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LGBT Rights in Lebanon

Jo

Administrator
Master Penguin
How would you react if your son/daughter came out to you as gay?

Here is a recent vox pop of the #Lebanese public opinion:

 

Jo

Administrator
Master Penguin
Coming Out in Lebanon
Openly gay, lesbian and transgender people face persecution across the Arab world. The exception may be in Lebanon, which has slowly grown more tolerant thanks to the work of activists.



Throughout the Arab world, gay, lesbian and transgender people face formidable obstacles to living a life of openness and acceptance in conservative societies.

Although Jordan decriminalized same-sex behavior in 1951, the gay community remains marginalized. Qatar, Sudan, the United Arab Emirates and Yemen all outlaw same-sex relations. In Saudi Arabia, homosexuality can be punished by flogging or death.

In Egypt, at least 76 people have been arrested in a crackdown since September, when a fan waved a rainbow flag during a concert by Mashrou’ Leila, a Lebanese band with an openly gay singer.

If there is one exception, it has been Lebanon. While the law can still penalize homosexual acts, Lebanese society has slowly grown more tolerant as activists have worked for more rights and visibility.

In 2013, the Lebanese Psychiatric Society said homosexuality did not need to be treated as a mental disorder. Judges have rejected cases being prosecuted under a law that makes sex “contrary to nature” illegal. And this year, Lebanon held its first ever Beirut Pride Week, full of events, if not an actual parade.

What has helped make the difference is a culturally diverse society, a mostly independent media and the relative ease of registering nongovernmental organizations, says Georges Azzi, who runs the Arab Foundation for Freedoms and Equality, an advocacy group.

But members of the community have themselves served as pioneers in a region where coming out is always risky. They have all crossed difficult personal thresholds. Their views differ on how far Lebanon has actually come and how to further push change.

Some live discreetly. Some openly. And some have become activists so that others can come out. Here are some of their stories.



[...]

Read more here: Coming Out in Lebanon
 

JustLeb

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
Coming Out in Lebanon
Openly gay, lesbian and transgender people face persecution across the Arab world. The exception may be in Lebanon, which has slowly grown more tolerant thanks to the work of activists.



Throughout the Arab world, gay, lesbian and transgender people face formidable obstacles to living a life of openness and acceptance in conservative societies.

Although Jordan decriminalized same-sex behavior in 1951, the gay community remains marginalized. Qatar, Sudan, the United Arab Emirates and Yemen all outlaw same-sex relations. In Saudi Arabia, homosexuality can be punished by flogging or death.

In Egypt, at least 76 people have been arrested in a crackdown since September, when a fan waved a rainbow flag during a concert by Mashrou’ Leila, a Lebanese band with an openly gay singer.

If there is one exception, it has been Lebanon. While the law can still penalize homosexual acts, Lebanese society has slowly grown more tolerant as activists have worked for more rights and visibility.

In 2013, the Lebanese Psychiatric Society said homosexuality did not need to be treated as a mental disorder. Judges have rejected cases being prosecuted under a law that makes sex “contrary to nature” illegal. And this year, Lebanon held its first ever Beirut Pride Week, full of events, if not an actual parade.

What has helped make the difference is a culturally diverse society, a mostly independent media and the relative ease of registering nongovernmental organizations, says Georges Azzi, who runs the Arab Foundation for Freedoms and Equality, an advocacy group.

But members of the community have themselves served as pioneers in a region where coming out is always risky. They have all crossed difficult personal thresholds. Their views differ on how far Lebanon has actually come and how to further push change.

Some live discreetly. Some openly. And some have become activists so that others can come out. Here are some of their stories.



[...]

Read more here: Coming Out in Lebanon


DISGUSTING....
 

Apostate

Your will, my hands.
Orange Room Supporter
How would you react if your son/daughter came out to you as gay?

Here is a recent vox pop of the #Lebanese public opinion:


I'd rather my son/daughter come out as a gay than a Sheikh or Priest or a weird shit like that.
A gay person isn't hurting anybody.
 

spacecreature

Well-Known Member
I was walking in Beirut downtown the other day and came accross this lesbian and gay bank just thought it was funny ;)
20171230_161708.jpg
 
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Reactions: Jo

Indie

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
When I see the transgender debacle happening in the West, where I live, I remember that people used to tell me opening the door to gay rights would open the door to a whole bunch of other stuff. I didn't believe them then, but they were right.

It is better for Lebanon not to go down that path.

That being said, I am against criminalizing or harming people for being gay or trans. But there is a difference between the latter and an "anything goes" attitude.

Here is a balanced documentary that is being banned by national broadcasters in the West as a result of the trans lobby. Highly respectable people are literally losing their jobs, free speech is being criminalized, and people are being harassed if they even dare to offer a middle-ground perspective (forget being fully anti-trans). The situation has reached dystopian proportions and it is simply unacceptable.


In case the video stops working, you can find it elsewhere online. The documentary is called "Transgender Kids: Who Knows Best?"
 

!Aoune32

Well-Known Member
Coming Out in Lebanon
Openly gay, lesbian and transgender people face persecution across the Arab world. The exception may be in Lebanon, which has slowly grown more tolerant thanks to the work of activists.



Throughout the Arab world, gay, lesbian and transgender people face formidable obstacles to living a life of openness and acceptance in conservative societies.

Although Jordan decriminalized same-sex behavior in 1951, the gay community remains marginalized. Qatar, Sudan, the United Arab Emirates and Yemen all outlaw same-sex relations. In Saudi Arabia, homosexuality can be punished by flogging or death.

In Egypt, at least 76 people have been arrested in a crackdown since September, when a fan waved a rainbow flag during a concert by Mashrou’ Leila, a Lebanese band with an openly gay singer.

If there is one exception, it has been Lebanon. While the law can still penalize homosexual acts, Lebanese society has slowly grown more tolerant as activists have worked for more rights and visibility.

In 2013, the Lebanese Psychiatric Society said homosexuality did not need to be treated as a mental disorder. Judges have rejected cases being prosecuted under a law that makes sex “contrary to nature” illegal. And this year, Lebanon held its first ever Beirut Pride Week, full of events, if not an actual parade.

What has helped make the difference is a culturally diverse society, a mostly independent media and the relative ease of registering nongovernmental organizations, says Georges Azzi, who runs the Arab Foundation for Freedoms and Equality, an advocacy group.

But members of the community have themselves served as pioneers in a region where coming out is always risky. They have all crossed difficult personal thresholds. Their views differ on how far Lebanon has actually come and how to further push change.

Some live discreetly. Some openly. And some have become activists so that others can come out. Here are some of their stories.



[...]

Read more here: Coming Out in Lebanon

3anjad disgusting.
yel3an ekhta maba2 fik tle2e in Lebanon rjeil aslan. the way they talk the way they act kel chi bi2oul eno they are homosexuals. year after year you find more and more people saro heike.
 

JustLeb

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
When I see the transgender debacle happening in the West, where I live, I remember that people used to tell me opening the door to gay rights would open the door to a whole bunch of other stuff. I didn't believe them then, but they were right.

It is better for Lebanon not to go down that path.

That being said, I am against criminalizing or harming people for being gay or trans. But there is a difference between the latter and an "anything goes" attitude.

Here is a balanced documentary that is being banned by national broadcasters in the West as a result of the trans lobby. Highly respectable people are literally losing their jobs, free speech is being criminalized, and people are being harassed if they even dare to offer a middle-ground perspective (forget being fully anti-trans). The situation has reached dystopian proportions and it is simply unacceptable.


In case the video stops working, you can find it elsewhere online. The documentary is called "Transgender Kids: Who Knows Best?"

WTF.....
 
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