny, has had years to question Assange, either in person in London or via video link. Instead, she insisted that Assange be forcibly extradited, until a Swedish court ruled that she should interview him in London. She has now indicated that she will, but so far has not said when.

Assange, his lawyers and his supporters are concerned that, if he were extradited, Sweden would hand him over to the United States, where all signs point to a secret grand-jury investigation of him and WikiLeaks. “Julian would have gone to Sweden a long time ago had he gotten a guarantee from Sweden that they will not forward him to the United States for standing trial on the espionage charges,” said Assange attorney Michael Ratner, president emeritus of the Center for Constitutional Rights. Ratner explained: “Sweden has never been willing to give that guarantee. And Sweden has a very bad reputation of complying with U.S. demands, whether it was sending some people from Sweden to Egypt for torture or whether it’s guaranteeing people who are asylees in Sweden that they won’t be deported.”

Vice President Joe Biden called Assange a “high-tech terrorist,” and elected officials and pundits from both major parties have said publicly that he should be assassinated. Assange told me: “The U.S. case against WikiLeaks is widely believed to be the largest-ever investigation into a publisher. It is extraterritorial. It’s setting new precedents about the ability of the U.S. government to reach out to any media publisher in Europe or the rest of the world, and try and achieve a prosecution. They say the offenses are conspiracy, conspiracy to commit espionage, Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, computer hacking, conversion, stealing government documents.” The espionage charges, if they materialize, could come with the death penalty. Sweden, like most European nations, cannot extradite a person who might thereafter be put to death.

The statute of limitations will expire in August on all but one of the potential Swedish offenses for which Assange is wanted for questioning. The Swedish Supreme Court declined to quash the arrest warrant lodged against him in late 2010, in a 4-1 vote. Justice Svante Johansson, dissenting, wrote that Assange’s de facto detention was “in violation of the principle of proportionality.” Sitting across from me in the conference room of the small embassy that has for three years served as his home, his refuge and his jail, Assange told me, “We have no rights as a defendant because the formal trial hasn’t started yet. No charges, no trial, no ability to defend yourself ... don’t even have the right to documents, because you’re not even a defendant.” His skin is pale from years without sunlight, matching his prematurely white hair. But his resolve is unbroken, and the leaks he originally sought to publish when he founded WikiLeaks almost 10 years ago are still reaching the light of day.


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  • J. Abizeid

    J. Abizeid

    Well-Known Member
    WikiLeaks dumps 276,000 more documents from Sony hack | The Japan Times



    WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange gestures during a press conference inside the Ecuadorian Embassy in London on Aug. 18, 2014, where he has been holed up for two years. | AFP-JIJI

    WikiLeaks dumps 276,000 more documents from Sony hack

    WikiLeaks on Thursday released 276,394 new documents from the hack of Sony Pictures in what could be a further embarrassment for the Japanese media and electronics group.

    The new release adds to more than 30,000 documents published by WikiLeaks in April. Both groups of documents can be searched on the WikiLeaks page.


    The news was announced on Twitter by WikiLeaks, which tweeted “Sony Files Part 2 — 276,394 more docs” and a link to the archive.

    The documents include a list of legal settlements, including a $300,000 payment in March 2014 to a former Sony vice president at the studio’s 3-D technology center, who said she was discriminated against because of her sex and her race. The list didn’t say whether Sony admitted liability.

    The former employee, Michelle Leigh, “was a victim of sex stereotyping by an out of control senior vice-president,” according to a letter sent to the company by her lawyer, Renuka Jain, in November 2013.

    Jain declined to comment. Leigh didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment. A Sony spokesman, Robert Lawson, declined to comment.

    WikiLeaks has said the documents are of public interest because the company is an influential corporation with ties to the White House, able to impact laws and policies, and with connections to the U.S. military-industrial complex.

    Sony Pictures, part of the Japanese-based Sony conglomerate, was the target of a massive cyberattack last November which shut down much of its computer network and allowed hackers to access sensitive information.

    The White House has blamed North Korea for the attack. But Pyongyang has denied responsibility.

    Some of the data was released online after hackers threatened the company over the release of the satirical film “The Interview,” which depicts a fictional CIA plot to kill North Korea’s leader.

    The threats saw Sony cancel the public debut of the movie and led to the resignation of chairperson Amy Pascal. The leaks showed that Pascal had swapped racially insensitive jokes about President Barack Obama over email.

    In April, Sony condemned the release of the data, saying the private information does not belong in the public domain.
     
    Republican

    Republican

    Legendary Member
    More than 500k Saudi documents have been leaked:

    HERE::: The Saudi Cables


    ***

    The saudis are already trying to stop the propagation of the documents

     
    J. Abizeid

    J. Abizeid

    Well-Known Member
    Revealed: How DOJ Gagged Google over Surveillance of WikiLeaks Volunteer - The Intercept

    Revealed: How DOJ Gagged Google over Surveillance of WikiLeaks Volunteer




    The Obama administration fought a legal battle against Google to secretly obtain the email records of a security researcher and journalist associated with WikiLeaks.

    Newly unsealed court documents obtained by The Intercept reveal the Justice Department won an order forcing Google to turn over more than one year’s worth of data from the Gmail account of Jacob Appelbaum (pictured above), a developer for the Tor online anonymity project who has worked with WikiLeaks as a volunteer. The order also gagged Google, preventing it from notifying Appelbaum that his records had been provided to the government.

    The surveillance of Appelbaum’s Gmail account was tied to the Justice Department’s long-running criminal investigation of WikiLeaks, which began in 2010 following the transparency group’s publication of a large cache of U.S. government diplomatic cables.

    According to the unsealed documents, the Justice Department first sought details from Google about a Gmail account operated by Appelbaum in January 2011, triggering a three-month dispute between the government and the tech giant. Government investigators demanded metadata records from the account showing email addresses of those with whom Appelbaum had corresponded between the period of November 2009 and early 2011; they also wanted to obtain information showing the unique IP addresses of the computers he had used to log in to the account.

    The Justice Department argued in the case that Appelbaum had “no reasonable expectation of privacy” over his email records under the Fourth Amendment, which protects against unreasonable searches and seizures. Rather than seeking a search warrant that would require it to show probable cause that he had committed a crime, the government instead sought and received an order to obtain the data under a lesser standard, requiring only “reasonable grounds” to believe that the records were “relevant and material” to an ongoing criminal investigation.

    Google repeatedly attempted to challenge the demand, and wanted to immediately notify Appelbaum that his records were being sought so he could have an opportunity to launch his own legal defense. Attorneys for the tech giant argued in a series of court filings that the government’s case raised “serious First Amendment concerns.” They noted that Appelbaum’s records “may implicate journalistic and academic freedom” because they could “reveal confidential sources or information about WikiLeaks’ purported journalistic or academic activities.”

    However, the Justice Department asserted that “journalists have no special privilege to resist compelled disclosure of their records, absent evidence that the government is acting in bad faith,” and refused to concede Appelbaum was in fact a journalist. It claimed it had acted in “good faith throughout this criminal investigation, and there is no evidence that either the investigation or the order is intended to harass the … subscriber or anyone else.”

    Google’s attempts to fight the surveillance gag order angered the government, with the Justice Department stating that the company’s “resistance to providing the records” had “frustrated the government’s ability to efficiently conduct a lawful criminal investigation.”

    The Justice Department wanted to keep the surveillance secret largely because of an earlier public backlash over its WikiLeaks investigation. In January 2011, Appelbaum and other WikiLeaks volunteers’ – including Icelandic parlimentarian Birgitta Jonsdottir – were notified by Twitter that the Justice Department had obtained data about their accounts. This disclosure generated widepread news coverage and controversy; the government says in the unsealed court records that it “failed to anticipate the degree of damage that would be caused” by the Twitter disclosure and did not want to “exacerbate this problem” when it went after Appelbaum’s Gmail data.

    The court documents show the Justice Department said the disclosure of its Twitter data grab “seriously jeopardized the [WikiLeaks] investigation” because it resulted in efforts to “conceal evidence” and put public pressure on other companies to resist similar surveillance orders. It also claimed that officials named in the subpeona ordering Twitter to turn over information were “harassed” after a copy was published by Intercept co-founder Glenn Greenwald at Salon in 2011. (The only specific evidence of the alleged harassment cited by the government is an email that was sent to an employee of the U.S. Attorney’s office that purportedly said: “You guys are ****ing nazis trying to controll [sic] the whole ****ing world. Well guess what. WE DO NOT FORGIVE. WE DO NOT FORGET. EXPECT US.”)

    Google accused the government of hyperbole and argued that the backlash over the Twitter order did not justify secrecy related to the Gmail surveillance. “Rather than demonstrating how unsealing the order will harm its well-publicized investigation, the government lists a parade of horribles that have allegedly occurred since it unsealed the Twitter order, yet fails to establish how any of these developments could be further exacerbated by unsealing this order,” wrote Google’s attorneys. “The proverbial toothpaste is out of the tube, and continuing to seal a materially identical order will not change it.”

    But Google’s attempt to overturn the gag order was denied by magistrate judge Ivan D. Davis in February 2011. The company launched an appeal against that decision, but this too was rebuffed, in March 2011, by District Court judge Thomas Selby Ellis, III.

    Appelbaum called the case “a travesty that continues at a slow pace.”
    The government agreed to unseal some of the court records on Apr. 1 this year, and they were apparently turned over to Appelbaum on May 14 through a notification sent to his Gmail account. The files were released on condition that they would contain some redactions, which are bizarre and inconsistent, in some cases censoring the name of “WikiLeaks” from cited public news reports.

    Not all of the documents in the case – such as the original surveillance orders contested by Google – were released as part of the latest disclosure. Some contain “specific and sensitive details of the investigation” and “remain properly sealed while the grand jury investigation continues,” according to the court records from April this year.

    Appelbaum, an American citizen who is based in Berlin, called the case “a travesty that continues at a slow pace” and said he felt it was important to highlight “the absolute madness in these documents.”

    He told The Intercept: “After five years, receiving such legal documents is neither a shock nor a needed confirmation. … Will we ever see the full documents about our respective cases? Will we even learn the names of those signing so-called legal orders against us in secret sealed documents? Certainly not in a timely manner and certainly not in a transparent, just manner.”

    The 32-year-old, who has recently collaborated with Intercept co-founder Laura Poitras to report revelations about National Security Agency surveillance for German news magazine Der Spiegel, said he plans to remain in Germany “in exile, rather than returning to the U.S. to experience more harassment of a less than legal kind.”

    “My presence in Berlin ensures that the cost of physically harassing me or politically harassing me is much higher than when I last lived on U.S. soil,” Appelbaum said. “This allows me to work as a journalist freely from daily U.S. government interference. It also ensures that any further attempts to continue this will be forced into the open through [a Mutal Legal Assistance Treaty] and other international processes. The German goverment is less likely to allow the FBI to behave in Germany as they do on U.S. soil.”

    The Justice Department’s WikiLeaks investigaton is headed by prosecutors in the Eastern District of Virginia. Since 2010, the secretive probe has seen activists affiliated with WikiLeaks compelled to appear before a grand jury and the FBI attempting to infiltrate the group with an informant. Earlier this year, it was revealed that the government had obtained the contents of three core WikiLeaks staffers’ Gmail accounts as part of the investigation.

    Google, the Justice Department, and the U.S. Attorneys Office had not responded to requests for comment on this story at time of publication.
     
    J. Abizeid

    J. Abizeid

    Well-Known Member
    WikiLeaks’ Latest Dump: More Sony Documents
    By Paula Mejia 6/21/15 at 12:50 PM

    WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange speaks to the media outside the High Court in London December 5, 2011. Suzanne Plunkett/Reuters

    WikiLeaks has done yet another data dump of classified documents, this time of 276,394 Sony Corp. communications, including email, travel calendars, contact lists, expense reports and private files.

    The whistleblower website disclosed the file release on Thursday, via its Twitter account. In April, WikiLeaks published its first set of 30,287 Sony documents and 173,132 email exchanges. Those documents were said to contain a series of incriminating disclosures about Sony, including “an investigation for bribery,” according to WikiLeaks.

    Sony’s documents were hacked by the so-called Guardians of the Peace hacker group and made public in the lead-up to the release of The Interview, a fictitious account of an assassination attempt on North Korea’s Kim Jong-un, which drew ire from the hermit nation. The documents revealed unfavorable exchanges between executives and producers, and eventually led to the dismissal of Amy Pascal, the studio chief.

    Sony threatened legal action when the first documents were released, but Julian Assange, WikiLeaks’ editor-in-chief, wrote in the April statement: “This archive shows the inner workings of an influential multinational corporation. It is newsworthy and at the centre of a geo-political conflict. It belongs in the public domain. WikiLeaks will ensure it stays there."

    Sony did not offer comment by press time.
     
    J. Abizeid

    J. Abizeid

    Well-Known Member
    US 'spied on French presidents' - Wikileaks - BBC News

    US 'spied on French presidents' - Wikileaks



    The US National Security Agency (NSA) spied on French Presidents Jacques Chirac, Nicolas Sarkozy and Francois Hollande in 2006-12, WikiLeaks says.

    The whistleblower website cites "top secret intelligence reports and technical documents" from the NSA.

    US state department spokesman John Kirby said: "We do not comment on the veracity or content of leaked documents." France has made no comment.

    The NSA was earlier accused of spying on German Chancellor Angela Merkel.

    That allegation arose from documents leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden about large-scale US surveillance in 2013.


    However, earlier this month Germany dropped its investigation, saying the NSA had failed to provide enough evidence to justify legal action.

    On Tuesday, Wikileaks said it began publishing the files under the heading "Espionnage Elysee" - a reference to the French presidential palace.

    It said the secret files "derive from directly targeted NSA surveillance of the communications" of the three French presidents as well as French ministers and the ambassador to the US.

    One of the files, dated 2012, is about Mr Hollande discussing Greece's possible exit from the eurozone.

    It is unclear whether the material comes from the data stolen by Edward Snowden, the BBC's security correspondent Gordon Corera says.
     
    J. Abizeid

    J. Abizeid

    Well-Known Member

    Assange on the Untold Story of the Grounding of Evo Morales’ Plane During Edward Snowden Manhunt
     
    J. Abizeid

    J. Abizeid

    Well-Known Member
    Wikileaks claims NSA spied on three French presidents - Telegraph

    President François Hollande has called an emergency national defence council meeting after allegations by the online whistleblower WikiLeaks that America's National Security Agency (NSA) spied on three successive French presidents.


    The documents detail the mobile phone numbers of numerous officials in the Elysée up to and including the mobile phone line of the president Photo: ALAIN JOCARD/EPA


    President François Hollande has called an emergency national defence council meeting after allegations by the online whistleblower WikiLeaks that America's National Security Agency (NSA) spied on three successive French presidents.


    The meeting will be held at 9am on Wednesday “to evaluate the nature of the information published by the press… and to draw useful conclusions,” a presidential aide said.

    The announcement came just hours after WikiLeaks published documents it says show that the National Security Agency spied on top French government figures from at least 2006 until 2012.

    “The top secret documents derive from directly targeted NSA surveillance of the communications of French Presidents Francois Hollande (2012–present), Nicolas Sarkozy (2007–2012), and Jacques Chirac (1995–2007), as well as French cabinet ministers and the French Ambassador to the United States,” it said in a statement.

    The revelation that the United States was spying on its close ally for political, economic and diplomatic intelligence is likely to cause a political storm in France, whose parliament is currently finalising a new bill that would give French intelligence agencies sweeping new powers to monitor phone metadata and online activities.

    Revelations that the NSA was allegedly eavesdropping on Angela Merkel’s mobile phone sparked a political scandal in Germany in 2013 and led to the German Chancellor issuing a strong rebuke to the United States.

    "While the German disclosures focused on the isolated fact that senior officials were targeted by US intelligence, WikiLeaks' publication today provides much greater insight into US spying on its allies," WikiLeaks said.

    The latest revelations consist of NSA intelligence summaries of conversations between top French officials on issues such as the global financial crisis, the Greek debt crisis, the leadership and future of the European Union, the website said in documents first reported by French media.

    Other issues included the relationship between Mr Hollande’s Socialist government and Ms Merkel’s administration in Germany, French efforts to determine the make-up of the executive staff of the United Nations, and a dispute between the French and US governments over US spying on France.

    The documents also detail the mobile phone numbers of numerous officials in the Elysée, up to and including the mobile phone line of the president, and those of the prime minister and other ministers.

    WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange said: "The French people have a right to know that their elected government is subject to hostile surveillance from a supposed ally. We are proud of our work with leading French publishers Liberation and Mediapart to bring this story to light.”

    He said that French readers could expect more timely and important revelations in the near future."

    All the documents were classified as “top secret” and were destined for NSA and other US intelligence chiefs, with just two of the five marked to be passed on to the “Five Eyes” - the intelligence partnership that includes the UK, Australia, Canada and New Zealand, French media said.

    There was no immediate reaction from French officials late on Tuesday when the documents were first released.

    But Libération reported that Mr Hollande’s aides said when the paper contacted them for comment that when the president had visited Washington last year, US President Barack Obama had made a commitment to end eavesdropping on allied countries.

    Last week, WikiLeaks published more than 60,000 diplomatic cables from Saudi Arabia and said on its website it would release half a million more in the coming weeks.
     
    J. Abizeid

    J. Abizeid

    Well-Known Member
    http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2015/06/24/world/europe/ap-eu-france-us-spying.html


    France Calls in US Envoy Over Spying, Holds Security Meeting

    By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
    June 24, 2015


    PARIS — Angry and embarrassed, France summoned the U.S. ambassador Wednesday to respond to the revelations by WikiLeaks that the U.S. National Security Agency eavesdropped on three successive French presidents and other top officials.

    The release of the spying revelations appeared to be timed to coincide with a final vote Wednesday in the French Parliament on a bill allowing broad new surveillance powers, in particular to counter terrorism threats.

    French President Hollande, calling the U.S. spying an "unacceptable" security breach, convened two emergency meetings as a result of the disclosures about the NSA's spying. The first was with France's top security officials, the second with leading legislators, many of whom have already voted for the new surveillance measure.

    Hollande was to speak Wednesday with President Barack Obama on the issue.

    The documents appear to capture top French officials in Paris between 2006 and 2012 talking candidly about Greece's economy, relations with Germany, and American spying on allies. While there were no huge surprises, the release of the documents late Tuesday angered and embarrassed French officialdom.

    The top floor of the U.S. Embassy, visible from France's presidential Elysee Palace, reportedly was filled with spying equipment hidden behind trompe l'oeil paintings of windows, according to the Liberation newspaper, which partnered with WikiLeaks and the website Mediapart on the documents.

    U.S. Ambassador Jane Hartley was summoned to the French Foreign Ministry. Hollande is also sending France's top intelligence coordinator to the U.S. shortly, to ensure that promises made after earlier NSA spying revelations in 2013 and 2014 have been kept, the spokesman said.

    Prime Minister Manuel Valls said the U.S. must do everything it can, and quickly, to "repair the damage" to U.S.-French relations from the revelations, which he called "a very serious violation of the spirit of trust" between the allies.

    "If the fact of the revelations today does not constitute a real surprise for anyone, that in no way lessens the emotion and the anger. They are legitimate. France will not tolerate any action threatening its security and fundamental interests," he said.

    Government spokesman Stephane Le Foll told reporters "France does not listen in on its allies." He added, "we reminded all (government) ministers to be vigilant in their conversations."

    The U.S. Embassy had no comment on the WikiLeaks revelations.

    U.S. National Security Council spokesman Ned Price released a statement Tuesday evening saying the U.S. is "not targeting and will not target the communications of President Hollande." Price did not address claims that the U.S. had previously eavesdropped on Hollande or his predecessors, Nicolas Sarkozy and Jacques Chirac.

    Two of the cables — dealing with then-President Sarkozy and Chirac, his predecessor — were marked "USA, AUS, CAN, GBR, NZL" suggesting that the material was meant to be shared with Britain, Canada and other members of the so-called Five Eyes intelligence alliance.

    The disclosures, which emerged late Tuesday, mean that France has joined Germany on the list of U.S. allies targeted by the NSA.

    "This involves unacceptable acts that have already given rise to discussions between the United States and France," Hollande said in a statement after an emergency defense council meeting. The statement said France has reinforced protective measures, without elaborating.

    There was no instant confirmation on the accuracy of the documents, which covered intercepts from 2006-12. WikiLeaks, however, has a track record of publishing intelligence and diplomatic material.

    An aide to Sarkozy told The Associated Press that the former president considers these methods unacceptable. There was no immediate comment from Chirac.

    France is among several U.S. allies that rely heavily on American spying powers when trying to prevent terrorism and other threats, and the intelligence bill expected to pass Wednesday was intended to bolster French capabilities. The French government has repeatedly denied accusations that it wants NSA-style powers.

    Le Foll, who was heading Wednesday to Washington on a previously scheduled trip, said it wasn't a diplomatic rupture, riffing that France was sending not an aircraft carrier to the U.S. but a replica of the Hermione, the ship that carried General Marquis de Lafayette from France to America in 1780 to offer help in the Revolution.

    But, he added, "when you see this between allied countries it's unacceptable and, I would add, incomprehensible."
     
    J. Abizeid

    J. Abizeid

    Well-Known Member
    With Its French NSA Leak, WikiLeaks Is Back | WIRED

    With Its French NSA Leak, WikiLeaks Is Back


    WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange is seen on a screen speaking via web cast from the Ecuadorian Embassy in London. FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/Getty
    Classified documents appear on WikiLeaks.org, revealing that the American government is spying on its allies. American officials rush to deal with a sudden diplomatic crisis while publicly refusing to comment on leaked materials. And WikiLeaks proclaims that it’s just getting started.

    You could be forgiven for thinking you’d woken up in the fall of 2010, at the height of Cablegate, when Wikileaks released a massive dump of the State Department’s classified communications. But no—it’s 2015, Julian Assange has a beard, and WikiLeaks is back in the business of leaking top-secret documents that even world leaders can’t ignore.

    On Tuesday night WikiLeaks released a collection of documents it’s called Espionnage Élysée, a collection of classified NSA files that show that the US intelligence agency has been spying on French heads of state going back three administrations. The documents even include evidence that the NSA listened in on the French presidents’ phone calls. On Wednesday the French foreign ministry summoned the American ambassador to a meeting to explain that snooping, and president Francois Hollande issued a statement that “France will not tolerate actions that threaten its security and the protection of its interests.”

    Aside from the leak’s revelation that France, like Germany, falls under the NSA’s virtually limitless spying on foreigners, it also represents a milestone for WikiLeaks: the first top-secret document it’s published in years. Taken along with an accelerating series of other recent WikiLeaks releases and the re-launch of its submission system for anonymous leaks, it seems to show that WikiLeaks may be returning to form, as a combative champion of whistleblowers and the bane of every government agency that works in secret.

    “Since the submission system finally became operational, there’s been a significant change,” says Birgitta Jonsdottir, a member of the Icelandic parliament who worked as a member of WikiLeaks until close to the prolific peak of its publications in late 2010. Jonsdottir left the group following disagreements with its founder Julian Assange, and has since become an occasional critic of its activities. “It seems like they’re gaining traction again… The leaks are coming. It seems like it’s back to how WikiLeaks used to be.”
    In late 2014 and the first half of this year, WikiLeaks’ leaks have indeed been accelerating. It published drafts of the secret Trans-Pacific Partnership trade agreement. It leaked secret EU documents outlining a plan for military intervention against boats of refugees traveling across the Mediterranean from Libya to Italy. It published the account of a whistleblower concerned over safety problems in the UK’s Trident nuclear program. It revealed a CIA document detailing how the agency makes decisions about who to assassinate and when. And just last week it released the first of a half million secret documents from within the Saudi Arabian government, which it plans to trickle out through Middle Eastern media partners over the coming months.

    Those sorts of bombshells mark a gradual but significant shift out of a five-year period when WikiLeaks seemed to have diminished in activity—or at points practically gone into hibernation. In 2013, for instance, WikiLeaks mostly published already-public files, like the court documents of WikiLeaks ally and Pirate Bay founder Gottfrid Svartholm Warg as well as a collection of unclassified US State Department Cables from the 1970s. At the time, the group almost seemed to have transformed from the world’s most radical journalists into its most controversial librarians.

    But the strongest sign of new life from WikiLeaks is its efforts to enable and even incentivize leakers to give it fresh material. In early May, it relaunched its submission system, a Tor-based dark web site designed to guarantee anonymity to any submitter. That leak portal had once represented the core of the WikiLeaks idea: A no-questions-asked drop box for the world’s secrets that any whistleblower could access with the least possible risk. But it went offline in late 2010, the result of a mutiny of several WikiLeakers who had bristled under Assange’s leadership. For nearly five years, the system remained offline, leaving leakers to search out Assange or his associates through other, potentially riskier means of communication.

    Now that leak portal is back. And WikiLeaks isn’t just accepting leaks, but for the first time, trying to get leakers paid for them. In a new “competition,” which it calls the Prize for Understanding Good Government or PUGG, WikiLeaks is crowdsourcing donations from visitors and offering the resulting cash them to anyone who leaks a certain document. The project has already issued a call for a $100,000 bounty for the 26 chapters of the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade agreement, and raised nearly $75,000 from about 1,500 donors.

    But Hrafnsson admits that WikiLeaks was hamstrung for much of the last half decade by legal and financial attacks on the group, including a refusal by Visa, MasterCard, Paypal, and Bank of America to process its donations. “We were without significant funds for a period of almost three years,” says Hrafnsson. “We had to scale down, to abandon plans to expand. We didn’t grow in the way we wanted to, and a lot of our resources in manpower and finances had to be used on all these legal challenges, some of which are still ongoing.”

    Those “challenges” include Sweden’s demand that Assange come to Stockholm to face questioning for alleged sex crimes against two women. The Australian just marked his third year of life in London’s Ecuadorean embassy, where he’s sought asylum to avoid extradition. A grand jury investigation in the United States appears to be continuing in secret. Just last week Google revealed that it had been sent a warrant for more of the private data of Jacob Appelbaum, an American security researcher and journalist associated with the group.

    None of that seems to have deterred WikiLeaks from continuing its new spate of leaks. It’s promised to follow up on its French NSA leak with “further evidence as to US true goals in its mass espionage of France.” And Hrafnsson claims the group is in some ways in better shape than it was at its peak in 2010. “We’ve strengthened our infrastructure, our ability to process huge databases has grown, we’ve expanded our network of media alliances,” he says. “We are in a much stronger position in many ways than we were five years ago.”

    “Of course we depend on the materials that whistleblowers and sources want to contribute to our website for publication,” Hrafnsson adds. “But we’re ready to take off.”
     
    nonsense

    nonsense

    Legendary Member
    February 12, 2016
    Assange’s UN Victory and Redemption of the West

    by Nozomi Hayase




    Last week, the United Nations Working Group (UNWG) on Arbitrary Detention ruled that journalist Julian Assange had been subject to arbitrary detention by the Swedish and British governments and that it must end. The Center for Constitutional Rights noted the significant precedent in the law of detention and the larger implications this has, not only for Assange’s case, but also for the protection of whistle-blowers and refugees around the world.

    For the last five and half years, Assange has been detained without charge (first in solitary, then house arrest and now confined in the Ecuadorian Embassy). Over these years, the prosecutor’s repeated refusal to interview Assange has denied him the right to defend himself, even though the interviewing of suspects in the UK is a normal Swedish legal practice. His case became complex, revolving around allegations that were largely fabricated. Swedish authorities indicate that one of the women involved felt the police made up the charges and ‘railroaded’ her. Assangewas cleared of the suspicion of ‘rape’ by a chief prosecutor in Stockholm before it was then reopened by another prosecutor.

    Renowned investigative journalist John Pilger called this case a farce and an obstruction of justice. CIA analyst Ray McGovern described it as not simply a miscarriage of justice, but an abortion. There are undeniable facts that clearly show the politically driven nature of what has been presented to the world as a ‘legal process’.

    As the lies spread, sometimes a picture speaks a thousand words. This image by political cartoonist Carlos Latuff below pierces the veil of complexity and reveals what this case is all about.

    After a 16 month independent investigation that accounted all evidence submitted by Sweden and the UK, this highest authority of the UN on detention came to the conclusion that the United Kingdom and Sweden has been refusing to recognize Assange’s right of asylum or offer any guarantee that he will not be extradited to the United States, a country that detains without charge and even tortures.

    Assange’s attorney Melinda Taylor stated how this ruling “dispels the myth that Mr. Assange is either a fugitive from justice or that he could just walk out of the embassy” and affirms that he is a victim of injustice caused by both Sweden and the UK.

    Both Swedish and UK authorities rejected the decision of the UN panel. British Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond immediately called the ruling ridiculous and dismissed it, saying it would have no effect on their actions. A disturbing fact emerged when Norwegian Professor Mads Andenas, who heads the Working Group, revealed that the UK and Sweden put enormous pressure on members of this group leading up to the decision. As UN human rights chief, Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein described, the Working Group based its decision on binding international law and that Britain and Sweden both need to abide by its findings. By refusing to recognize this determination, both the UK and Sweden are undermining the UN system for which both countries signed binding treaties.

    While much of the mainstream media has echoed this arrogant defiance in the UK and Swedish governments’ response to the finding of the UNWG, Prime Minister David Cameron also chimed in this week. Speaking to Parliament, he repeated the old lies, claiming that Assange, who has never been charged, was “wanted for trial”. He held to the official line, calling the working group’s decision “ridiculous”, blaming the victim and jeopardizing his own country’s reputation for justice.

    Why is this kind of arbitrary detention happening on UK soil, in a country that gave birth to the Magna Carta eight hundred years ago? This foundational document seeded the notion of due process, which found its flowering in the US Constitution.

    In chapter 39, King John promised that:

    “No free man shall be taken or imprisoned or disseized or exiled or in any way destroyed, nor will we go upon him nor send upon him, except by the lawful judgment of his peers or by the law of the land.”

    Another British man, George Orwell reminded us of the promise of liberty. He once said, “If liberty means anything at all, it means the right to tell people what they do not want to hear.” Upholding this liberty and defending freedom of speech is exactly what WikiLeaks has done. They did this by publishing secret government documents that are embarrassing and inconvenient to those who have blood on their hands.

    Through the methods of transparency, this whistle-blowing site made it possible for ordinary people to challenge the legitimacy of elected officials, and tell those in power what they do not want to hear. Assange, who became a lightning rod for liberty, has been attacked by a triage of US, Swedish and UK governments for more than 5 years, and as well by an army of Western media that acts as a Guardian of power.

    With Assange’s UN win, it is now clear that in the case of Julian Assange, serious violations of due process have been committed. Injustices against this publisher of last resort are not against this one individual alone, but are by extension an assault against free speech around the world and a travesty against the fundamental rights that so many in democratic societies cherish.

    History has repeatedly shown that humans are not perfect. We are all fallible and don’t always know what is right. But history also offers humanity the grace to correct their mistakes and alter the course of the future. The verdict of this UNWG is now giving us all such an opportunity.

    UK and Swedish governments can shift the course of history if they choose to. They can repent past wrongdoing, like their collusion with illegal wars and atrocities of the warlords and corporate puppets in Washington. They can remedy some of the harm that has been done. They can redeem the basic principle of human rights by implementing these UN recommendations; to start with, return Assange’s passport or issue a new one, so he can walk free.

    After the UN announced their position, Assange gave a speech on the balcony of the Ecuadorian Embassy. He acknowledged the good will of many people, saying how the victory of this ruling came about as a result of many people struggling for it; governments, the president of Ecuador who offered asylum from US extradition, his legal team and a swath of citizens in the UK, Sweden, US, Australia and other countries.

    Fundamentally it is up to all of us to continue to carry on this struggle, to resist adversarial forces working against democracy. Many have already taken such steps. For example, a law professor at Oxford voiced support for the decision of the UNWG. Such courage creates a path for others to follow.

    It is not too late for the West to step onto the right side of history. We can all respond to this call to show the rest of the world how we can become nations that honor the enlightenment values and realize the promise the West once made to the world.

    Nozomi Hayase, Ph.D., is a writer who has been covering issues of freedom of speech, transparency and decentralized movements. Find her on twitter @nozomimagine
     
    Kizzeb2019

    Kizzeb2019

    Well-Known Member
    WikiLeaks Has Officially Lost the Moral High Ground

    People attend a video conference with WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange at the International Center for Advanced Communication Studies for Latin America auditorium in Quito, Ecuador on June 23, 2016.RODRIGO BUENDIA/AFP/GETTY IMAGES

    WHAT THE HECK is going on at WikiLeaks?

    In the last two weeks, the font of digital secrets has doxed millions of Turkish women, leaked Democratic National Committee emails that made Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign look bad but also suggested the site was colluding with the Russian government, and fired off some seriously anti-Semitic tweets.

    It’s…weird.

    WikiLeaks is always going to be releasing information some people don’t like. That is the point of them. But lately the timing of and tone surrounding their leaks have felt a little off, and in cases like the DNC leak, more than a little biased. At times, they haven’t looked so much like a group speaking truth to power as an alt-right subreddit, right down to their defense of Milo Yiannopoulos, a (let’s be honest, kind of trollish) writer at Breitbart. But the way WikiLeaks behaves on the Internet means a lot more than some basement-dwelling MRA activist. “WikiLeaks’ initial self-presentation was as merely a conduit, simply neutral, like any technology,” says Mark Fenster, a lawyer at the University of Florida’s Levin College of Law. “As a conduit, it made a lot of sense, and had a lot of influence, immediately. The problem is, WikiLeaks is not just a technology. It’s humans too.”

    WikiLeaks has endangered individuals before, but their release of the so-called Erdogan Emails was particularly egregious. The organization said that the infodump would expose the machinations of Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdogan immediately after the attempted coup against him, but instead turned out to be mostly correspondence and personal information from everyday Turkish citizens. Worse, it included the home addresses, phone numbers, party affiliations, and political activity levels of millions of female Turkish voters. That’s irresponsible any time, and disastrous in the week of a coup.

    The incident exposed gross negligence, though it’s true that lots of publications (including WIRED) made things worse by failing to vet the leak’s content and linking to the documents in their coverage. Zeynep Tufekci, a sociologist at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (herself of Turkish descent), wrote an essay criticizing WikiLeaks and Western media outlets for endangering Turkish citizens, and WikiLeaks and their supporters turned on her, hard. “Within five minutes they called me an Erdogan apologist, which speaks volumes to their lack of research,” Tufekci says. “And then they blocked me. So much for hearing something they don’t like.”

    The provenance and truth of the DNC emails looks more solid—but those sketchy ties to Russia make the whole thing seem like a foreign government trying to influence the US presidential election. It’s a little weird (tinfoil hat alert) that Julian Assange, WikiLeaks’ founder, has a show on RT, a Russian government-funded (read: propaganda) television network. And a little off that the DNC leak whodunnit seems to point to a pair of Russian hackers thought to be affiliated with the Russian intelligence agencies FSB and GRU, respectively.

    And then, inexplicably, the WikiLeaks official Twitter account also dove straight for naked anti-Semitism. (The triple parenthesis around names is code for “Jewish” in antisemitic circles.)


    [URL='http://twitter.com/MarlowNYC/status/756996229821829120/photo/1?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw']View image on Twitter



    Follow
    Marlow Stern

    ✔@MarlowNYC



    In which WikiLeaks goes full anti-Semitism

    2:35 AM - 24 Jul 2016 · Manhattan, NY, United States
    [/URL]


    First they denied the tweet was anti-Semitic at all. Then they deleted it, and defended the deletion like this:

    24 Jul
    Anshel Pfeffer

    ✔@AnshelPfeffer

    Strangely enough, you deleted that tweet. But your loyal followers understood exactly what you meant. https://twitter.com/wikileaks/status/756999790005739521 …


    Follow
    WikiLeaks

    ✔@wikileaks

    @AnshelPfeffer No. We deleted it because it was been intentionally miscomprehended by pro-Clinton hacks and by Neo-Nazis.

    3:17 AM - 24 Jul 2016


    Which as rebuttals go, is about as convincing as “I know you are, but what am I?”

    But that’s not what’s really important here. WikiLeaks and Assange say they have no responsibility for the content they leak, and that no one has evidence that the sources of the DNC leak are Russian. But these leaks and tweets damage WikiLeaks’ credibility. If they’re not scrutinizing their own leaks on the base level of their content, it’s not hard to imagine that WikiLeaks could unwittingly become part of someone else’s agenda (like, say, a Russian one). “If you are a legitimate leaker, why go with WikiLeaks? You go with The Intercept or the New York Times, like they did with the Panama Papers” says Nicholas Weaver, a computer scientist at UC Berkeley who studies the organization. “Wikileaks is a pastebin for spooks, and they’re happy to be used that way.”

    WikiLeaks isn’t necessarily the big bad here—if the FSB wants to leak some DNC emails as part of an effort to install Trump as a “Siberian Candidate,” (don’t look at us; that’s the New York Times’ joke) they’re going to do it. But WikiLeaks’ actions could have effects that run counter to their own ideals. “This has done more damage to the fight for free and open internet than anything Erdogan could do,” says Tufekci. “If you expose people’s private information, and then the Western media publicizes it, they are going to withdraw from the Internet.”

    Fundamentally, WikiLeaks was supposed to be better. Assange openly said he hoped the DNC leak damaged the Clinton campaign. “There was the hope that in the wake of WikiLeaks’ emergence, a thousand WikiLeaks would bloom, in the same way that the Arab Spring was a really romantic ideal of the effect that digital communication can have on geopolitics,” says Fenster. “But the ideal of WikiLeaks as an information conduit that is stateless and can serve as a neutral technology isn’t working. States fight back.” WikiLeaks’ moral high ground depends on its ability to act as an honest conduit. Right now it’s acting like a damaged filter.
     
    H

    hola!

    Member
    Sweden to Question Wikileaks Founder Assange at London Embassy Hideout - ABC News

    Sweden to Question Wikileaks Founder Assange at London Embassy Hideout


    Peter Nicholls/Reuters
    Julian Assange makes a speech from the balcony of the Ecuadorian Embassy, in central London, Britain Feb. 5, 2016.
    Ecuadorian authorities have said that they will allow Swedish authorities to interrogate Wikileaks founder Julian Assange, inside their embassy in London, where he has been living for the past several years.

    The announcement comes four years after the South American country first granted the transparency activist asylum and allowed him to live in the embassy -- a move that prevented his extradition to Sweden, where authorities have wanted to question him on allegations of rape.

    In a statement released on Thursday, authorities said that the Ecuadorian Attorney General had notified his Swedish counterpart of his willingness to allow Assange to be questioned. Ecuador maintains that they have offered access to Assange for questioning for several years.

    Swedish authorities had previously wanted to question Assange in their own jurisdiction. He was accused of a 2010 rape in the country.

    No date for Sweden's interrogation of Assange has been set. The statement said that it would be agreed upon "in the coming weeks."

    He has not been charged and denies the allegations made by two women, according to the Associated Press.

    Assange’s defense lawyers welcomed the announcement saying, it "comes after six years of complete inaction on the part of the Swedish prosecutor," according to the AP.

    Swedish authorities sent a formal request to the Ecuadorian embassy asking to interview the Wikileaks founder in January, the AP reported.

    Among other controversial publications, Wikileaks released secret military and State Department documents it received from Chelsea Manning, formerly known as Bradley Manning, an American soldier who is currently serving a 35-year sentence for the leak.

    In the statement released on Thursday, Ecuadorian authorities reiterated "the validity of the asylum" they granted to the Australian citizen in August, 2012. It said that a key motivation for granting Assange asylum in the case was "fear of political persecution."
     
    HannaTheCrusader

    HannaTheCrusader

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    WikiLeaks dumps 276,000 more documents from Sony hack | The Japan Times



    WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange gestures during a press conference inside the Ecuadorian Embassy in London on Aug. 18, 2014, where he has been holed up for two years. | AFP-JIJI

    WikiLeaks dumps 276,000 more documents from Sony hack

    WikiLeaks on Thursday released 276,394 new documents from the hack of Sony Pictures in what could be a further embarrassment for the Japanese media and electronics group.

    The new release adds to more than 30,000 documents published by WikiLeaks in April. Both groups of documents can be searched on the WikiLeaks page.


    The news was announced on Twitter by WikiLeaks, which tweeted “Sony Files Part 2 — 276,394 more docs” and a link to the archive.

    The documents include a list of legal settlements, including a $300,000 payment in March 2014 to a former Sony vice president at the studio’s 3-D technology center, who said she was discriminated against because of her sex and her race. The list didn’t say whether Sony admitted liability.

    The former employee, Michelle Leigh, “was a victim of sex stereotyping by an out of control senior vice-president,” according to a letter sent to the company by her lawyer, Renuka Jain, in November 2013.

    Jain declined to comment. Leigh didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment. A Sony spokesman, Robert Lawson, declined to comment.

    WikiLeaks has said the documents are of public interest because the company is an influential corporation with ties to the White House, able to impact laws and policies, and with connections to the U.S. military-industrial complex.

    Sony Pictures, part of the Japanese-based Sony conglomerate, was the target of a massive cyberattack last November which shut down much of its computer network and allowed hackers to access sensitive information.

    The White House has blamed North Korea for the attack. But Pyongyang has denied responsibility.

    Some of the data was released online after hackers threatened the company over the release of the satirical film “The Interview,” which depicts a fictional CIA plot to kill North Korea’s leader.

    The threats saw Sony cancel the public debut of the movie and led to the resignation of chairperson Amy Pascal. The leaks showed that Pascal had swapped racially insensitive jokes about President Barack Obama over email.

    In April, Sony condemned the release of the data, saying the private information does not belong in the public domain.
    haram see how he look snow
    hasnt seen sun in years

     
    HannaTheCrusader

    HannaTheCrusader

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    wikileaks has done a great service to the world
    it has opened the eyes of many
    has given the average person some powers through the media
    wikileaks has broken or lessened the msm hold of the populations
    wikileaks has dealt a severe blow to the media elites
     
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