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Is Europe paying the price for America’s Project in the Middle East?

proIsrael-nonIsraeli

Legendary Member
How sad...

Denmark launches anti-migrant ad campaign

The Independent | Video

The Danish immigration ministry has placed adverts in leading Lebanese newspapers to discourage refugees from heading to Denmark. #Denmark runs adverts in #Lebanon newspapers warning would-be #refugees to stay away https:/

It may be sad, but is is also good.

It was easy to make themselves feel good at Israel's expense, but now Europe has to put its money where its mouth is and looks like Europe is not ready to do so.
 

nonsense

Legendary Member
It may be sad, but is is also good.

It was easy to make themselves feel good at Israel's expense, but now Europe has to put its money where its mouth is and looks like Europe is not ready to do so.

Everywhere there are people doing evil and exploiting the weak. Unfortunately Israel is doing plenty of that too. Power corrupts. But humanity is not going down without a fight.
 

J. Abizeid

Well-Known Member
Europe - Paris reels after multiple terror attacks - France 24


At least 120 people were killed in a wave of simultaneous attacks on Friday evening in Paris, in the deadliest violence to strike France since World War II.


Gunmen and bombers attacked busy restaurants, bars and a concert hall at six locations around Paris on Friday evening, killing scores of people in what a shaken President François Hollande described as an unprecedented terrorist attack.

The apparently coordinated gun and bomb assault came as the country, a founder member of the US-led coalition waging air strikes against Islamic State group fighters in Syria and Iraq, was on high alert for terrorist attacks ahead of a global climate conference due to open later this month.

Hollande, who was attending an international football match with German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier when several explosions took place outside the national stadium, declared a state of emergency in the Paris region and announced the closure of France's borders to stop perpetrators escaping.

"This is a horror," the visibly shaken president said in a midnight television address to the nation before chairing an emergency cabinet meeting.

All emergency services were mobilised, police leave was cancelled and hospitals recalled staff to cope with the casualties.

A Reuters witness heard five explosions outside the Bataclan music hall, where up to 118 people were estimated to be dead and reports said armed attackers had shot concertgoers one by one before elite police units stormed the building and killed four attackers.

One official described "carnage" inside the building, saying the attackers had tossed explosives at the hostages, adding that he expected the toll of victims to rise.

The Bataclan lies just 200 metres from the former offices of Charlie Hebdo magazine, which was one of the targets of the January 2015 attacks.

Earlier, witnesses said an elite anti-terror unit had taken up positions outside the popular concert venue, which was attacked by two or three gunmen, who were reported to have shouted slogans condemning France's role in Syria.

"We know where these attacks come from," Hollande said, without naming any individual group. "There are indeed good reasons to be afraid."

Ordinary people targeted

France has been on edge since January when Islamist extremists attacked the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, which had run cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed, and a kosher supermarket.

The Charlie Hebdo attackers claimed links to extremists in Yemen, while the kosher market attacker claimed ties to the Islamic State group.

This time, the militants targeted young people enjoying a rock concert and ordinary city residents enjoying a Friday night out.

In addition to the deaths at the concert hall, police said 11 people were killed in the popular Carillon bar in the 10th arrondissement and other officials said at least three people died when bombs went off outside the Stade de France stadium in northern Paris during a France-Germany football match.

Paris prosecutor François Molins added that a further 18 people had been killed on the Boulevard de Charonne, one on Boulevard Voltaire and five on Rue de la Fontaine-au-Roi.

Emilio Macchio, from Ravenna, Italy, was at the Carillon bar, having a beer on the pavement, when the shooting started. He said he didn't see any gunmen or victims, but hid behind a corner, then ran away.

"It sounded like fireworks," he said.

The Carillon and the Bataclan are popular venues in eastern Paris, near the trendy Oberkampf area which is known for its vibrant nightlife.

France has seen several smaller-scale attacks or attempts since January, including an incident on a high-speed train in August in which American travellers thwarted an attempted attack by a heavily armed man.


© AFP/ MIGUEL MEDINA | Rescuers evacuate an injured person on Boulevard des Filles du Calvaire, close to the Bataclan concert hall in central Paris, early on November 14, 2015
 

NMA

Well-Known Member
Civilian Russian taken down
Attacks on defenseless civilians in Beirut
Attacks on defenseless civilians in Paris.



[]
 
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J. Abizeid

Well-Known Member
Civilian Russian taken down
Attacks on defenseless civilians in Beirut
Attacks on defenseless civilians in Paris.



[].
True!
Which brings us back to the title of the thread.
There was no ISIS before the illegal and criminal invasion of Iraq and the illegal and criminal involvement in Libya and Syria. Al-Qaida was limited to Afghanistan; even those who claim Iran a radical Muslim country needless to remind them Iran was a secular and democratic country until the CIA overthrew its democratically elected leader Mosaddegh in 1953 and replaced him with the Shah, a ruthless dictator that gave the people no other option but to embrace the Khomeini and the rest is history...
 
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proIsrael-nonIsraeli

Legendary Member
True!
Which brings us back to the title of the thread.
There was no ISIS before the illegal and criminal invasion of Iraq and the illegal and criminal involvement in Libya and Syria. Al-Qaida was limited to Afghanistan; even those who claim Iran a radical Muslim country needless to remind them Iran was a secular and democratic country until the CIA overthrew its democratically elected leader Mosaddegh in 1953 and replaced him with the Shah, a ruthless dictator that gave the people no other option but to embrace the Khomeini and the rest is history...

Do not pick and choose, do not stop at 1953 - you need to start with 7th century.

There was no ISIS before creation of Islam and illegal and criminal Muslim invasion of the Middle East, North Africa, and good part of Europe.
 

cedarheart

Legendary Member
To go back to the question in the title of this thread: "is Europe paying the price for America's Project in the Middle East?"

My short and clear answer is NO.
Europe approved and took part in this project, thus it's paying the price for it's actions.

Nevertheless, don't get me wrong, this doesn't mean that Europeans deserve this, just like the middle easterns don't deserve what is happening to them.
 

J. Abizeid

Well-Known Member
To go back to the question in the title of this thread: "is Europe paying the price for America's Project in the Middle East?"

My short and clear answer is NO.
Europe approved and took part in this project, thus it's paying the price for it's actions.

Nevertheless, don't get me wrong, this doesn't mean that Europeans deserve this, just like the middle easterns don't deserve what is happening to them.
The price that innocent masses are paying all over the world be it in the Middle East, Europe or the US, is the price of IGNORANCE!
The oldest trick in humanity "divide and conquer " is well and alive everywhere. Read through out the forum and notice the mass ignorance generating anger, bigotry and hatred. We are quick at blaming the subdued Muslims for their lack of condemnation for Paris attacks but we fail to acknowledge our own lack of condemnation against what Western governments' perpetual war crimes against the brown and non Christian man all over the world.
We are too oblivious to what France did to the Libyan people. Their misery is not even in the news anymore. Al the news wanted to talk about lately "fixing Syria's problem" a la Iraq and Libya after they failed "fixing Iran"... Yet the world is too ignorant and somewhat hypocrite to confront the Western sinister motives because until now, the French for example, didn't realize their government ****ing up other people's lives on different continent was their problem.
And that my friend is called IGNORANCE!
 

J. Abizeid

Well-Known Member
Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan urged world leaders on Saturday to prioritize the fight against terrorism as they gathered for a summit in southwestern Turkey, saying the Paris attacks claimed by Islamic State showed the time for words was now over.
Read more at Reutershttp://Paris attack puts terrorism center-stage as world leaders meet in Turkey| Reuters

Hollande thanking Erdogan for his support ignoring the fact that Erdogan has been destroying the Kurds who are the real fighters against ISIS in Turkey...
BTW. Did anyone ask Erdogan why is he buying ISIS oil?
How bizarre and how insulting to the ignorant masses..
 

loubnaniTO

Legendary Member
Staff member
Super Penguin
To really combat terror, end support for Saudi Arabia

Owen Jones
Ramped up rhetoric on security makes no sense so long as the west cosies up to dictatorships that support fundamentalism


Prime Minister David Cameron at a news conference in Downing Street. 'As the British government ramps up the terror alert to 'severe' and yet more anti-terror legislation is proposed, some reflection after 13 years of disaster are surely needed.' Photograph: Paul Hackett/PA


Sunday 31 August 2014 19.30 BSTLast modified on Monday 1 September 2014 14.01 BS
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The so-called war on terror is nearly 13 years old, but which rational human being will be cheering its success? We’ve had crackdowns on civil liberties across the world, tabloid-fanned generalisations about Muslims and, of course, military interventions whose consequences have ranged from the disastrous to the catastrophic. And where have we ended up? Wars that Britons believe have made them less safe; jihadists too extreme even for al-Qaida’s tastes running amok in Iraq and Syria; and nations like Libya succumbing to Islamist militias. There are failures, and then there are calamities.

But as the British government ramps up the terror alert to “severe” and yet more anti-terror legislation is proposed, some reflection after 13 years of disaster is surely needed. One element has been missing, and that is the west’s relationship with Middle Eastern dictatorships that have played a pernicious role in the rise of Islamist fundamentalist terrorism. And no wonder: the west is militarily, economically and diplomatically allied with these often brutal regimes, and our media all too often reflects the foreign policy objectives of our governments.

Take Qatar. There is evidence that, as the US magazine The Atlantic puts it, “Qatar’s military and economic largesse has made its way to Jabhat al-Nusra”, an al-Qaida group operating in Syria. Less than two weeks ago, Germany’s development minister, Gerd Mueller, was slapped down after pointing the finger at Qatar for funding Islamic State (Isis).

While there is no evidence to suggest Qatar’s regime is directly funding Isis, powerful private individuals within the state certainly are, and arms intended for other jihadi groups are likely to have fallen into their hands. According to a secret memo signed by Hillary Clinton, released by Wikileaks, Qatar has the worst record of counter-terrorism cooperation with the US.

And yet, where are the western demands for Qatar to stop funding international terrorism or being complicit in the rise of jihadi groups? Instead, Britain arms Qatar’s dictatorship, selling it millions of pounds worth of weaponry including “crowd-control ammunition” and missile parts. There are other reasons for Britain to keep stumm, too. Qatar owns lucrative chunks of Britain such as the Shard, a big portion of Sainsbury’s and a slice of the London Stock Exchange.

Then there’s Kuwait, slammed by Amnesty International for curtailing freedom of expression, beating and torturing demonstrators and discriminating against women. Hundreds of millions have been channelled by wealthy Kuwaitis to Syria, again ending up with groups like Jabhat al-Nusra.

Kuwait has refused to ban the Revival of Islamic Heritage Society, a supposed charity designated by the US Treasuryas an al-Qaida bankroller. David Cohen, the US Treasury’s undersecretary for terrorism and financial intelligence, has even described Kuwait as the “epicentre of fundraising for terrorist groups in Syria”. As Kristian Coates Ulrichsen, an associate fellow at Chatham House, told me: “High profile Kuwaiti clerics were quite openly supporting groups like al-Nusra, using TV programmes in Kuwait to grandstand on it.” All of this is helped by lax laws on financing and money laundering, he says.

But don’t expect any concerted action from the British government. Kuwait is “an important British ally in the region”, as the British government officially puts it. Tony Blair has become the must-have accessory of every self-respecting dictator, ranging from Kazakhstan to Egypt; Kuwait was Tony Blair Associates’ first clientin a deal worth £27m. Britain has approved hundreds of arms licences to Kuwait since 2003, recently including military software and anti-riot shields.

And then, of course, there is the dictatorship in Saudi Arabia. Much of the world was rightly repulsed when Isis beheaded the courageous journalist James Foley. Note, then, that Saudi Arabia has beheaded 22 people since 4 August. Among the “crimes” that are punished with beheading are sorcery and drug trafficking.

Around 2,000 people have been killed since 1985, their decapitated corpses often left in public squares as a warning. According to Amnesty International, the death penalty “is so far removed from any kind of legal parameters that it is almost hard to believe”, with the use of torture to extract confessions commonplace. Shia Muslims are discriminated against and women are deprived of basic rights, having to seek permission from a man before they can even travel or take up paid work.

Even talking about atheism has been made a terrorist offence and in 2012, 25-year-old Hamza Kashgari was jailed for 20 months for tweeting about the prophet Muhammad. Here are the fruits of the pact between an opulent monarchy and a fanatical clergy.

This human rights abusing regime is deeply complicit in the rise of Islamist extremism too. Following the Soviet invasion, the export of the fundamentalist Saudi interpretation of Islam – Wahhabism – fused with Afghan Pashtun tribal code and helped to form the Taliban. The Saudi monarchy would end up suffering from blowback as al-Qaida eventually turned against the kingdom.

Chatham House professor Paul Stevens says: “For a long time, there was an unwritten agreement … whereby al-Qaida’s presence was tolerated in Saudi Arabia, but don’t piss inside the tent, piss outside.” Coates Ulrichsen warns that Saudi policy on Syria could be “Afghanistan on steroids”, as elements of the regime have turned a blind eye to where funding for anti-Assad rebels ends up.

Although Saudi Arabia has given $100m (£60m) to the UN anti-terror programme and the country’s grand mufti has denounced Isis as “enemy number one”, radical Salafists across the Middle East receive ideological and material backing from within the kingdom. According to Clinton’s leaked memo, Saudi donors constituted “the most significant source of funding to Sunni terrorist groups worldwide”.

But again, don’t expect Britain to act. Our alliance with the regime dates back to 1915, and Saudi Arabia is the British arms industry’s biggest market, receiving £1.6bn of military exports. There are now more than 200 joint ventures between UK and Saudi companies worth $17.5bn.

So much rhetoric about terrorism; so many calls to act. Yet Britain’s foreign policy demonstrates how empty such words are. Our allies are up to their necks in complicity with terrorism, but as long as there is money to be made and weapons to sell, our rulers’ lips will remain stubbornly sealed.
 

J. Abizeid

Well-Known Member
From Turkey With Love............................

847 shotguns seized in Italy en route from Turkey to Belgium — RT News

847 shotguns seized in Italy en route from Turkey to Belgium


© Pupia Crime / YouTube

A large cargo of shotguns without transportation permits has been seized by the Italian police at the Port of Trieste. The 847 Turkish-made Winchester shotguns worth about €500,000 were on their way to Belgium.


The weapons were declared along with other cargoes destined for Germany and the Netherlands on a Dutch-registered truck driven by a Turkish citizen. Gun shipments from Turkey are nothing new in Trieste, but this time the shipment was missing a key document: authorization for transportation in the EU.

The shipment consisted of 847 pump-action Winchester shotguns: 781 SXP 12-51 and 66 SXP 12-47 models, La Stampa reports.

“A major seizure,” the chief prosecutor of Trieste, Carlo Mastelloni, commented, stressing that the Guardia di Finanza (Financial Police) “have done well for encouraging controls in the port, a sensitive area that affects business in the commercial city of Trieste.”

Given the terror threat in Europe, the seizure in Trieste has drawn “an extremely high level of attention," said Lieutenant Colonel Gabriel Baron, commander of the Guardia di Finanza in Trieste.

Following the seizure, Trieste’s public prosecutor accused the Turkish exporter of unauthorized weapons’ trading.

The port in Trieste remains one of the largest gateways for European trade with Turkey.

“At this time we work as closely as possible on what passes through the port, which records 250,000 cargoes annually to and from Turkey,” according to Nicola Palladino, head of Trieste’s anti-fraud office.

This is not the first time European law enforcement has seized a shipment of Turkish-made weapons.

In September, the Hellenic Coast Guard of Greece intercepted two sea containers loaded with some 5,000 pump-action combat shotguns and nearly 500,000 rounds of US-made 9mm ammo, on the Haddad I cargo ship off the port of Heraklion in Crete.
The Haddad I departed from the Turkish port of Iskenderun and was heading to the Libyan city of Misrata. After intelligence services informed the Greek coastal guards about the ship’s cargo of guns, the vessel was intercepted south of Crete by the Open Sea Coast Patrol.
 

Republican

Legendary Member
Saudi must stop financing fundamentalist mosques abroad: Merkel's deputy


"BERLIN: German Vice Chancellor Sigmar Gabriel on Sunday said Saudi Arabia must stop financing fundamentalist mosques abroad which are accused of breeding extremism.

“From Saudi Arabia, Wahhabi mosques are financed throughout the world,” said Gabriel.

#SueMeSaudi goes viral after Saudi govt threatens to sue anyone comparing them to ISIS

“In Germany many extremists considered dangerous persons emerge from these communities,” he told the newspaperBild am Sonntag. ..."

"...“At the same time we must make it clear to the Saudis that the time of looking the other way is over,” said Gabriel, who is also economy minister.

Gabriel, head of the centre-left Social Democrats (SPD), urged decisive steps in Germany against radical mosques associated with Wahhabism.

Punisher-in-chiefs: How different are ISIS and Saudi Arabia really?

“This radical fundamentalism taking place in Salafist mosques is no less dangerous than right-wing extremism,” he said. ..."

Saudi must stop financing fundamentalist mosques abroad: Merkel's deputy - The Express Tribune

 

hola!

Member
Europe approved and took part in this project, thus it's paying the price for it's actions.

Nevertheless, don't get me wrong, this doesn't mean that Europeans deserve this, just like the middle easterns don't deserve what is happening to them.
Good point.
@Goku and co. Where do we go from there?
Spammers: Please stay clear of this thread and allow real intellects to discus the causes and solutions to Europe's dilemma.
 

hola!

Member
The price that innocent masses are paying all over the world be it in the Middle East, Europe or the US, is the price of IGNORANCE!
The oldest trick in humanity "divide and conquer " is well and alive everywhere. Read through out the forum and notice the mass ignorance generating anger, bigotry and hatred. We are quick at blaming the subdued Muslims for their lack of condemnation for Paris attacks but we fail to acknowledge our own lack of condemnation against what Western governments' perpetual war crimes against the brown and non Christian man all over the world.
We are too oblivious to what France did to the Libyan people. Their misery is not even in the news anymore. Al the news wanted to talk about lately "fixing Syria's problem" a la Iraq and Libya after they failed "fixing Iran"... Yet the world is too ignorant and somewhat hypocrite to confront the Western sinister motives because until now, the French for example, didn't realize their government ****ing up other people's lives on different continent was their problem.
And that my friend is called IGNORANCE!
This seems to be the main cause.
Unfortunately, the situation under the classic leadership of Europe is deteriorating.
Besides Muslim bashing on this forum, How do we effectively reverse the spreading of this phenomenon?
 
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