i find that to be interesting.

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  • Iron Maiden

    Iron Maiden

    Paragon of Bacon
    Orange Room Supporter
    This is so true, yet i never realized it until i thought abt my last few long distance car rides


    the insect apocalypse markers are getting clearer by the day, this could change/kill whole ecosystems

     
    Dark Angel

    Dark Angel

    Legendary Member
    the things they don't mention and intentionally leave out when telling you about the glory of thomas edison, among others..

    thomas edison executed thousand of animals, cats, dogs, horses and finally an elephant in his feud with Nicolas Tesla, he invented the execution chair and executed thousands of animals in a marketing and negative advertising scheme to give the alternative current a bad name and induce fear from it in the masses.

    below is the recorded movie of the elephant execution by electrocution...

     
    Iron Maiden

    Iron Maiden

    Paragon of Bacon
    Orange Room Supporter
    the things they don't mention and intentionally leave out when telling you about the glory of thomas edison, among others..

    thomas edison executed thousand of animals, cats, dogs, horses and finally an elephant in his feud with Nicolas Tesla, he invented the execution chair and executed thousands of animals in a marketing and negative advertising scheme to give the alternative current a bad name and induce fear from it in the masses.

    below is the recorded movie of the elephant execution by electrocution...

    not a day goes by that my admiration for tesla doesnt grow larger and my loathing for eddison doesnt get any smaller.. what a disgusting man!
     
    Dr. Strangelove

    Dr. Strangelove

    Nuclear War Expert
    Staff member
    the things they don't mention and intentionally leave out when telling you about the glory of thomas edison, among others..

    thomas edison executed thousand of animals, cats, dogs, horses and finally an elephant in his feud with Nicolas Tesla, he invented the execution chair and executed thousands of animals in a marketing and negative advertising scheme to give the alternative current a bad name and induce fear from it in the masses.

    below is the recorded movie of the elephant execution by electrocution...

    That is seriously ****ed up.
     
    Iron Maiden

    Iron Maiden

    Paragon of Bacon
    Orange Room Supporter
    video games and the internet once again push towards more transparency and freedom of expression

    a minecraft server hosting an open library for censored articles from around the world by all governments to push for free press and truth

     
    Orangina

    Orangina

    Legendary Member
    video games and the internet once again push towards more transparency and freedom of expression

    a minecraft server hosting an open library for censored articles from around the world by all governments to push for free press and truth

    very interesting
     
    fidelio

    fidelio

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Distancing #8: Blüte, Gerüst
    A HOMEBOUND REGISTRY OF OTHER PLACES AND TIMES AND THE ALBUMS THAT TAKE US THERE.
    by Jez Burrows
    May 15th, 2020

    This isn’t a joke, but it does begin with a man walking into a bar.

    It’s spring in Berlin, almost three years ago, and a man is walking home when he finds a bar with a piano inside. He sits down and performs an impromptu fifty-minute concert in two parts, recording the whole thing with his phone. The music feels improvisational, often breezy and wistful, occasionally punctuated by bursts of playful discordance. The owners bring him a free beer.

    The phone records not just the piano, but life happening indifferently all around: birdsong, traffic, the variable murmur of customers ordering drinks. Sometimes the music seems to be in cheerful conversation with it all. A two-tone siren wails in the background and the piano pauses, repeats it back like a myna bird. There’s a moment around 6:38 that still makes me smile every time I hear it, when a distant car honk falls perfectly in the space between two notes. (Jazz is all about the horns you’re not honking, baby.)

    What makes this all so magical to me, and why I’ve listened to it hundreds of times over the past few years, is that it’s just as much a recording of a place as it is of a performance. As we all adjust to life for the foreseeable future as a primarily indoor species, the ability to project ourselves outdoors seems vital. Maybe you do this by reading, or by stewarding desert islands of sassy talking animals, or by watching musicians sing to you live on Instagram as you squint into the background to see how messy their living rooms are. I’ve been doing all of those things too, but I’ve also been returning to this music—finding a spare seat outside a bar on a warm spring night somewhere in Berlin, and listening to a stranger conduct a concerto for piano, bird, and car horn.

    I’ve always thought of music as an affordable method of time travel; turns out it also makes for a serviceable teleportation device.

    — Jez Burrows
    Seattle, day 16

    Link to article and Track

    Jez Burrows is a designer, illustrator, and the author of And Introducing, and Dictionary Stories: Short Fictions and Other Findings. jezburrows.com
     
    fidelio

    fidelio

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Can we escape from information overload?
    We live in an age of infinite scrolling and endless interruptions. So what happens when you switch off the lights? Tom Lamont finds out


    One day in December 2016 a 37-year-old British artist named Sam Winston equipped himself with a step-ladder, a pair of scissors, several rolls of black-out cloth and a huge supply of duct tape, and set about a project he had been considering for some time. Slight and bearded, with large grey-blue eyes, Winston had moved to London from Devon in the late 1990s. He supported himself through his 20s and 30s by teaching, doing illustrations for magazines and selling larger, freer-form artworks, many of them pencil-drawn, to collectors and museums. He had just collaborated on a children’s book with author Oliver Jeffers, and done his part to propel “Child of Books” up the bestseller lists. Grateful as he was for commercial success, Winston found he disliked corporate publishing. All the emails! He saw himself as a lead-smudged idealist, an artist-hermit at heart. He’d been troubled by nervous energy and stress since he was young, was an intermittent insomniac, had difficulty filtering noise and distractions in public spaces, and was someone who – like so many of us – increasingly relied on his phone and computer. So Winston decided to hole up for a few days. No screens. No sun. No visual stimulation of any kind. He was going to spend some time alone in the dark.

    Continue HERE
     
    Orangina

    Orangina

    Legendary Member
    Distancing #8: Blüte, Gerüst
    A HOMEBOUND REGISTRY OF OTHER PLACES AND TIMES AND THE ALBUMS THAT TAKE US THERE.
    by Jez Burrows
    May 15th, 2020

    This isn’t a joke, but it does begin with a man walking into a bar.

    It’s spring in Berlin, almost three years ago, and a man is walking home when he finds a bar with a piano inside. He sits down and performs an impromptu fifty-minute concert in two parts, recording the whole thing with his phone. The music feels improvisational, often breezy and wistful, occasionally punctuated by bursts of playful discordance. The owners bring him a free beer.

    The phone records not just the piano, but life happening indifferently all around: birdsong, traffic, the variable murmur of customers ordering drinks. Sometimes the music seems to be in cheerful conversation with it all. A two-tone siren wails in the background and the piano pauses, repeats it back like a myna bird. There’s a moment around 6:38 that still makes me smile every time I hear it, when a distant car honk falls perfectly in the space between two notes. (Jazz is all about the horns you’re not honking, baby.)

    What makes this all so magical to me, and why I’ve listened to it hundreds of times over the past few years, is that it’s just as much a recording of a place as it is of a performance. As we all adjust to life for the foreseeable future as a primarily indoor species, the ability to project ourselves outdoors seems vital. Maybe you do this by reading, or by stewarding desert islands of sassy talking animals, or by watching musicians sing to you live on Instagram as you squint into the background to see how messy their living rooms are. I’ve been doing all of those things too, but I’ve also been returning to this music—finding a spare seat outside a bar on a warm spring night somewhere in Berlin, and listening to a stranger conduct a concerto for piano, bird, and car horn.

    I’ve always thought of music as an affordable method of time travel; turns out it also makes for a serviceable teleportation device.

    — Jez Burrows
    Seattle, day 16

    Link to article and Track

    Jez Burrows is a designer, illustrator, and the author of And Introducing, and Dictionary Stories: Short Fictions and Other Findings. jezburrows.com
    Interesting....yes it is proved that having music with a background in a restaurant or in nature has a relaxing effect

    there is an app that can give you this effect if you are interested

    Sleepa: Relaxing sounds, Sleep...you can customize the sounds you want and adjust the volume of each
     
    fidelio

    fidelio

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Interesting....yes it is proved that having music with a background in a restaurant or in nature has a relaxing effect

    there is an app that can give you this effect if you are interested

    Sleepa: Relaxing sounds, Sleep...you can customize the sounds you want and adjust the volume of each
    It's amazing how the sounds in themselves are a way to open the angle of imagination and perception. Something to say about the echolocation article you posted in another thread. Now it's full circle.
     
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