Islamic sects and their differences

Aoune32!

Aoune32!

Well-Known Member
Lets open a thread about the different islamic sects, beliefs and where they are located?

Sunni
Shia
Druze
Alawite
 
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  • Ice Tea

    Ice Tea

    Member
    Leich ba2a??? They dont have mosques or believe in Mohammad?
    I think they both accept Mohammed as a prophet, but not as THE prophet, they have their own other prophets that are more important. Both of them believe in rencarnation. And they don't follow the 5 pillars of Islam, they don't pilgrimage to Mecca etc. They also have their own scriptures. They don't have mosques, Druze go to 'Khalwis' tho which is more of social/community meeting than a religious one, and Alawites usually pray at home.

    They both share a lot with Christianity:

    Alawites celebrate Christmas, Epiphany, they have their own Trinity and Mass where they consume wine, women don't wear headscarf etc they pray to Saint John and Mary Magdalene and other biblical figures..

    Druze user Mysobalanus explained here about the Druze and why they are not Muslims:

    Deep into Druze faith
     
    Last edited:
    Mysobalanus

    Mysobalanus

    New Member
    Leich ba2a??? They dont have mosques or believe in Mohammad?
    Alewites believe in Mohammad but he's under Ali. (Ain Meem Seen - Ali (God) Mohammad (Communicator) Salman (Door to the Faith ). Druze reject Mohammad completely and even call him "Iblees".

    They both don't really have mosques. Both build some temples looking like mosques (sometimes) but they don't use them for religious practices. Just for temple visits of commoners to make Nidrs. The mosque-look is probably for Taqiyah as well. Initiated Druze meet weekly in a Majlees (usually a room in a modest looking house or structure). Alewites also use rooms and sometimes go the woods to perform their main ritual. They basically drink wine surrounded by candles and have something similar to a Christian mass. The wine and light represents Ali and is used as a form of spiritual alleviation.
     
    Mysobalanus

    Mysobalanus

    New Member
    I think they both accept Mohammed as a prophet, but not as THE prophet, they have their own other prophets that are more important. Both of them believe in rencarnation. And they don't follow the 5 pillars of Islam, they don't pilgrimage to Mecca etc. They also have their own scriptures. They don't have mosques, Druze go to 'Khalwis' tho which is more of social/community meeting than a religious one, and Alawites usually pray at home.
    Druze reject Mohammad whereas Alewites put Ali before him. Druze believe in reincarnation while Alewites believe in transmigration (so also humans to animals as well). The Druze use the Hikma as a scripture while the Alewites rely on something called "Al-Mshyakhah" which is a guideline to monks. And they have their founder Ibn Nusair's letters. Both have Vedas-like appearances of God and something close to a Hare Krishna model of theology.
     
    Mysobalanus

    Mysobalanus

    New Member
    Druze and Alewites are certainly influenced by Islam and their founders came from Islamic cultures and backgrounds. But the faith itself is too separate that's it is fair to consider them their own religions. It doesn't make sense to call Druze "Islamic" when the Mithaaq of Initiation tells you to "deny all religions and faiths".
     
    Muki

    Muki

    Well-Known Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Druze and Alewites are certainly influenced by Islam and their founders came from Islamic cultures and backgrounds. But the faith itself is too separate that's it is fair to consider them their own religions. It doesn't make sense to call Druze "Islamic" when the Mithaaq of Initiation tells you to "deny all religions and faiths".
    Are they off-shoots or simply communities who protected themselves by adopting Islamic beliefs/customs in order to blend in?
     
    Aoune32!

    Aoune32!

    Well-Known Member
    Sunnis
    The great majority of the world's more than 1.5 billion Muslims are Sunnis - estimates suggest the figure is somewhere between 85% and 90%. In the Middle East, Sunnis make up 90% or more of the populations of Egypt, Jordan and Saudi Arabia.

    Sunnis regard themselves as the orthodox branch of Islam.

    The name "Sunni" is derived from the phrase "Ahl al-Sunnah", or "People of the Tradition". The tradition in this case refers to practices based on what the Prophet Muhammad said, did, agreed to or condemned.


    All Muslims are guided by the Sunnah, but Sunnis stress its primacy. Shia are also guided by the wisdom of Muhammad's descendants through his son-in-law and cousin, Ali.

    Sunni life is guided by four schools of legal thought, each of which strives to develop practical applications of the Sunnah.
     
    Aoune32!

    Aoune32!

    Well-Known Member
    Shia
    Shia constitute about 10% of all Muslims, and globally their population is estimated at between 154 and 200 million.
    Shia Muslims are in the majority in Iran, Iraq, Bahrain, Azerbaijan and, according to some estimates, Yemen. There are also large Shia communities in Afghanistan, India, Kuwait, Lebanon, Pakistan, Qatar, Syria, Turkey, Saudi Arabia and the UAE.

    In early Islamic history, the Shia were a movement - literally "Shiat Ali" or the "Party of Ali". They claimed that Ali was the rightful successor to the Prophet Muhammad as leader (imam) of the Muslim community following his death in 632.

    Ali was assassinated in 661 after a five-year caliphate that was marred by civil war. His sons, Hassan and Hussein, were denied what they thought was their legitimate right of accession to the caliphate.

    Hassan is believed to have been poisoned in 680 by Muawiyah, the first caliph of the Sunni Umayyad dynasty, while Hussein was killed on the battlefield by the Umayyads in 681. These events gave rise to the Shia concept of martyrdom and the rituals of grieving.

    There are three main branches of Shia Islam today - the Zaidis, Ismailis and Ithna Asharis (Twelvers or Imamis). The Ithna Asharis are the largest group and believe that Muhammad's religious leadership, spiritual authority and divine guidance were passed on to 12 of his descendants, beginning with Ali, Hassan and Hussein.

    The 12th Imam, Muhammad al-Mahdi, is said to have disappeared from a cave below a mosque in 878. Ithna Asharis believe the so-called "awaited imam" did not die and will return at the end of time to restore justice on earth.
     
    Aoune32!

    Aoune32!

    Well-Known Member
    Druze
    Some believe that the Druze faith is a monotheistic Abrahamic religion that follows the Five Pillars of Islam. However, other sources claim that the Druze faith does not follow the Five Pillars of Islam, such as fasting during the month of Ramadan, or believing in the prophet Muhammad, and making a pilgrimage to Mecca. The Druze beliefs incorporate elements of Ismailism, Gnosticism, Neoplatonism and other philosophies. The Druze call themselves Ahl al-Tawhid "People of Unitarianism or Monotheism" or "al-Muwaḥḥidūn."

    The Druze follow a life-style of isolation where no conversion is allowed, neither out of, or into, the religion. When Druze live among people of other religions, they try to blend in, in order to protect their religion and their own safety. They can pray as Muslims, or as Christians, depending on where they are. This system is apparently changing in modern times, where more security has allowed Druze to be more open about their religious belonging.

    Although dwarfed by other, larger communities, the Druze community played an important role in shaping the history of the Levant, where it continues to play a large political role. As a religious minority in every country, they have frequently experienced persecution, except in Lebanon and Israel, where Druze judges, parliamentarians, diplomats, and doctors occupy the highest echelons of society. Even though the faith originally developed out of Ismaili Islam, Druze are not considered Muslims, although Al Azhar of Egypt recognizes them as one of the Islamic sects akin to Shia. Fatimid caliph Ali az-Zahir, whose father al-Hakim is a key figure in the Druze faith, was particularly harsh, causing the death of many Druze in Antioch, Aleppo, and northern Syria. Persecution flared up during the rule of the Mamluks and Ottomans. Most recently, Druze were targeted by the ISIL and Al-Qaeda in order to cleanse Syria and neighboring countries of non-Islamic influence.
     
    Aoune32!

    Aoune32!

    Well-Known Member
    Alawites
    The Alawis, also rendered as Alawites, are a sect of Ghulat branch of shia islam. primarily centred in Syria. The eponymously-named Alawites revere Ali (Ali ibn Abi Talib), considered the first imam of the Twelver school. However, they are generally considered to be ghulat by Shia Islam. The group is believed to have been founded by Ibn Nusayr during the 9th century and fully established as a religion. For this reason, Alawites are sometimes called Nusayris (Arabic: نصيرية‎ Nuṣayrīyyah), though the term has come to be used as a pejorative in the modern era.

    Alawites identify as a separate ethnoreligious group. The Quran is only one of their holy books and texts, and their interpretation thereof has very little in common with the Muslim interpretation but in accodance with the early Batinniyah and other Muslim ghulats sects. Alawite theology and rituals break from mainstream Islam in several remarkable ways. For one the Alawites drink wine as Ali's transubstantiated essence in their rituals; while other Muslims abstain from alcohol, Alawites are encouraged to drink socially in moderation. Finally, they also believe in reincarantion. Alawites have historically kept their beliefs secret from outsiders and non-initiated Alawites, so rumours about them have arisen. Arabic accounts of their beliefs tend to be partisan (either positively or negatively). However, since the early 2000s, Western scholarship on the Alawite religion has made significant advances. At the core of Alawite belief is a divine triad, comprising three aspects of the one God. These aspects, or emanations, appear cyclically in human form throughout history.

    Alawis are self-described as a community of "true believers". Alawites "celebrate Mass, including consecration of bread and wine."

    Alawite doctrine incorporates Islamic, Gnostic, neo-Platonic, Christian and other elements and has, therefore, been described as syncretic.

    According to an article appeared on The Telegraph, the 1995 edition of The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Modern Islamic World allegedly describes them as "extremist" Shi’ia whose "religious system separates them from Sunni Muslims," but also states that they "celebrate Mass, including consecration of bread and wine."

    Reincarnation
    Alawites hold that they were originally stars or divine lights that were cast out of heaven through disobedience and must undergo repeated reincarnation (or metempsychosis) before returning to heaven. They can be reincarnated as Christians or others through sin and as animals if they become infidels. In addition, they believe that God might have incarnated twice; the first incarnation was Joshua who conquered Canaan, and the second was the fourth Caliph,
     
    Aoune32!

    Aoune32!

    Well-Known Member
    One can say that Alawites and Druze are not muslims. They are minority ethnic groups like the Yazidis, Shabaks, etc.
     
    Aoune32!

    Aoune32!

    Well-Known Member
    Ismāʿīlism are a branch of Shia Islam. The Ismāʿīlī get their name from their acceptance of Imam Ismail Ibn Jafar as the appointed spiritual successor (Imam) to Jafar al-Sadiq, wherein they differ from the Twelvers who accept Musa-al-Kadhim, younger brother of Isma'il, as the true Imam.

    Ismailism rose at one point to become the largest branch of Shī‘ism, climaxing as a political power with the Fatimid Caliphate in the tenth through twelfth centuries. Ismailis believe in the oneness of god, as well as the closing of divine revelation with Muhammad, whom they see as "the final Prophet and Messenger of God to all humanity". The Ismāʿīlī and the Twelvers both accept the same initial Imams.

    After being set free by Yazid, Zaynab bint ALi, the daughter of Fatimah and ALi and the sister of Hasan and Husayn, started to spread the word of Karbala to the Muslim world, making speeches regarding the event. This was the first organized da'wah of the Shia, which would later develop into an extremely spiritual institution for the Ismāʿīlīs.

    After the poisoning of ALi Ibn Husayn Zayn al-Abidin by Hisham ibn Abd al-Malik in 713, Shiism's first succession crisis arose with Zayd ibn Alis companions and the Zaydiswho claimed Zayd ibn ‘Alī as the Imām, whilst the rest of the Shia upheld Muhammad al bakir as the Imām. The Zaidis argued that any sayyid or "descendant of Muhammad through Hasan or Husayn" who rebelled against tyranny and the injustice of his age could be the Imām. The Zaidis created the first Shi'i states in Iran, Iraq and Yemen.

    In contrast to his predecessors, Muhammad al-Baqir focused on academic Islamic scholarship in Medina, where he promulgated his teachings to many Muslims, both Shia and non-Shia, in an extremely organized form of Daʿwah. In fact, the earliest text of the Ismaili school of thought is said to be the Umm al kitab (The Archetypal Book), a conversation between Muhammad al-Baqir and three of his disciples.

    This tradition would pass on to his son, Ja'far al-Sadiq, who inherited the Imāmate on his father's death in 743. Ja'far al-Sadiq excelled in the scholarship of the day and had many pupils, including three of the four founders of the Sunni madhhabs.

    However, following al-Sadiq's poisoning in 765, a fundamental split occurred in the community. Ismael Ibn Jafar, who at one point was appointed by his father as the next Imam, appeared to have predeceased his father in 755. While Twelvers argue that either he was never heir apparent or he truly predeceased his father and hence Musa al Khadim was the true heir to the Imamate, the Ismāʿīlīs argue that either the death of Isma'il was staged in order to protect him from Abbasid persecution or that the Imamate passed to Muhammad ibn Isma'il in lineal descent.
     
    Aoune32!

    Aoune32!

    Well-Known Member
    One thing for sure muslims have in common is killing. If you read about them all over the son killed his father, cousin killed his cousin, brother killed brother, etc. All their lives are about killing. There is not one good thing in their religion and that is why we don't believe in it.
     
    Mysobalanus

    Mysobalanus

    New Member
    Are they off-shoots or simply communities who protected themselves by adopting Islamic beliefs/customs in order to blend in?
    Idk. It seems more like like the latter due to some very common degrees among secret societies and ancient Hindu beliefs.
     
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