Iran on the rise: Militarily, Technologically and Strategically. Did 40 years of US sanctions hurt or help?

proIsrael-nonIsraeli

Legendary Member
Don’t know, I’m under the impression Trump is the one who gambled with the Iran Nuclear deal…

"gambled" is not a word I'd use.
"sober approach" is more precise term for you cannot have agreement with perpetually lying Iranian brass.

Still, be it as it may, there were no problems reported "before February" as opus claims - apparently whatever Trump was doing was working.
 

Viral

Active Member
Some irony in here. Iran under siege and blockade for over 40 years is now the one exporting instead of importing arms...



Iran sends warship on rare Atlantic mission amid Venezuela speculation

The destroyer Sahand and the intelligence-gathering vessel Makran departed last month


Destroyer

Iranian state TV released a short clip of the destroyer cruising through the Atlantic’s rough seas. Photograph: AP
AP

Thu 10 Jun 2021 17.59 EDT

An Iranian destroyer and support vessel are now sailing in the Atlantic Ocean on a rare mission far from the Islamic Republic, Iran’s state TV has reported, amid speculation that the ships could be bound for Venezuela.
The destroyer Sahand and the intelligence-gathering vessel Makran departed last month from Iran’s southern port of Bandar Abbas, said Adm Habibollah Sayyari, Iran’s deputy army chief, on Thursday. He described the mission as the Iranian navy’s longest and most challenging voyage yet, without elaborating.

Iranian state TV released a short clip of the destroyer cruising through the Atlantic’s rough seas. The video was most likely shot from the Makran, a converted commercial oil tanker with a mobile launch platform for helicopters.

“The navy is improving its seafaring capacity and proving its long-term durability in unfavourable seas and the Atlantic’s unfavourable weather conditions,” Sayyari said, adding that the warships would not call at any other ports during the mission.
Images from Maxar Technologies dated 28 April appear to show seven Iranian fast-attack craft typically associated with its paramilitary Revolutionary Guard on the deck of the Makran. Satellite images from Planet Labs Inc suggest it left a port at Bandar Abbas some time after 29 April. It is not known exactly where the Makran and the destroyer are now.
In late May, the website Politico cited anonymous officials as suggesting that the ships’ final destination may be Venezuela. Iran maintains close ties with the Venezuelan president, Nicolás Maduro, and has shipped gasoline and other products to the country amid a US sanctions campaign targeting fuel-starved Caracas. Venezuela is believed to have paid Iran, under US sanctions of its own, for the shipments.
During a news conference on 31 May, Iranian foreign ministry spokesperson Saeed Khatibzadeh declined to say where the Makran was going.
“Iran is always present in international waters and it has this right based on international law and it can be present in international waters,” he said. “No country is able to violate this right, and I warn that no one makes miscalculations. Those who sit in glass houses should be careful.”
The fast-attack craft aboard the Makran are the type that the Guard uses in its tense encounters with US warships in the Persian Gulf and its narrow mouth, the strait of Hormuz. It’s not immediately clear what Venezuela’s plans would be for those ships.
“If the boats are delivered, they may form the core of an asymmetrical warfare force within Venezuela’s armed forces,” the US Naval Institute said in an earlier published analysis. “This could be focused on disrupting shipping as a means of countering superior naval forces. Shipping routes to and from the Panama Canal are near the Venezuelan coast.”
Earlier this month, fires sank Iran’s largest warship, the 207-meter (679-foot) Kharg, which was used to resupply other ships in the fleet at sea and conduct training exercises. Officials offered no cause for the blaze, which followed a series of mysterious explosions that began in 2019 targeting commercial ships in Middle Eastern waterways.
The unusual voyage comes ahead of Iran’s 18 June presidential election, which will see voters select a successor to the relatively moderate incumbent president, Hassan Rouhani.
 

Viral

Active Member
If this is not terrorism what is?


Ex-Mossad chief indicates Israel was behind Iranian nuclear facility explosion and military scientist assassination

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Speaking after retiring last week, Yossi Cohen used an interview to imply that Israel was behind the explosion at an Iranian nuclear facility and the assassination of one of its nuclear scientists, and issued a warning to Tehran.
Last July, Iran’s Natanz nuclear facility was targeted by an explosion that ripped through its advanced centrifuge assembly, with Tehran quickly accusing Israel of being behind the attack. A similar explosion was reported to have completely destroyed the power system inside another Iranian underground nuclear facility earlier this year.
In November 2020, Iran’s nuclear program suffered another blow, when one of its top nuclear scientists, Mohsen Fakhrizadeh, was assassinated by an automated machine gun. Again, Mossad was accused of being responsible for the attack at the time, with Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif stating there were “serious indications” Israel was behind it.
Discussing the two incidents, Cohen, who served as Mossad director from 2016 until last week, suggested that his agency had been behind the attacks, although he stopped short of a clear confession for either.
We say very clearly [to Iran]: we won’t let you get nuclear weapons. What don’t you understand?
Addressing the assassination of Fakhrizadeh, Cohen confessed that the Iranian scientist had been a target for intelligence gathering by Mossad “for many years,” as Israel was “most troubled” by his work on Tehran’s nuclear program. The interviewer followed these remarks by claiming that “Yossi Cohen cannot take responsibility for this action, but his personal signature is on the entire operation.”
However, the ex-Mossad chief did brag to the interviewer that the Natanz facility didn’t “look like it used to,” after the explosion crippled its centrifuges. The news report was accompanied by the interviewer Ilan Dayan’s detailed explanation of how the Israeli agency got the explosives into the facility, although his claims haven’t been publicly confirmed by Tel Aviv and it’s not clear where he acquired this information.
Alongside his comments on the attacks, Cohen seemingly issued an open invitation to any Iranian scientists who might wish to leave Tehran’s nuclear program, stating that Israel sometimes offered a way out to those who were “willing to change career.”
ALSO ON RT.COMIsrael denied involvement in the killing of Iran's general Soleimani, but a new report says it helped the US in the assassination
While Mossad is usually known for its discretion, Cohen took the opportunity to issue a warning to Iran and scientists working in its nuclear program that they would be targeted if they continued with their activities.
Using the interview to directly address the Iranian leadership, Cohen declared it had been “infiltrated,” that Israel was watching its activities and that “the era of lies is over.”
Cohen’s replacement at Mossad, David Barnea, and the Israeli government have not responded to the TV interview or confirmed the agency’s involvement in the attacks. Iran has not responded to the former Mossad chief’s comments either.
 

Picasso

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
Some irony in here. Iran under siege and blockade for over 40 years is now the one exporting instead of importing arms...



Iran sends warship on rare Atlantic mission amid Venezuela speculation

The destroyer Sahand and the intelligence-gathering vessel Makran departed last month


Destroyer

Iranian state TV released a short clip of the destroyer cruising through the Atlantic’s rough seas. Photograph: AP
AP

Thu 10 Jun 2021 17.59 EDT

An Iranian destroyer and support vessel are now sailing in the Atlantic Ocean on a rare mission far from the Islamic Republic, Iran’s state TV has reported, amid speculation that the ships could be bound for Venezuela.
The destroyer Sahand and the intelligence-gathering vessel Makran departed last month from Iran’s southern port of Bandar Abbas, said Adm Habibollah Sayyari, Iran’s deputy army chief, on Thursday. He described the mission as the Iranian navy’s longest and most challenging voyage yet, without elaborating.

Iranian state TV released a short clip of the destroyer cruising through the Atlantic’s rough seas. The video was most likely shot from the Makran, a converted commercial oil tanker with a mobile launch platform for helicopters.

“The navy is improving its seafaring capacity and proving its long-term durability in unfavourable seas and the Atlantic’s unfavourable weather conditions,” Sayyari said, adding that the warships would not call at any other ports during the mission.
Images from Maxar Technologies dated 28 April appear to show seven Iranian fast-attack craft typically associated with its paramilitary Revolutionary Guard on the deck of the Makran. Satellite images from Planet Labs Inc suggest it left a port at Bandar Abbas some time after 29 April. It is not known exactly where the Makran and the destroyer are now.
In late May, the website Politico cited anonymous officials as suggesting that the ships’ final destination may be Venezuela. Iran maintains close ties with the Venezuelan president, Nicolás Maduro, and has shipped gasoline and other products to the country amid a US sanctions campaign targeting fuel-starved Caracas. Venezuela is believed to have paid Iran, under US sanctions of its own, for the shipments.
During a news conference on 31 May, Iranian foreign ministry spokesperson Saeed Khatibzadeh declined to say where the Makran was going.
“Iran is always present in international waters and it has this right based on international law and it can be present in international waters,” he said. “No country is able to violate this right, and I warn that no one makes miscalculations. Those who sit in glass houses should be careful.”
The fast-attack craft aboard the Makran are the type that the Guard uses in its tense encounters with US warships in the Persian Gulf and its narrow mouth, the strait of Hormuz. It’s not immediately clear what Venezuela’s plans would be for those ships.
“If the boats are delivered, they may form the core of an asymmetrical warfare force within Venezuela’s armed forces,” the US Naval Institute said in an earlier published analysis. “This could be focused on disrupting shipping as a means of countering superior naval forces. Shipping routes to and from the Panama Canal are near the Venezuelan coast.”
Earlier this month, fires sank Iran’s largest warship, the 207-meter (679-foot) Kharg, which was used to resupply other ships in the fleet at sea and conduct training exercises. Officials offered no cause for the blaze, which followed a series of mysterious explosions that began in 2019 targeting commercial ships in Middle Eastern waterways.
The unusual voyage comes ahead of Iran’s 18 June presidential election, which will see voters select a successor to the relatively moderate incumbent president, Hassan Rouhani.

One warship sent alone?

The US sends a fleet, "w idon 3a albon"!

You are embarrassing yourself!
 

NewLeb

Active Member
Some irony in here. Iran under siege and blockade for over 40 years is now the one exporting instead of importing arms...

So I suppose then that the sanctions are not as “cruel” and “inhuman” as Iran and its sponsers constantly whine about?
 

Rockies

New Member
If this is not terrorism what is?


Ex-Mossad chief indicates Israel was behind Iranian nuclear facility explosion and military scientist assassination

View attachment 23872


Speaking after retiring last week, Yossi Cohen used an interview to imply that Israel was behind the explosion at an Iranian nuclear facility and the assassination of one of its nuclear scientists, and issued a warning to Tehran.
Last July, Iran’s Natanz nuclear facility was targeted by an explosion that ripped through its advanced centrifuge assembly, with Tehran quickly accusing Israel of being behind the attack. A similar explosion was reported to have completely destroyed the power system inside another Iranian underground nuclear facility earlier this year.
In November 2020, Iran’s nuclear program suffered another blow, when one of its top nuclear scientists, Mohsen Fakhrizadeh, was assassinated by an automated machine gun. Again, Mossad was accused of being responsible for the attack at the time, with Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif stating there were “serious indications” Israel was behind it.
Discussing the two incidents, Cohen, who served as Mossad director from 2016 until last week, suggested that his agency had been behind the attacks, although he stopped short of a clear confession for either.

Addressing the assassination of Fakhrizadeh, Cohen confessed that the Iranian scientist had been a target for intelligence gathering by Mossad “for many years,” as Israel was “most troubled” by his work on Tehran’s nuclear program. The interviewer followed these remarks by claiming that “Yossi Cohen cannot take responsibility for this action, but his personal signature is on the entire operation.”
However, the ex-Mossad chief did brag to the interviewer that the Natanz facility didn’t “look like it used to,” after the explosion crippled its centrifuges. The news report was accompanied by the interviewer Ilan Dayan’s detailed explanation of how the Israeli agency got the explosives into the facility, although his claims haven’t been publicly confirmed by Tel Aviv and it’s not clear where he acquired this information.
Alongside his comments on the attacks, Cohen seemingly issued an open invitation to any Iranian scientists who might wish to leave Tehran’s nuclear program, stating that Israel sometimes offered a way out to those who were “willing to change career.”
ALSO ON RT.COMIsrael denied involvement in the killing of Iran's general Soleimani, but a new report says it helped the US in the assassination
While Mossad is usually known for its discretion, Cohen took the opportunity to issue a warning to Iran and scientists working in its nuclear program that they would be targeted if they continued with their activities.
Using the interview to directly address the Iranian leadership, Cohen declared it had been “infiltrated,” that Israel was watching its activities and that “the era of lies is over.”
Cohen’s replacement at Mossad, David Barnea, and the Israeli government have not responded to the TV interview or confirmed the agency’s involvement in the attacks. Iran has not responded to the former Mossad chief’s comments either.
That is called protecting national interests, a concept that does not exist in lebanon
 

Viral

Active Member

U.S. Lifts Some Iran Sanctions Amid Stalled Nuclear Talks

Administration official says there is no connection between the administrative move and Vienna negotiations​


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The Biden administration lifted sanctions on three former Iranian officials and several energy companies amid stalled nuclear negotiations, signaling Washington’s willingness to further ease economic pressure on Iran if the country changes course.

The U.S. Treasury Department on Thursday repealed sanctions on former senior National Iranian Oil Co. officials and several companies involved in shipping and trading petrochemical products. The administration described the moves as routine administrative actions, saying the officials were removed from U.S. blacklists because they no longer held positions in the sanctioned entities.

But officials familiar with talks under way in Vienna on the future of the 2015 multilateral Iran nuclear agreement said the Biden administration has been looking at how it could inject momentum into the negotiations. Oil prices tumbled nearly 2% after the news, but quickly regained their losses, continuing to trade over $70 a barrel.
“These actions demonstrate our commitment to lifting sanctions in the event of a change in status or behavior by sanctioned persons,” Secretary of State Antony Blinken said in a statement accompanying the notice of the action.

The actions came as U.S., Iranian, European and Chinese negotiators in Vienna are preparing to start a sixth round of talks to restore the 2015 nuclear deal with Iran, the U.S. and five other world powers. Discussions are expected to start up again this weekend in Vienna, according to people involved in the negotiations.
State Department spokesman Ned Price told reporters later Thursday that the actions have “absolutely no connection” to ongoing negotiations on the nuclear agreement. A Treasury official also said, “This is not a wider easing of sanctions on the oil sector of Iran.”
The Iranian mission to the United Nations didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.
U.S. and European officials have said significant differences remain between Washington and Tehran over how to restore the nuclear deal, including the extent of any potential sanctions relief.
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Negotiations have been taking place in Vienna.​

PHOTO: LISA LEUTNER/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Completed in 2015, the nuclear agreement known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action lifted international economic sanctions on Iran in exchange for temporary constraints on the country’s nuclear program.
In 2018, President Trump withdrew the U.S. from the deal, calling it one-sided and arguing it supplied Iran with funding Tehran directed to its military, weapons programs and to militant groups elsewhere in the region.
In an effort to push Iran back to the negotiating table for a stricter deal, the Trump administration reimposed sweeping sanctions on Tehran, hitting every major export sector and helping pitch the country into a deep economic depression.
Besides the oil and banking sectors, the sanctions also included the shipping, construction, auto, and metal industries and targeted hundreds of Iranian officials, financial trusts and companies by name. They effectively froze most international business dealings with Iran, threatening U.S. and foreign companies if they traded with Iran, including purchasing Iranian oil, natural gas or petrochemical products.

Iran has remained a party to the deal, even while steadily breaching many of its limits, including on uranium enrichment. The country has consistently demanded the U.S. lift nearly all sanctions upfront before it brings its nuclear activities back in line with the 2015 agreement. The other parties to the deal, China, France, Germany, Russia and the U.K., remain in it.
The Vienna negotiations now look very likely to drift past Iran’s presidential elections on June 18, which some Western officials saw as a target date to complete the talks because of their potential effect on Iran’s position.
U.S. officials have said they would be prepared to lift most sanctions on Iran’s oil, petrochemical and shipping sectors as part of a deal to restore the 2015 nuclear agreement. So far, the U.S. has insisted it will maintain other antiterrorism sanctions, including on the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, a paramilitary group that retains significant influence on Iran’s government, economy and foreign policy. Indeed on Thursday, even as it lifted some sanctions the U.S. also levied new ones against a group of men and companies that U.S. officials said are helping fund the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps and Houthi rebels in Yemen.
Critics of the administration’s Iran policy say Thursday’s lifting of sanctions would undermine Washington’s leverage over Iran in the talks.
Iran’s Nuclear Program: What We Know About Tehran’s Key Sites





Iran’s Nuclear Program: What We Know About Tehran’s Key Sites

Iran’s Nuclear Program: What We Know About Tehran’s Key Sites
While Iran says it isn’t trying to build nuclear weapons, a look at its key facilities suggests it could develop the technology to make them. WSJ breaks down Tehran’s capabilities as it hits new milestones in uranium enrichment and limits access to inspectors. Photo illustration: George Downs
“Lifting sanctions during negotiations shows weakness to Iran and tells Tehran to continue its nefarious activities, including nuclear extortion and sending conventional arms to U.S. adversaries,” said Anthony Ruggiero, a former top national security adviser to President Trump now at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies, a think tank that advocated for tougher sanctions.
Several Republican lawmakers said the action confirmed their fears about the Biden administration’s Iran policy.

“The Biden admin is rushing to dismantle sanctions on Iran, including and especially their oil industry and shipping, before even the pretense of a deal,” said Sen. Ted Cruz, (R., Tx.), in a tweet from his official account. “What happened to Biden’s promise not to give the Ayatollah unilateral concessions?”
Thursday’s moves represent a sliver of the broad spectrum of Iranian sanctions and aren’t expected to yield any significant financial or economic relief to the country. Combined with the significant differences that remain between the parties negotiating in Vienna on how to restore the 2015 deal, the sanction removals themselves aren’t expected to break the existing impasse.
Still, deletions from Iran sanction rolls are relatively rare, according to data available on the Treasury Department’s website, with less than a handful in recent years. The last removal—in January last year—involved a major Chinese shipping company that vowed to no longer handle Iranian cargoes.
Thursday’s action, therefore, signals to Iran that the Biden administration not only has a willingness to act, but the administrative and legal capability to do so, analysts said.
The NIOC officials were sanctioned in 2013 for allegedly evading sanctions levied against the Iranian government as the Obama administration sought to press Tehran into a nuclear deal. U.S. officials at the time said the action was aimed at disrupting Iran’s nuclear and weapons programs. The companies that were removed Thursday were blacklisted in 2020 for allegedly helping Iran’s sanctioned petrochemical trade, which the Trump administration said Iran’s government used to help it finance groups designated by the U.S. as terrorists.
 

Viral

Active Member

Iran says its naval vessels have reached the Atlantic for the first time

By Mostafa Salem, Hamdi Alkhshali and Vasco Cotovio, CNN
Updated 8:42 AM ET, Fri June 11, 2021

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The Iranian ship Makran is seen in this Maxar Technologies satellite image from early May in the Persian Gulf around Larak Island. The boat appears loaded with seven small fast-attack boats on its deck.

(CNN)An Iranian navy destroyer ship has reached the Atlantic Ocean, Iran's deputy army commander, Admiral Habibullah Sayyari said, according to official news agency IRNA.
Accompanied by a logistical vessel, the ship's voyage marks the first time Iran has been able to reach the Atlantic using naval vessels without docking in any international ports, Sayyari said. The ships set sail over a month ago from the port of Bandar Abbas in Iran, he added.
The ships, a destroyer named "Sahand" and a logistics vessel called "Makran," are being monitored by the US, and the intelligence community is working to assess what Iran's intentions are.
"The 77th strategic naval fleet of the Navy, comprising of the 'Sahand' destroyer and the 'Makran' ship, is present in the Atlantic Ocean for the first time to demonstrate the capabilities of Iran in the maritime arena," Sayyari said.
Satellite imagery reveals one of them is carrying a type of small, fast-attack boats that Iran has used to harass US naval ships in the Persian Gulf. However, multiple US officials told CNN last week that it is unclear if the ships are carrying any weapons.

The "Makran," seen here in another Maxar Technologies satellite image from late April when it was docked in the Iranian port of Bandar Abbas.


The "Makran," seen here in another Maxar Technologies satellite image from late April when it was docked in the Iranian port of Bandar Abbas.
Tehran has not said where the ships are headed, but they may be going to Venezuela, a US-sanctioned, but important trade partner to Iran.
"Navigating in international waters is a legitimate right of the Iranian army's strategic navy, and we will continue this path with full force and power," Sayyari said according to IRNA.
"The fleet continues on its longest naval mission to the North Atlantic," he added,
Iran has repeated its intention of sending navy warships to the Atlantic over the past few years.
In 2018 and 2019, Iranian navy officials issued statements to state media on plans to send the "Sahand" to the Atlantic. But until now, the plans never materialized.
The voyage comes just weeks after one of the largest vessels in the Iranian navy caught fire and sank in the Gulf of Oman.
 

Viral

Active Member

Russia prepping to give Iran advanced satellite system that will boost military spying capabilities



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Russia is prepping to give Iran an advanced satellite system that would boost its military spying capabilities, current and former U.S. and Middle Eastern officials with knowledge of the situation told The Washington Post.

The Russian-made Kanopus-V satellite with Russian hardware would be launched in Russia with Iran being able to use the satellite to spy on any targets, including U.S. troops in Iraq and military bases in Israel, whenever the country wanted.

The satellite would have a camera resolution of 1.2 meters and would greatly improve the country’s spying capabilities, the three officials who spoke to The Post said.


Since 2018 Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps has made trips to Russia to negotiate this deal, and experts from Russia have gone to Iran to train the country's crews on how to operate the satellite, according to the officials.

The officials said the satellite could be launched in the next few months.

One official says there are concerns Iran will share the satellite information with Iranian militia groups.

The U.S. said Thursday that it would place sanctions on an international network that has ties to one of the militia groups, the Houthi rebels.

The news comes ahead of a highly anticipated first meeting between President Biden and Russian President Vladimir Putin.

The Hill has reached out to the Pentagon for comment.
 

Viral

Active Member

Iran says it’s reached agreement with US on lifting of Trump-era economic sanctions​


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Iran’s Foreign Ministry says it has finally reached a deal with the US, meaning all the sanctions imposed on the country’s industrial sectors, including energy, will be removed.

A breakthrough in Vienna will bring much-anticipated relief to the Iranian oil sector, which has been officially cut from the global energy market.
“Some minute technical, political, legal, and practical issues remain,” Saeed Khatibzadeh, spokesman for the ministry said, adding “No task was impossible for the negotiators, and there’s no impasse.”

Severe sectoral sanctions against Iran were introduced by the Trump administration, which was seeking to restrain the Iranian oil trade as part of its “maximum pressure campaign” to curtail the country’s nuclear ambitions. Washington threatened any country buying crude from Iran with secondary sanctions.
Apart from the ban on crude exports, US sanctions included restrictions on Iran’s petrochemicals, shipping, insurance, banking, car manufacturing, and construction sectors, along with prohibition on dollar transactions. Moreover, the US had imposed individual sanctions against Tehran officials – these were lifted last week.
The landmark accord should result in the dropping of penalties that once removed over two million barrels per day (bpd) of Iranian crude from international markets, pushing the nation’s output below two million bpd – the lowest since the beginning of the Iran-Iraq war in the early 1980s.

The two sides are still in talks to revive the 2015 nuclear deal, which promised to lift the remaining sanctions against Iran in exchange for Tehran curbing its nuclear program.
The pact was signed by Iran, China, France, Germany, Russia, the UK, and the US six years ago, but the Trump administration unilaterally withdrew the US from the agreement. Tehran responded by reneging on its commitments under the deal, including enriching uranium.
Khatibzadeh warned there was “very little time left” for world powers to revive the nuclear deal.
 

Viral

Active Member

Iran’s navy launches new indigenous destroyer and minehunter (VIDEO)​


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Iran has welcomed two new vessels to its navy – the Iranian-made Dena destroyer and Shahin minehunter – during a ceremony at Bandar Abbas port. The launch comes after Iran sailed two warships into the Atlantic for the first time.
On Monday, during a ceremony at the port of Bandar Abbas on the Persian Gulf, two indigenously developed warships were launched into the sea. The ceremony was attended by the top brass of the armed forces, including Minister of Defense Amir Hatami.
The semi-official Iranian news agency Mehr said the Dena destroyer was designed and built by experts within the Ministry of Defense and Armed Forces Logistics. The all-Iranian vessel weighs more than 1,300 tons, and is 11 meters wide and 94 meters long. It has been equipped with a variety of indigenous hardware, including a 76mm cannon, four cruise missiles and two torpedo launchers, and has a landing deck for helicopters.
Despite being classed as a ‘destroyer’ in Iran, the Dena is considerably smaller than Western analogues. For example, the UK Royal Navy’s Daring class destroyers are 152 meters long and have a displacement of 7,350 to 8,500 tons. The Dena is more comparable in size with a Royal Navy river-class offshore patrol vessel. The Iranian warship is the fourth in its class to be launched.

The minehunter Shahin, meaning hawk, has a length of 33 meters and a width of 11 meters. The ship will assist with operations concerning the tracking and disposal of mines.
On Thursday last week, the Iranian navy announced that two vessels, both indigenously developed, had reached the Atlantic Ocean for the first time, following a nearly 6,000-nautical-mile journey.
US Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin said the presence of the two vessels in the Atlantic, amid reports they were heading to Venezuela to complete an arms deal, was of “great concern.”

ALSO ON RT.COMIran military vessels enter Atlantic Ocean for first time (VIDEO)
 

Viral

Active Member
Apparently the Iranians made a good choice for their country and their future...
You can tell it's true when the West doesn't like it...



As Iran veers right, ties with Gulf Arabs may hinge on nuclear pact


DUBAI, June 19 (Reuters) - Gulf Arab states are unlikely to be deterred from dialogue to improve ties with Iran after a hardline judge won the presidency but their talks with Tehran might become tougher, analysts said.

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Prospects for better relations between Muslim Shi'ite Iran and Sunni Gulf Arab monarchies could ultimately hinge on progress to revive Tehran's 2015 nuclear accord with world powers, they said, after Ebrahim Raisi won Friday's election.


The Iranian judge and cleric, who is subject to U.S. sanctions, takes office in August, while nuclear talks in Vienna under outgoing President Hassan Rouhani, a more pragmatic cleric, are ongoing.

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Saudi Arabia and Iran, longtime regional foes, began direct talks in April to contain tensions at the same time as global powers have been embroiled in nuclear negotiations.

"Iran has now sent a clear message that they are tilting to a more radical, more conservative position," said Abdulkhaleq Abdulla, a UAE political analyst, adding that Raisi's election might make improving Gulf ties a tougher challenge.

"Nevertheless, Iran is not in a position to become more radical ... because the region is becoming very difficult and very dangerous," he added.

The United Arab Emirates, whose commercial hub Dubai has been a trade gateway for Iran, and Oman, which has often played a regional mediation role, were swift to congratulate Raisi.

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Saudi Arabia has yet to comment.


Raisi, an implacable critic of the West and an ally of Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, who holds ultimate power in Iran, has voiced support for continuing the nuclear negotiations.

"If the Vienna talks succeed and there is a better situation with America, then (with) hardliners in power, who are close to the supreme leader, the situation may improve," said Abdulaziz Sager, chairman of Gulf Research Center.


LEVERAGE

A revived nuclear deal and the lifting of U.S. sanctions on the Islamic Republic would boost Raisi, easing Iran's economic crisis and offering leverage in Gulf talks, said Jean-Marc Rickli, an analyst at Geneva Centre for Security Policy.

Neither Iran nor Gulf Arabs want a return to the kind of tensions seen in 2019 that spiralled after the U.S. killing, under former U.S. President Donald Trump, of top Iranian general Qassem Soleimani. Gulf states blamed Iran or its proxies for a spate of attacks on oil tankers and Saudi oil plants.


A perception that Washington was now disengaging militarily from the area under U.S. President Joe Biden has prompted a more pragmatic Gulf approach, analysts said.

Nevertheless, Biden has demanded Iran rein in its missile programme and end its support for proxies in the region, such as Hezbollah in Lebanon and the Houthi movement in Yemen, demands that have strong support from Gulf Arab nations.

"The Saudis have realised they can no longer rely on the Americans for their security ... and have seen that Iran has the means to really put pressure on the kingdom through direct attacks and also with the quagmire of Yemen," Rickli said.

Saudi-Iran talks have focused mainly on Yemen, where a military campaign led by Riyadh against the Iran-aligned Houthi movement for over six years no longer has U.S. backing.


The UAE has maintained contacts with Tehran since 2019, while also forging ties with Israel, Iran's arch regional foe.

Sanam Vakil, an analyst at Britain’s Chatham House, wrote last week that regional conversations, particularly on maritime security, were expected to continue but “can only gain momentum if Tehran demonstrates meaningful goodwill”.
 
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