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Ksa/uae/bahrain/egypt cut ties with qatar [blockade lifted soon?]

O Brother

Legendary Member
Here's an idea -- start doing it and stop blaming others for your own failures. Why are Muslims the most incompetent people on the face of the planet, who despite the petrodollar wealth they have yet to contribute anything meaningful to the progress of humanity in the modern era?

Israel is a capable and fully independent Jewish nation, and despite several wars of aggression meant to eradicate her and throw her people in the sea, she persisted and triumphed.


Israel is not fully independent country in that sense actually they can not but rely on the western world as much as you want to deny this but this is the truth..
Simply Israel wouldn't have lasted a day without the west..

Muslim nations and Arab nations in particular are in such huge failure state today is because of that petrodollar in particular.. the only way forward is for total collapse of all these regimes ruled by power hungry tyrants and the reemerging of the true law in these nation..

Just yesterday all these nations including African nations were colonized so they need much more time to get out from this mess..

I know enough to tell you that the end of these wars was also the end of the Church, Christianity and the Divine Rights of Kings Doctrine. Oh and yes out of the 30 years war Sweden came out of it as Lutheran secular state detached from the Church. The Church and Christianity did not reemerge over some Catholic subjects of faith. You think Islam would survive the atrocities it is demonstrating which is not evidenced in the results of the wars you mentioned.

True these wars ended the church but just because these war did.. it doesn't mean the same outcome will happen to Islam...

the outcome of this is still unknown and only God knows how it will all go the possibility for that scenario is there for sure but it is not a certainty to when this will happen..

Now you wish for this to happen I simply don't!

Do not get excited, akh NoB enjoys talking the talk, from afar, like many western embedded alf laila wa hajma arabien nights dreamers.
Tweets, youtube channels, Facebook videos salted with few occasional live chats with likeminded in a smooth blending, makes the tales of a caliphate stretching from the mou7eet 2ila al khaleej the more romantic.

NoB is a harmless jihadi dreamer, bass he keeps it men b3eed la b3eed, he'd preach to you about the virtue of living under sharia all day long. Ask him to leave his scandinavian asylum and join a country where sharia is already applied, say saudi wahabia, he'd tell you "3am tshatté, allah byeb3at... wa soubhanullah". :smuggrin:


It is crazy that after all these chats between you and me you haven't concluded out that I'm actually against AbdulWahhabism.. and very much against Saudi arabia but hey whatever entertains you man!
 

My Moria Moon

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
It is crazy that after all these chats between you and me you haven't concluded out that I'm actually against AbdulWahhabism.. and very much against Saudi arabia but hey whatever entertains you man!

bisharafak NoB, if another regime offered you sharia in any other place than where you now are living, would you leave to live there? I say no, you're too smart to live in any sharia ruled country, irrespective of who rules it. Am I right or spot on? Bisharafak w wi7yet allah now? Give me for once a straight answer so I can go out and do something more useful with my evening.:)
 

Mighty Goat

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
bisharafak NoB, if another regime offered you sharia in any other place than where you now are living, would you leave to live there? I say no, you're too smart to live in any sharia ruled country, irrespective of who rules it. Am I right or spot on? Bisharafak w wi7yet allah now? Give me for once a straight answer so I can go out and do something more useful with my evening.:)

He is fixated at this chapter from the history book from the Abbaside Dynasty, which was not governed by Shari'a law anyhow since there was no Shari'a yet.
 

proIsrael-nonIsraeli

Legendary Member
To make it short: Simply by being capable and being fully independent as a nation in its true meaning.. unlike the current situation of the Muslim world

"being capable and being fully independent as a nation" -

First of all, nobody is fully independent, not even USA.
Second, other than that many counties are "capable and independent", so your goal is not insurmountable if you are willing to change.
 

proIsrael-nonIsraeli

Legendary Member
Muslim nations is an illusion in your head. There are no Muslim nations. Thanks to ISIS and Hezbollah that we see the death of Islam. Nothing called Islam will reemerge again. The most recent memory is so repulsive it does not make people want to be part of Islamic barbarism. These are facts.

It's not death of Islam, we see pre-Renaissance condition in Islam similar to Western Christianity state 600 years ago during Inquisition times.
 

O Brother

Legendary Member
bisharafak NoB, if another regime offered you sharia in any other place than where you now are living, would you leave to live there? I say no, you're too smart to live in any sharia ruled country, irrespective of who rules it. Am I right or spot on? Bisharafak w wi7yet allah now? Give me for once a straight answer so I can go out and do something more useful with my evening.:)

Yes and I would run to that place but such place do not exist (sadly) and most probably wont exist in my life time..


He is fixated at this chapter from the history book from the Abbaside Dynasty, which was not governed by Shari'a law anyhow since there was no Shari'a yet.

The Abbaside rule had it downs and ups.. its good and bad after all the fourth Fitna was during the Abbasid rule..
I'm not that fixated on the Abbasid rule but yes I like reading about it in the same way I'm interested about the Fatimid and admire them for many things and this is true to the rest..

And there is nothing wrong with admiring history and relate to a specific time in history..

I for example enjoy Swedish history and how close Sweden once was to bring down Moscow but the Battle of Poltava was pretty much a decisive factor. I guess bad luck didn't allow it to happen it must be fate..


Now back to the Abbasids whether they were governing by Shariah or not how is that a big deal or related`? am I asking for the return of an Abbasids Caliphate or something? This is not the first time you say that in our debates..

[article]Following a period of revolts and civil war, the Umayyads were overthrown in 750 and replaced by the Abbasid dynasty. During the 500-year rule of the Abbasids, the Sharia reached its full development.

Under their absolute rule, the Abbasids transferred substantial areas of criminal law from the kadis to the government. The kadis continued to handle cases involving religious, family, property, and commercial law.

The Abbasids encouraged legal scholars to debate the Sharia vigorously. One group held that only the divinely inspired Koran and teachings of the Prophet Muhammad should make up the Sharia. A rival group, however, argued that the Sharia should also include the reasoned opinions of qualified legal scholars. Different legal systems began to develop in different provinces.

In an attempt to reconcile the rival groups, a brilliant legal scholar named Shafii systematized and developed what were called the "roots of the law." Shafii argued that in solving a legal question, the kadior government judge should first consult the Koran. If the answer were not clear there, the judge should refer to the authentic sayings and decisions of Muhammad. If the answer continued to elude the judge, he should then look to the consensus of Muslim legal scholars on the matter. Still failing to find a solution, the judge could form his own answer by analogy from "the precedent nearest in resemblance and most appropriate" to the case at hand.

Shafii provoked controversy. He constantly criticized what he called "people of reason" and "people of tradition." While speaking in Egypt in 820, he was physically attacked by enraged opponents and died a few days later. Nevertheless, Shafii's approach was later widely adopted throughout the Islamic world.

By around the year 900, the classic Sharia had taken shape. Islamic specialists in the law assembled handbooks for judges to use in making their decisions.

The classic Sharia was not a code of laws, but a body of religious and legal scholarship that continued to develop for the next 1,000 years.[/article]



"being capable and being fully independent as a nation" -

First of all, nobody is fully independent, not even USA.
Second, other than that many counties are "capable and independent", so your goal is not insurmountable if you are willing to change.

When nations are truly independent and capable of securing their nations and their citizens then these nations are capable of achieving greatness this is a formula which is true to any nation..
 

My Moria Moon

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
Yes and I would run to that place but such place do not exist (sadly) and most probably wont exist in my life time..

Good answer to say a definitive "no" while keeping the illusion barely alive, just in case some "allah" spies are watching or eavesdropping.
 

Venom

Legendary Member
Saudi Arabia 'top of the list' in funding extremism in Britain

Theresa May meets Saudi Arabia's King Salman bin Abdulaziz al Saud in April
By Alan McGuinness, Political Reporter

Saudi Arabia is "undoubtedly at the top of the list" when it comes to funding Islamist extremism in Britain, it has been claimed.

The Henry Jackson Society said a clear and growing link can be drawn between overseas money, which mainly comes from Saudi Arabia, and the recent wave of attacks in the UK and Europe.

But Saudi Arabia's UK embassy has labelled the claim "categorically false".

Tom Wilson, who wrote the right-leaning Henry Jackson Society's report, said: "While entities from across the Gulf and Iran have been guilty of advancing extremism, those in Saudi Arabia are undoubtedly at the top of the list.

"Research indicates that some Saudi individuals and foundations have been apparently heavily involved in exporting an illiberal, bigoted Wahhabi ideology."


May negotiates a trade deal with Saudi Arabia
The think-tank has called for a public inquiry into the issue.

The kingdom's 60-year campaign to export Wahhabism, a strict interpretation of Islam, has led to support for mosques and Islamic institutions that appear to have links to extremism, the organisation said.

It found there have been "numerous" cases of Britons who have joined jihadist groups in Iraq and Syria whose radicalisation is thought to be linked to foreign-funded institutions and preachers.

The Henry Jackson Society said foreign funding for British extremism comes mainly from governments and state-backed foundations in the Gulf, along with Iran.

Mr Wilson added: "There is a clear and growing link between foreign funding of Islamist extremism and the violent terrorism we have witnessed across the UK and Europe.


PM defends Saudi Arabia visit
"The key now is to get ahead of the issue and find out the full extent of what has been going on. A public inquiry would go some way to informing the debate."

Prime Minister Theresa May, who visited Saudi Arabia earlier this year, has faced accusations she is "kowtowing" to the kingdom by "suppressing" a report into the funding of extremist groups in the UK.

An inquiry was ordered by her predecessor David Cameron in 2015, but reports have suggested the findings may never be published because of the sensitivity of the information regarding Saudi Arabia.

Labour MP Dan Jarvis said the report "sheds light on what are extremely worrying links between Saudi Arabia and the funding of extremism here in the UK" and called on the Government to release the inquiry's report.

A Government spokesman said: "Defeating the evil ideology of Islamist extremism is one of the greatest challenges of our time.

"The Commission for Counter-Extremism, which the PM announced earlier this year, will have a key role to play in this fight.


Met Commissioner: We face a 'changing threat'
"We are determined to cut off the funding which fuels the evils of extremism and terrorism, and will work closely with international partners to tackle this shared global threat, including at the upcoming G20 summit."

The Saudi embassy said the kingdom "has not and does not support or fund any group that has direct or indirect links to any terrorist organisation".

It said in a statement: "Accusations that blame the Kingdom for radicalising a small number of individuals are baseless and lack credible evidence. Terrorist ideology knows no nationality, language or borders.

"All charitable donations to educational and religious establishments by the Saudi state are made to registered charities in the UK.

"Saudi charities are prohibited from transferring money abroad and cannot operate abroad except through the King Salman Humanitarian Aid and Relief Centre or the Saudi Red Crescent, which is a semi-government entity.

"Saudi Arabia has been at the forefront of fighting the spread of extremism and terrorism at home and abroad."

Sky news
 

SeaAb

Legendary Member
Staff member
Super Penguin
The Qatar crisis has nothing to do with Al Jazeera and everything to do with the war in Syria
Robert Fisk


The present Al Jazeera is the orphan stepchild of the earlier BBC version which the Saudis head-chopped from the air waves more than two decades ago

“Babies – they are just babies,” a veteran Al Jazeera man roared last weekend about the Gulf states. “They are childish, they are infantile, they are tribal.” And I could understand his anger. Even Sheikh Tamim al-Thani, the present Emir of Qatar, has never had much love for the satellite television channel. It was his father Hamad’s toy. Indeed, when Hamad paid a formal visit to the Doha campus of Al Jazeera, Tamim – soon to overthrow his Dad – remained ostentatiously at the outer door. Now, of course, thanks to Saudi Arabia, Al Jazeera has become a symbol of Qatar’s national sovereignty.

Press freedom advocates have been lathering up their fury for the undemocratic Saudis, demanding that none shall touch the sacred studios of a Qatari channel that has in fact been pretty miserable in its reporting of Gulf Arab affairs over the years – not least events in the highly undemocratic emirate of Qatar itself. Last year – and early this year – Al Jazeera dispensed with many of its staff. And over the past twelve months, freelance journalists paid by the Qataris were told they were off the payroll. In the last four weeks, the Qataris have invited them back – only to discover that they were already on the Saudi payroll.

So the beacons of press freedom in the Gulf burn not as brightly as we might wish. Al Jazeera’s Arabic channel – and its “Live” affiliate, which so openly supported the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt – were so harsh in their condemnation of Field Marshal President Abdul-Fattah al-Sissi of Egypt that they gave up any shred of impartiality. Several “Live” cameramen turned out, after Sissi’s coup d’etat, to have been members of the Brotherhood itself.

But that’s not really the point. The Qatar “crisis” – the inverted commas are necessary because this is a crisis as fake as the claims the Saudis are making against Qatar – is about taming the one Gulf nation which has the potential to outshine the Saudi kingdom and dictate the outcome of the Syria war. And it may well end in the destruction – real if not acknowledged – of the Gulf Cooperation Council, the GCC alliance of six Arab states which was nursed into life by the United States amid two earlier and very real crises: the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan and the Iranian revolution. It will be the ultimate irony if a mad American President’s “go-for-’em-boys” speech in Riyadh last month brings this about.

Trump’s boastful promise of lots of “beautiful” weapons for Qatar – followed by his Twitter post condemning Qatar for financially supporting “terror” – were just part of the comedy show for Americans who have grown used to their Commander in Chief’s insanity. But for the new Warrior Chief of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, defence minister and now Crown Prince Mohamed bin Salman (MbS), it provided the power to command the GCC to do his bidding. Trump hates the free media. Saudi Arabia hates free media. And we forget – and the BBC seems to forget – that it was Mohamed’s uncle, King Fahd, who put paid to the first version of an independent international channel in the Middle East. The doomed BBC Arabic Television was put together between the BBC and a Saudi giant called the Muwarid Group.

But no sooner had the BBC started to air critical documentaries on the Saudis themselves – part of the remit of its impartial news service – than the Saudis shut them down. Orbit, a Muwarid subsidiary, simply switched the BBC off the satellite in April 1996. Many of the BBC’s staff immediately emigrated – to the new Al Jazeera channel, which went on air from Qatar seven months later. The present Al Jazeera is thus the orphan stepchild of the earlier BBC version which the Saudis head-chopped from the air waves more than two decades ago. Of course, Al Jazeera carried graphic footage of the Palestinian intifadas, Arabs torn apart by American and British shellfire and dead British soldiers. But it was free to air Osama bin Laden’s sermons, support the Muslim Brotherhood – millions of whose members, especially in Jordan and Egypt are not “terrorists” – and even advertise the Islamist political platform of the Al Nusrah/al-Qaeda front.

And here we reach a critical point in the story of the “crisis” in the Gulf. For when Nusrah underwent one of its regular name-changes – the further from al-Qaeda the better, of course – to Tahrir al-Sham, Al Jazeera gave its leader a two-part interview in which the Islamists could explain how much they loved Christians and their fellow Shiite Muslims and were worthy of being regarded as the only serious opposition to Bashar al-Assad’s regime in Syria. These two one-hour programmes on Al Jazeera were highly sensitive because Saudi Islamists – let us never suggest these might include the Saudi government – have always favoured the vicious Isis over the more political (though often equally cruel) Nusrah. Furthermore, the emergence of the “new” Nusrah/al-Qaeda on Al Jazeera coincided with the almost total collapse of the now imaginary Free Syria Army – hitherto supported by Barack Obama, David Cameron and other fantasists.

Qatar, in other words, was playing a leading role in the Syrian war, supporting a group which the Saudis opposed while at the same time maintaining a quiet relationship with the regime itself, helping to free hostages held by Nusrah in both Syria and Lebanon. Most recently, Qatar even opened new proxy relations with the pro-Assad Shia Hezbollah movement in Lebanon after it approved the sending of two senior officials of the Sunni Palestinian Hamas organisation – hitherto funded and supported by Qatar – to speak to Hezbollah. It also agreed to the handing over of a Sunni extremist hiding in the Palestinian Ein el-Helweh camp in Sidon to the Lebanese intelligence service.

On top of all this, Qatar has just announced its plan to raise liquid natural gas capacity by 30 per cent, increasing production from its North Field which it shares with Iran. US gas producers may struggle to compete. Iran, as oil magnates know all too well, is ready to increase production on its side of the North Field. No wonder the Saudis are outraged. And perhaps, soon, the Americans. Even more so if a post-war Syria permits Qatar to run a pipeline across its territory to the Mediterranean and to Europe. Qatar, in other words, now needs Iran more than it needs Saudi Arabia.

So cloaked with threats about “terrorism”, the Saudis, Emiratis, Bahrainis and Egyptians have turned upon this – for them – very dangerous little emirate. How can MbS maintain a conflict with the Shia of the Middle East – and especially Yemen – if Qatar is collaborating with the Iranians? And with Nusrah. And Assad. And if Qatar is helped – let us not forget this – by the Kuwaiti “negotiators”, who are no enemies of the Iranians, and the Omanis who are sending food to Qatar and who engaged in naval manoeuvres with the Iranians only three months ago.

For the rest of the world, the Gulf “crisis” only shames the Arabs. The Israelis must be clapping – though they are backing the Saudis – and the Palestinians are forgotten (as usual) and the war goes on in Syria (and Iraq) as usual, and we are all transfixed by the infantile and tribal quarrels of some of the wealthiest human beings on earth.

The Qatar crisis has nothing to do with Al Jazeera and everything to do with the war in Syria | The Independent

 

Republican

Legendary Member
On top of all this, Qatar has just announced its plan to raise liquid natural gas capacity by 30 per cent, increasing production from its North Field which it shares with Iran. US gas producers may struggle to compete. Iran, as oil magnates know all too well, is ready to increase production on its side of the North Field. No wonder the Saudis are outraged. And perhaps, soon, the Americans. Even more so if a post-war Syria permits Qatar to run a pipeline across its territory to the Mediterranean and to Europe. Qatar, in other words, now needs Iran more than it needs Saudi Arabia.

Spot on
 

Venom

Legendary Member
Qatar just threw a wrench into Trump's plan for US ‘energy dominance’
Tom DiChristopher
Play Video


Qatar Petroleum on Wednesday announced plans to significantly raise natural gas production in the coming years, creating an obstacle to President Donald Trump's goal of "energy dominance."

The move threatens to add to a projected glut of liquefied natural gas, or LNG, as a wave of new projects come online in the coming years, including from the United States.

The Qatari state energy company said it will double the size of a planned project in the North Field, the massive natural gas reserve in the Persian Gulf that has underwritten the country's rapid rise to wealth. That will allow the country to hike its total output of LNG from 77 million tons a year to 100 million tons annually some time between 2022 and 2024, according to the company.


Yuri Gripas | Reuters

U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson (R) meets with Qatari Foreign Minister Sheikh Mohammed bin Abdulrahman Al Thani at the State Department in Washington, U.S., June 27, 2017.

Qatar is already the world's dominant LNG exporter, and the planned 30 percent hike over the next five to seven years could help it consolidate its grasp on the market.

The global market for LNG was 258 million tons last year, according to the International Gas Union.

U.S. companies hope to capitalize on a boom in natural gas production at home to grab a piece of the growing LNG market. Last week, the Trump administration touted LNG exports as a pillar of its plan to dominate the global energy trade.

Projected U.S. natural gas exports



Source: Energy Information Administration

Cheniere Energy currently operates the only LNG export terminal in the lower 48 states, but four others are under construction in Texas, Louisiana and Maryland. They are slated to come online by 2021 and will push U.S. export capacity to 9.2 billion cubic feet — nearly equal to top importer Japan's total LNG imports in 2015.

While demand is growing, analysts believe a surge in LNG export terminal construction will flood the market in the early 2020s, creating oversupply. The surge in Qatari output is expected to come online just as that flood hits. A supply imbalance could depress prices and make it harder to attract funding for new LNG export terminals.

There were more than a dozen U.S. terminals proposed as of May, according to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission.

The Trump administration has recently created a headache for Qatar in the LNG market.

In May, the Commerce Department reached an agreement with Beijing that will see China give state-owned companies the green light to negotiate long-term contracts with U.S. LNG exporters. Analysts told CNBC there is no guarantee the Chinese companies will import more American LNG, but they are likely to use the agreement to secure lower prices from Qatar and other exporters.



The Trump administration has also sought to make inroads with South Korea, the world's second largest LNG importer, last week during an event the White House dubbed "Energy Week."

The same week, South Korean President Moon Jae-in visited Washington, D.C., and Korean conglomerate SK Group signed memorandums of understandingto develop U.S. shale gas with Continental Resources and GE. Sempra Energy inked an agreement to explore jointly developing a Texas LNG projectwith the Korea Gas Corporation.

Play Video


Polices floated by the new South Korean president could offset the glut in coming years, said Massimo Di-Odoardo, head of global gas and LNG research at Wood Mackenzie. Those include reducing use of coal-fired plants and nuclear power, while increasing electricity generation from natural gas and renewable energy.

"If the president is successful in implementing those policies ... that certainly provides upside to the market," he said. "This certainly has the potential to shift the market more quickly than a lot have anticipated."

Still, U.S. companies face a significant challenge in South Korea: Qatari supplies accounted for 37 percent of its LNG imports in 2015.

CNBC
 

theMightyRedV

Well-Known Member
All the verbal diarrhea above does not answer the question at hand: How can a people be subject to genocide, while their population numbers increase?

Oh, since you're fond of graphics, so am I:

LOLLL @ Jewish homeland in 1920. Lek roo7 []
 
Last edited by a moderator:

proIsrael-nonIsraeli

Legendary Member
"Qatar Petroleum on Wednesday announced plans to significantly raise natural gas production in the coming years, creating an obstacle to President Donald Trump's goal of "energy dominance.""

I am confused, why is it bad for The USA?

BTW, Trump talks about "energy independence", not about "energy dominance".


Qatar just threw a wrench into Trump's plan for US ‘energy dominance’
Tom DiChristopher
Play Video


Qatar Petroleum on Wednesday announced plans to significantly raise natural gas production in the coming years, creating an obstacle to President Donald Trump's goal of "energy dominance."

The move threatens to add to a projected glut of liquefied natural gas, or LNG, as a wave of new projects come online in the coming years, including from the United States.

The Qatari state energy company said it will double the size of a planned project in the North Field, the massive natural gas reserve in the Persian Gulf that has underwritten the country's rapid rise to wealth. That will allow the country to hike its total output of LNG from 77 million tons a year to 100 million tons annually some time between 2022 and 2024, according to the company.


Yuri Gripas | Reuters

U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson (R) meets with Qatari Foreign Minister Sheikh Mohammed bin Abdulrahman Al Thani at the State Department in Washington, U.S., June 27, 2017.

Qatar is already the world's dominant LNG exporter, and the planned 30 percent hike over the next five to seven years could help it consolidate its grasp on the market.

The global market for LNG was 258 million tons last year, according to the International Gas Union.

U.S. companies hope to capitalize on a boom in natural gas production at home to grab a piece of the growing LNG market. Last week, the Trump administration touted LNG exports as a pillar of its plan to dominate the global energy trade.

Projected U.S. natural gas exports



Source: Energy Information Administration

Cheniere Energy currently operates the only LNG export terminal in the lower 48 states, but four others are under construction in Texas, Louisiana and Maryland. They are slated to come online by 2021 and will push U.S. export capacity to 9.2 billion cubic feet — nearly equal to top importer Japan's total LNG imports in 2015.

While demand is growing, analysts believe a surge in LNG export terminal construction will flood the market in the early 2020s, creating oversupply. The surge in Qatari output is expected to come online just as that flood hits. A supply imbalance could depress prices and make it harder to attract funding for new LNG export terminals.

There were more than a dozen U.S. terminals proposed as of May, according to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission.

The Trump administration has recently created a headache for Qatar in the LNG market.

In May, the Commerce Department reached an agreement with Beijing that will see China give state-owned companies the green light to negotiate long-term contracts with U.S. LNG exporters. Analysts told CNBC there is no guarantee the Chinese companies will import more American LNG, but they are likely to use the agreement to secure lower prices from Qatar and other exporters.



The Trump administration has also sought to make inroads with South Korea, the world's second largest LNG importer, last week during an event the White House dubbed "Energy Week."

The same week, South Korean President Moon Jae-in visited Washington, D.C., and Korean conglomerate SK Group signed memorandums of understandingto develop U.S. shale gas with Continental Resources and GE. Sempra Energy inked an agreement to explore jointly developing a Texas LNG projectwith the Korea Gas Corporation.

Play Video


Polices floated by the new South Korean president could offset the glut in coming years, said Massimo Di-Odoardo, head of global gas and LNG research at Wood Mackenzie. Those include reducing use of coal-fired plants and nuclear power, while increasing electricity generation from natural gas and renewable energy.

"If the president is successful in implementing those policies ... that certainly provides upside to the market," he said. "This certainly has the potential to shift the market more quickly than a lot have anticipated."

Still, U.S. companies face a significant challenge in South Korea: Qatari supplies accounted for 37 percent of its LNG imports in 2015.

CNBC
 

The Bidenator

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
"Qatar Petroleum on Wednesday announced plans to significantly raise natural gas production in the coming years, creating an obstacle to President Donald Trump's goal of "energy dominance.""

I am confused, why is it bad for The USA?

BTW, Trump talks about "energy independence", not about "energy dominance".

Actually, they should raise natural gas production and building a pipeline towards Europe with help of US. That will hurt Russia tremendously, and will be a win for Trump admin.
 
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