Is the CIA spy network "out of business"?

ecce homo

ecce homo

Well-Known Member
CIA forced to curb spying in Lebanon

By Ken Dilanian, Los Angeles Times


Reporting from Washington— The CIA was forced to curtail its spying in Lebanon, where U.S. operatives and their agents collect crucial intelligence on Syria, terrorist groups and other targets, after the arrests of several CIA informants in Beirut this year, according to U.S. officials and other sources.

"Beirut station is out of business," a source said, using the CIA term for its post there. The same source, who declined to be identified while speaking about a classified matter, alleged that up to a dozen CIA informants have been compromised, but U.S. officials disputed that figure.

U.S. officials acknowledged that some CIA operations were suspended in Beirut last summer. It's unclear whether full operations have resumed. Beirut is considered a key watching post for turmoil in the Middle East.

Senior CIA officials have briefed congressional staffers about the breach, and Rep. Mike Rogers (R-Mich.), who chairs the House Intelligence Committee, visited Beirut recently to interview CIA officers. Committee staff members want to determine whether CIA operatives used sloppy practices that revealed sensitive sources and methods.

Much in the case remains unclear, including the extent of the damage and whether negligence by CIA managers led to the loss of the Lebanese agents.

According to the source, CIA case officers met a series of Lebanese informants at a local Pizza Hut, allowing Hezbollah and Lebanese authorities to identify who was helping the CIA. U.S. officials strongly disputed that agents were compromised at a Pizza Hut.

U.S. officials also denied the source's allegation that the former CIA station chief dismissed an email warning that some of his Lebanese agents could be identified because they used cellphones to call only their CIA handlers and no one else.

Hezbollah, an Iranian-backed militant group that the U.S. considers a terrorist organization, and Lebanon's internal security service have used software to analyze cellphone calling and location records to help them identify a network of alleged Israeli spies since 2007, according to several people familiar with the case. Dozens of people were arrested.

In 2010, U.S. counterintelligence officials determined that the CIA's Lebanese agents could be traced the same way, the source said. But the station chief allegedly ignored the warning. "He said, 'The Lebanese are our friends. They wouldn't do that to us,' " the source said.

The Times is withholding the former station's chief's name because he remains undercover. He now has a supervisory role at CIA headquarters in operations targeting Hezbollah. The CIA declined to make him available for comment.

"Espionage has always been a complex business," said a U.S. official, who declined to be identified in discussing the Lebanon case. "Collecting sensitive information on adversaries — who are aggressively trying to uncover spies in their midst — will always be fraught with risk."

Hezbollah is "an extremely complicated enemy," the official added. "It's a determined terrorist group, a power political player, a mighty military and an accomplished intelligence organization — formidable and ruthless. No one underestimates its capabilities."

In June, Hezbollah's leader, Sheik Hassan Nasrallah, announced the arrest of three of its members. He said two were "affiliated with the CIA, and one more might be affiliated with either the CIA, European intelligence or Mossad," Israel's foreign intelligence service.

Nasrallah did not disclose their names, explaining that he wanted to protect their families, "whom I know personally." He said that CIA officers, working under diplomatic cover at the U.S. Embassy, had recruited them in early 2011.

The U.S. Embassy dismissed the charge. "These are the same kind of empty allegations that we have heard repeatedly from Hezbollah," it said in a statement.

Lebanon's security service was able to isolate the CIA informants by analyzing cellphone company records that showed the numbers called, duration of each call and location of the phone at the time of the call, the source said.

Using billing and cell tower records for hundreds of thousands of phone numbers, software can isolate cellphones used near an embassy, or used only once, or only on quick calls. The process quickly narrows down a small group of phones that a security service can monitor.

In 2005, an Italian prosecutor used cellphone calling and location records to help identify 26 Americans who he said took part in a 2003 abduction of a Muslim cleric on a street in Milan. A judge later convicted 23 Americans, including the CIA's former Milan base chief, in absentia for their role in the "extraordinary rendition" case.

Washington has given Lebanon's government more than $1 billion in various forms of aid since 2006 and has proposed an additional $236 million in aid this fiscal year.

The Obama administration has struggled with the relationship since 2008, when Hezbollah fighters seized control of parts of Beirut. That resulted in an Arab-brokered peace deal that gave Hezbollah a major role in Lebanon's government.

The group's political arm now has 16 of the 30 seats in the Cabinet of Lebanon's prime minister, Najib Mikati. Hezbollah is also active in Lebanon's security and intelligence services.
 
  • Advertisement
  • ecce homo

    ecce homo

    Well-Known Member
    AP Exclusive: Hezbollah unmasks US spies; CIA hurt in Lebanon, scrambles to protect `assets'

    WASHINGTON — The CIA’s operations in Lebanon have been badly damaged after Hezbollah identified and captured a number of U.S. spies recently, current and former U.S. officials told The Associated Press. The intelligence debacle is particularly troubling because the CIA saw it coming.

    Hezbollah’s longtime leader, Sheik Hassan Nasrallah, boasted on television in June that he had rooted out at least two CIA spies who had infiltrated the ranks of Hezbollah, which the U.S. considers a terrorist group closely allied with Iran. Though the U.S. Embassy in Lebanon officially denied the accusation, current and former officials concede that it happened and the damage has spread even further.

    In recent months, CIA officials have secretly been scrambling to protect their remaining spies — foreign assets or agents working for the agency — before Hezbollah can find them.

    To be sure, some deaths are to be expected in shadowy spy wars. It’s an extremely risky business and people get killed. But the damage to the agency’s spy network in Lebanon has been greater than usual, several former and current U.S. officials said, speaking on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly about security matters.

    The Lebanon crisis is the latest mishap involving CIA counterintelligence, the undermining or manipulating of the enemy’s ability to gather information. Former CIA officials have said that once-essential skill has been eroded as the agency shifted from outmaneuvering rival spy agencies to fighting terrorists. In the rush for immediate results, former officers say, tradecraft has suffered.

    The most recent high-profile example was the suicide bomber who posed as an informant and killed seven CIA employees and wounded six others in Khost, Afghanistan in December 2009.

    Last year, then-CIA director Leon Panetta said the agency had to maintain “a greater awareness of counterintelligence.” But eight months later, Nasrallah let the world know he had bested the CIA, demonstrating that the agency still struggles with this critical aspect of spying and sending a message to those who would betray Hezbollah.

    The CIA was well aware the spies were vulnerable in Lebanon. CIA officials were warned, including the chief of the unit that supervises Hezbollah operations from CIA headquarters in Langley, Va., and the head of counterintelligence. It remains unclear whether anyone has been or will be held accountable in the wake of this counterintelligence disaster or whether the incident will affect the CIA’s ability to recruit assets in Lebanon.

    In response to AP’s questions about what happened in Lebanon, a U.S. official said Hezbollah is recognized as a complicated enemy responsible for killing more Americans than any other terrorist group before September 2001. The agency does not underestimate the organization, the official said.

    The CIA’s toughest adversaries, like Hezbollah and Iran, have for years been improving their ability to hunt spies, relying on patience and guile to exploit counterintelligence holes.

    In 2007, for instance, when Ali-Reza Asgari, a brigadier general in the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps of Iran, disappeared in Turkey, it was assumed that he was either killed or defected. In response, the Iranian government began a painstaking review of foreign travel by its citizens, particularly to places like Turkey where Iranians don’t need a visa and could meet with foreign intelligence services.

    It didn’t take long, a Western intelligence official told the AP, before the U.S., Britain and Israel began losing contact with some of their Iranian spies.

    The State Department last year described Hezbollah as “the most technically capable terrorist group in the world,” and the Defense Department estimates it receives between $100 million and $200 million per year in funding from Iran.

    Backed by Iran, Hezbollah has built a professional counterintelligence apparatus that Nasrallah — whom the U.S. government designated an international terrorist a decade ago — proudly describes as the “spy combat unit.” U.S. intelligence officials believe the unit, which is considered formidable and ruthless, went operational in about 2004.

    Using the latest commercial software, Nasrallah’s spy-hunters unit began methodically searching for spies in Hezbollah’s midst. To find them, U.S. officials said, Hezbollah examined cellphone data looking for anomalies. The analysis identified cellphones that, for instance, were used rarely or always from specific locations and only for a short period of time. Then it came down to old-fashioned, shoe-leather detective work: Who in that area had information that might be worth selling to the enemy?

    The effort took years but eventually Hezbollah, and later the Lebanese government, began making arrests. By one estimate, 100 Israeli assets were apprehended as the news made headlines across the region in 2009. Some of those suspected Israeli spies worked for telecommunications companies and served in the military.

    Back at CIA headquarters, the arrests alarmed senior officials. The agency prepared a study on its own vulnerabilities, U.S. officials said, and the results proved to be prescient.

    The analysis concluded that the CIA was susceptible to the same analysis that had compromised the Israelis, the officials said.

    CIA managers were instructed to be extra careful about handling sources in Lebanon. A U.S. official said recommendations were issued to counter the potential problem.

    But it’s unclear what preventive measures were taken by the Hezbollah unit chief or the officer in charge of the Beirut station. Former officials say the Hezbollah unit chief is no stranger to the necessity of counterintelligence and knew the risks. The unit chief has worked overseas in hostile environments like Afghanistan and played an important role in the capture of a top terrorist while stationed in the Persian Gulf region after the attacks of 9/11.

    “We’ve lost a lot of people in Beirut over the years, so everyone should know the drill,” said a former Middle East case officer familiar with the situation.

    But whatever actions the CIA took, they were not enough. Like the Israelis, bad tradecraft doomed these CIA assets and the agency ultimately failed to protect them, an official said. In some instances, CIA officers fell into predictable patterns when meeting their sources, the official said.

    This allowed Hezbollah to identify assets and case officers and unravel at least part of the CIA’s spy network in Lebanon. There was also a reluctance to share cases and some files were put in “restricted handling.” The designation severely limits the number of people who know the identity of the source but also reduces the number of experts who could spot problems that might lead to their discovery, officials said.

    Nasrallah’s televised announcement in June was followed by finger-pointing among departments inside the CIA as the spy agency tried figure out what went wrong and contain the damage.

    The fate of these CIA assets is unknown. Hezbollah treats spies differently, said Matthew Levitt, a counterterrorism and intelligence expert at the Washington Institute for Near East Studies who’s writing a book about the terrorist organization

    “It all depends on who these guys were and what they have to say,” Levitt said. “Hezbollah has disappeared people before. Others they have kept around.”


    Who’s responsible for the mess in Lebanon? It’s not clear. The chief of Hezbollah operations at CIA headquarters continues to run the unit that also focuses on Iranians and Palestinians. The CIA’s top counterintelligence officer, who was one of the most senior women in the clandestine service, recently retired after approximately five years in the job. She is credited with some important cases, including the recent arrests of Russian spies who had been living in the U.S. for years.

    Officials said the woman was succeeded by a more experienced operations officer. That officer has held important posts in Moscow, Southeast Asia, Europe and the Balkans, important frontlines of the agency’s spy wars with foreign intelligence services and terrorist organizations.
     
    HannaTheCrusader

    HannaTheCrusader

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    why will they need a spy....

    few handlers are more than enough as there are 1000s of lebanese who will gladly and freely spy for them and for any other nation in fact
     
    NewB

    NewB

    Legendary Member
    why will they need a spy....

    few handlers are more than enough as there are 1000s of lebanese who will gladly and freely spy for them and for any other nation in fact
    lol they were recruited in early 2011 and were captured a few months after. So much for Lebanese spying :)
     
    ecce homo

    ecce homo

    Well-Known Member
    U.S. fears CIA spies caught, executed

    WASHINGTON, Nov. 21 (UPI) -- The United States fears many CIA operatives in Iran and Lebanon have been caught and executed, current and former U.S. officials said.

    The spies were paid informants recruited by the CIA for two espionage rings targeting Iran and Hezbollah, an organization in Lebanon on the U.S. terror list and backed by Iran, ABC News reported Monday.

    The CIA hasn't determined how many of its assets were compromised in Iran, but the number could be in the dozens, one current and one former U.S. intelligence official said. In Lebanon, officials said, Hezbollah picked up at least a dozen agents.

    "Espionage is a risky business," a U.S. official told ABC News while confirming the loss of the spies in the last six months. "Many risks lead to wins, but some result in occasional setbacks."

    Robert Baer, a former CIA officer who worked against Hezbollah in Beirut in the 1980s, said Hezbollah usually executes people caught or suspected of spying.

    "If they were genuine spies, spying against Hezbollah, I don't think we'll ever see them again," he told ABC News. "These guys are very, very vicious and unforgiving."

    Other current and former officials said the discovery of the two spy rings happened separately.

    "If you lose an asset, one source, that's normally a setback in espionage," Baer said. "But when you lose your entire station, either in Tehran or Beirut, that's a catastrophe; that just shouldn't be. And the only way that ever happens is when you're mishandling sources."

    One U.S. official offered reluctant respect to Iran's and Hezbollah's dogged efforts to detect and expose U.S. and Israeli espionage, ABC said. Others in the American intelligence community said sloppiness by the CIA also was to blame.
     
    HannaTheCrusader

    HannaTheCrusader

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    all the CIA leaks could be just a misinformation war and spread of lies..the world of spies is one of many many screens and smoke
     
    joe tayyar

    joe tayyar

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    U.S. fears CIA spies caught, executed

    WASHINGTON, Nov. 21 (UPI) -- The United States fears many CIA operatives in Iran and Lebanon have been caught and executed, current and former U.S. officials said.

    The spies were paid informants recruited by the CIA for two espionage rings targeting Iran and Hezbollah, an organization in Lebanon on the U.S. terror list and backed by Iran, ABC News reported Monday.

    The CIA hasn't determined how many of its assets were compromised in Iran, but the number could be in the dozens, one current and one former U.S. intelligence official said. In Lebanon, officials said, Hezbollah picked up at least a dozen agents.

    "Espionage is a risky business," a U.S. official told ABC News while confirming the loss of the spies in the last six months. "Many risks lead to wins, but some result in occasional setbacks."

    Robert Baer, a former CIA officer who worked against Hezbollah in Beirut in the 1980s, said Hezbollah usually executes people caught or suspected of spying.

    "If they were genuine spies, spying against Hezbollah, I don't think we'll ever see them again," he told ABC News. "These guys are very, very vicious and unforgiving."

    Other current and former officials said the discovery of the two spy rings happened separately.

    "If you lose an asset, one source, that's normally a setback in espionage," Baer said. "But when you lose your entire station, either in Tehran or Beirut, that's a catastrophe; that just shouldn't be. And the only way that ever happens is when you're mishandling sources."

    One U.S. official offered reluctant respect to Iran's and Hezbollah's dogged efforts to detect and expose U.S. and Israeli espionage, ABC said. Others in the American intelligence community said sloppiness by the CIA also was to blame.
    SHN spoke about this guy Robert baer in one of his speeches and his connection of the STL.
     
    ecce homo

    ecce homo

    Well-Known Member
    Pizza Party Gone Awry May Have Doomed CIA Spy Ring

    All the CIA’s Lebanon spies wanted was a slice. What they got, allegedly, was a big intelligence failure.

    Hezbollah may have just rolled up the CIA’s network of spies devoted to cracking the secrets of the Lebanese Shiite extremist group. If so, it’s because of one of the stupidest, least secure code words in history.

    According to ABC News, Hezbollah operatives figured out that CIA informants who had infiltrated the Iranian proxy group were meeting with their agency handlers at a Beirut Pizza Hut. How could Hezbollah deduce that location? “The CIA used the codeword ‘PIZZA’ when discussing where to meet with the agents,” ABC reports.

    The agency is reportedly fearful for the informants’ lives. “If they were genuine spies, spying against Hezbollah, I don’t think we’ll ever see them again,” retired CIA officer Robert Baer told ABC.

    An anonymous U.S. official denies to ABC that CIA’s Hezbollah network actually met in a Pizza Hut. We’ve reached out to the CIA and will update if they’re challenging the story further.

    If ABC is correct, though, it’s another spy-ring setback against Hezbollah and its Iranian sponsors, who appear devoted to gaining a nuclear weapon. In addition to losing the Lebanon informants, a different operation exposed “a secret internet communication method used by CIA-paid assets in Iran” to Iranian security officials. “Dozens” of assets may have been lost, according to ABC.

    It’s not like the CIA doesn’t have successes against Iran and its allies. It’s spent years disrupting Iran’s nuclear supply chain through sabotage. The Stuxnet worm that messed with Iran’s centrifuge control system may have been a joint U.S.-Israeli homebrew. Iranian nuclear scientists keep dying under mysterious circumstances. Some may have been kidnapped, as well.

    But the CIA also has an unfortunate streak of self-pwnage as well. New York Times national security reporter Jim Risen reported that in 2000, the CIA accidently exposed its entire network of Iranian contacts thanks to a boneheaded reply-all mishap.

    The successful targeting of Osama bin Laden gave the CIA its biggest success in decades. But that may mask some deeper problems, according to one of ABC’s anonymous sources: “Officers take short cuts and no one is held accountable.” But now CIA sloppiness even comes with free Crazy Bread.
     
    Resistancefrom89

    Resistancefrom89

    Well-Known Member
    all the CIA leaks could be just a misinformation war and spread of lies..the world of spies is one of many many screens and smoke
    Fully agree, could not have said it better.

    What would people expect the CIA to say: we have today x number of operative in Lebanon, and y number inside Hezbollah and z number in the Lebanese army?
     
    neutral

    neutral

    Legendary Member
    Could this have anything to do with the disappearance of Joseph Sader? :502:
     
    baleha

    baleha

    Well-Known Member
    Could this have anything to do with the disappearance of Joseph Sader? :502:
    In Lebanon, when no one knows how someone has disappeared, it means everybody knows how he disappeared and who is behind it.
     
    joe tayyar

    joe tayyar

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    الاستخبارات الأميركية تهرب من بيروت​


    انفجار عين المريسة | في 18 نيسان 1983 تعرّضت السفارة الأميركية في بيروت بمنطقة عين المريسة لهجوم انتحاري أدى إلى سقوط 63 قتيلاً أميركياً و100 جريح. اللافت أنّ من بين القتلى ثمانية ضباط من وكالة الاستخبارات الأميركية التي كانت تعقد اجتماعاً على مستوى قيادة الشرق الأوسط. وأهم هؤلاء الضباط بوب أيمز، مستشار وزير الخارجية الأميركية حينها، جورج شولتز، وهو أحد أبرز خبراء سي أي إيه في المنطقة.



    آخر فصول الحرب السريّة الدائرة بين الاستخبارات الأميركية وجهاز أمن المقاومة كشفته الصحافة الأميركية أمس، وإن بشكل جزئي. شبه اعتراف رسمي أميركي باختراق أمني كبير حقّقه حزب الله وسوريا وإيران أدى إلى إغلاق «محطة» بيروت التابعة لـ «سي آي إي» بعد كشف عدد من مخبريها
    ابراهيم الأمين

    إثر إعلان الأمين العام لحزب الله، السيد حسن نصر الله، في حزيران الماضي، اكتشاف جهاز أمن المقاومة عملاء لإسرائيل وللاستخبارات الأميركية في صفوفه، بادرت السفارة الأميركية في بيروت إلى نفي الأمر، ووضعه في خانة الادعاءات، وهو الأمر الذي واكبته قيادات من فريق 14 آذار بالقول إن حزب الله يحاول أن يرمي بالمسؤولية على الجانب الأميركي. وأبلغ أكثر من مسؤول من هذا الفريق، أو من قوى أمنية رسمية، سائليهم، بأن «ادعاء حزب الله» لا أساس له من الصحة.

    طبعاً، لم يكن أحد ينتظر الجانب الأميركي ليعلن أي موقف تفصيلي غير النفي الرسمي الذي صدر عن السفارة في بيروت، باعتبار أن السيد نصر الله أشار إلى أن الذين عملوا على تجنيد عناصر من الحزب هم من موظفي السفارة. لكن حقيقة الأمر، كما يرويها إعلاميون أميركيون، أنه لا أحد في الولايات المتحدة تعامل مع الأمر بجدية؛ فهم من جهة عدّوا كلام نصر الله نوعاً من الاتهامات التقليدية، وفهموا من مراجعات لبعضهم مع مسؤولين أميركيين، وخصوصاً من جهات الاستخبارات، أن ليس هناك من يدعو إلى متابعة كلام نصر الله.
    لكن الذي كان يجري في هذه الاثناء تجاوز كل ما نشر، بما في ذلك ما نشر في الصحافة الأميركية أمس، وفيه «ما يشبه الاعتراف الرسمي» بوجود هذه الحقيقة؛ إذ تبين أن الاستخبارات الأميركية تواجه أزمة كبيرة منذ الربيع الماضي، عندما تبيّن لها أن بعض من جُنِّدوا لمصلحتها قد أُوقع بهم، ليس في لبنان فقط، بل في سوريا وفي إيران. ومع أن نظام العمل لا يربط بين هذه المجموعة أو تلك، إلا أن الغاية المعلوماتية والتنفيذية لعمل هذه المجموعات متصل بعضها ببعض، وتنطلق من عمل مشترك مع أجهزة الاستخبارات الإسرائيلية في مواجهة «عمليات التسلح المتعاظمة لقوى المقاومة في لبنان وفلسطين، ودور إيران وسوريا في هذه العملية»، على ما قال مصدر متابع لـ«الأخبار»، أوضح أن ردود الفعل التي صدرت أمس على ما نشر في الصحافة الأميركية أظهرت أن الأمر ربما تجاوز ما كُشف عنه.
    وبحسب مصادر متابعة، فإن الشغل الأساسي للاستخبارات الأميركية استهدف في تلك الفترة الآتي:
    ــــ المباشرة بإجراءات حماية مكثّفة لكل من جُنِّد في العمل الأمني، إما من خلال تهريبه إلى خارج لبنان وسوريا وإيران، أو من خلال اتخاذ احتياطات إضافية لمنع انكشافه.
    ــــ المباشرة بإعفاء ضباط من الاستخبارات الأميركية من العاملين في هذه القضية من مهماتهم، وسحبهم إلى الولايات المتحدة أو نقلهم إلى ساحات أكثر أمناً.
    ــــ تأليف خلية تحقيق هدفها التدقيق في الأسباب المحتملة وراء الخرق الذي أتاح لجهاز أمن المقاومة في لبنان، وللاستخبارات السورية والإيرانية، كشف هذه المجموعات. وتركز عمل هذه الخلية على درس ملف الاتصالات الهاتفية والإلكترونية للعملاء وللضباط الذين يتواصلون معهم، إضافة إلى كل ملف التواصل المباشر لناحية الأمكنة والسيارات والأشخاص الذين يعرفون بالأمر.
    ــــ العمل على مراجعة المواد التي حصلوا عليها من خلال هذه الشبكات ومحاولة التثبت منها أو السعي إلى التدقيق في ما إذا كان هناك عملاء مزدوجون قد عملوا في هذه القضية، وسعياً إلى تحديد زمن حصول الانكشاف لتحديد المعلومات الحقيقية من تلك التي يمكن أن تكون قد وصلت إلى الاستخبارات الأميركية على سبيل التضليل.
    وفي تموز الماضي، نشرت «الأخبار» تقريراً عن الحرب الأمنية الدائرة بين الاستخبارات الأميركية والإسرائيلية وبين أجهزة الأمن في لبنان وسوريا وإيران. يومها، «كشف النقاب عنه في طهران ودمشق وبيروت بين شهري نيسان وأيار الماضيين. البداية كانت في سوريا، حيث كشفت خلية من 25 شخصاً عملاء لحلف الأطلسي، اعتُقل 17 منهم، فيما فر واحد إلى دبي وثلاثة إلى لبنان عادوا والتحقوا به، بعد تهريبهم إلى الإمارات بواسطة طرف لبناني. وأعلنت وزارة الأمن الإيرانية، في 20 أيار الماضي، اعتقال شبكة تجسس إيرانية لمصلحة وكالة الاستخبارات المركزية الأميركية تضم 30 إيرانياً، وذلك بعد إجراءات أمنية واسعة النطاق قام بها رجال الأمن داخل إيران وأخرى بالتعاون مع الجهات المعنية في سوريا ولبنان، حيث كُشف عن 42 من الضباط الأمنيين التابعين لوكالة الاستخبارات في دول مختلفة».
    ومع هرب الملاحقين السوريين الثلاثة إلى لبنان، طلبت الاستخبارات السورية من نظيرتها اللبنانية، وتلك الخاصة بحزب الله، المساعدة في اعتقالهم. وتضيف أن طلباً كهذا استنفر أجهزة مكافحة التجسس في لبنان. وربما كان هذا الاستنفار قد أدى دوراً في القبض على شبكة العملاء التي أعلنها حزب الله. وتؤكد هذه المصادر أن «هذه العمليات كشفت عن انتقال مركز العمل الرئيسي للأميركيين في المنطقة من السعودية ولبنان إلى دولة الإمارات العربية المتحدة، وإلى مدينة دبي على وجه التحديد، ربطاً بمزايا هذه الإمارة الخاصة لجهة الدخول والخروج منها ونوعية الأعمال التي يمكن القيام بها كغطاء للعمل الأمني».

    ??????????? ????????? ???? ?? ????? | ???????
     
    NewB

    NewB

    Legendary Member
    Something doesn't make sense. Why would the CIA leak that their station in Lebanon has been compromised ? The Israelis lost several Lebanese assets but they didn't say anything and kept it quite for a reason.

    They gave up the small fish to cover the escape of the big fish.
     
    J. Abizeid

    J. Abizeid

    Well-Known Member
    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/23/world/middleeast/hezbollah-says-it-has-unmasked-spies-for-cia-in-lebanon.html

    November 22, 2011

    Hezbollah Says It Has Unmasked Spies for C.I.A. in Lebanon

    By NADA BAKRI

    BEIRUT, Lebanon — Hezbollah, the Lebanese Shiite militant group, has identified and captured several people it accuses of being informants and spies for the Central Intelligence Agency, according to a Lebanese security official and news agency reports quoting Hezbollah officials and current and former American officials.
    The Lebanese security official, who is close to Hezbollah but spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss the matter publicly, said that the group captured the accused spies, all thought to be Lebanese, earlier this year. Hezbollah believes that at least some of them were recruited by the United States Embassy in Beirut, he said.
    “It is not clear how many they are and how they were all recruited and from where,” the official said. “No one also knows anything about their fate.”
    On Tuesday, a Hezbollah lawmaker, Hassan Fadlallah, told the Lebanese television station Al Jadeed, which is close to the group, that his organization had succeeded in unmasking several spies working with the C.I.A., without giving further details.
    The leader of Hezbollah, Hassan Nasrallah, claimed in a televised address in June that his organization had caught at least two people working for the C.I.A. in Lebanon after they infiltrated Hezbollah’s ranks. The American Embassy officially denied that claim at the time. But in an article on Monday, The Associated Press quoted current and former American officials, speaking on condition of anonymity, as saying that Mr. Nasrallah’s claim was accurate and that those captures led the group to other informants.
    The State Department has described Hezbollah as “the most technically capable terrorist organization in the world,” and the Pentagon estimates that the group receives $100 million to $200 million a year in aid from Iran. Hezbollah is Syria’s most powerful ally in Lebanon, and it has emerged as the kingmaker in Lebanese politics.
     
    kappa273

    kappa273

    Well-Known Member
    this is leak rather than a newspaper story...

    i wonder why!

    several newspapers report at the same time on some event which happened several months ago and which was generally unnoticed...

    kappa
     
    Hameed

    Hameed

    Well-Known Member
    this is leak rather than a newspaper story...

    i wonder why!

    several newspapers report at the same time on some event which happened several months ago and which was generally unnoticed...

    kappa
    It seems Like Leon Panetta felt he's being trashed by McCain and that he should deliver a blow back.
    The dangerous thing however, is how the CIA is boldly saying: " stopping our work in Lebanon is BuLLLshit !! "
    Its operations radius has been dramatically reduced but for them to say the above sentence means that they are certain, that some of their Lebanese agents are of a certain status and political weight, they can't be brought to Justice in front of Lebanese tribunals.

    Surely that's a lot !! Any thoughts about the SIYEDEH 7ORIYEH WOU ESTE2LEL ?


    Al Akhbar Newspaper PDFs:
    CIA Flees Lebanon - part1
    CIA Flees Lebanon - part2
     
    Dirty Dragon

    Dirty Dragon

    Well-Known Member
    Something doesn't make sense. Why would the CIA leak that their station in Lebanon has been compromised ? The Israelis lost several Lebanese assets but they didn't say anything and kept it quite for a reason.

    They gave up the small fish to cover the escape of the big fish.
    Nasrallah in his June address sarcastically pointed at how American "diplomats", unlike Mossad officers, walk around with diplomatic immunity to recruit and do as they want. It was a subtle hint that this situation is not normal and should be changed.

    If I had to guess I'd say the Americans are being nice and even overly generous in their statements so as to avoid additional scrutiny being directed at the embassy and it's diplomatic/espionage operations.

    PS: The take over of the American embassy in Iran unraveled their whole network at the time. I'm sure they have better paper shredding capability now but regardless it is a good idea for them to keep the heat away from their embassy.
     
    J. Abizeid

    J. Abizeid

    Well-Known Member
    Lebanon to summon US envoy over 'CIA operatives'

    AFP: Lebanon to summon US envoy over 'CIA operatives'

    BEIRUT — Lebanon's Hezbollah-dominated government on Wednesday announced it would summon the US ambassador to Beirut after the powerful Shiite group said it had succeeded in exposing CIA operatives.
    "The cabinet has decided to summon US Ambassador Maura Connelly to question her on this issue," said Agriculture Minister Hussein Hajj Hassan, who represents the Iran-backed Hezbollah in the 30-seat government.
    "This is not the first aggression of its kind on Lebanon... and cannot be divided from Israeli (spies)," Hajj Hassan told reporters during a break from a cabinet meeting.
    The statement comes hours after the militant group said it succeeded in uncovering Central Intelligence Agency operatives who had infiltrated Hezbollah and urged the government to take immediate measures against the US embassy.
    "Lebanese intelligence vanquished US and Israeli intelligence in what is now known as the intelligence war," said Hezbollah MP Hassan Fadlallah, who heads parliament's telecommunications committee.
    "Our security... has exposed several American and Israeli plots on Lebanon," Fadlallah told reporters outside parliament.
    "We call on the Lebanese government to take immediate action... and raise the issue with the United Nations and embassies, so that the whole world is aware of what the US embassy in Lebanon is doing."
    Wednesday's comments follow reports earlier this week which said Hezbollah had uncovered several operatives within the movement working for the CIA.
    In the first acknowledgement of infiltration since the group's founding in the 1980s, Hezbollah chief Hassan Nasrallah in June had said members of his group confessed to being CIA agents.
    Nasrallah accused his arch-foe Israel of turning to the US spy agency after failing to infiltrate his party, slamming the American embassy in Beirut as a "den of spies."
    The US embassy in Beirut dismissed the accusations as "empty."
    More than 100 people in Lebanon have been arrested on suspicion of spying for Israel since April 2009, including military personnel and telecoms employees.
    Lebanon and Israel technically remain in a state of war, and convicted spies face life imprisonment or the death sentence if found guilty of contributing to Lebanese loss of life.
    Lebanon has protested to the United Nations over the alleged Israeli spy networks.
     
    ecce homo

    ecce homo

    Well-Known Member
    كتلة "المستقبل"

    نستغرب كشف شبكات ال
    في لبنان CIA

    tayyar.org​
     
    Top