Living under Al Saud

My Moria Moon

My Moria Moon

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
Interesting debate about the certified ISIS kingdom

 
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  • SeaAb

    SeaAb

    Legendary Member
    Staff member
    Super Penguin
    @Iron Maiden Shoof shu sar bil music festival in Saudi. Check out the hashtag kamen...






     
    Iron Maiden

    Iron Maiden

    Paragon of Bacon
    Orange Room Supporter
    @Iron Maiden Shoof shu sar bil music festival in Saudi. Check out the hashtag kamen...






    they need a sunni sheikh and and a shia sheikh to hold hands and walk around the concert venue, gheir hek ma fi hall

    this is tainting MBS’s vision for a modern ksa ya 3ayb el shoum
     
    NiceV

    NiceV

    Well-Known Member
    For the first time in KSA
    They celebrate Christians new year
    السعودية تحتفل برأس السنة الميلادية.. للمرة الأولى في تاريخها!
    أخبار فنية - الأربعاء 25 كانون الأول 2019 - 09:00 -

    على غير عادتها تستعد المملكة العربية السعودية لإقامة حفلات فنية في ليلة رأس السنة الميلادية 2020 وذلك للمرة الأولى في تاريخها.
    وكشف حساب "بلاتينوم ليست" الخاص بالفعاليات الفنية في السعودية عبر موقع ”تويتر“ عن تفاصيل الفعاليات المقررة يوم الـ 31 من ديسمبر/ الجاري.
    وقال الحساب في التعليق على "البوستر": "ليلة رأس السنة الميلادية في الرياض تشمل فعاليات عدة ومفاجآت كثيرة من ضمنها العد التنازلي للعام الجديد 2020، وعرض ناري، ودي جي، إلى جانب فعاليات أخرى".

    ومن المقرر أن يحيي "فنان العرب" محمد عبده حفلا بالرياض هو الأول ضمن سهرات ليلة رأس السنة 2020 هناك، ويحمل الحفل الذي يأتي ضمن موسم الرياض عنوان "ليلة فنان العرب".
    وأعلن المستشار تركي آل الشيخ رئيس هيئة الترفيه أنها ستكون ليلة لا مثيل لها في مشوار "أبو نورة" وحافلة بالمفاجآت.
    وشهدت العاصمة السعودية الرياض الأيام الماضية عددا كبيرا من الحفلات والجلسات والفعاليات الفنية بدأت مع انطلاقة الموسم في نهاية أكتوبر ومستمرة حتى نهاية مارس 2020 بعد تمديدها.
    ورغم القفزات الإصلاحية الهائلة التي شهدتها السعودية، ضمن خطة التحول التي يقودها ولي العهد الأمير محمد بن سلمان، فإن المملكة ظلت حتى 2018 غائبة تماما عن احتفالات رأس السنة الميلادية لاعتقاد أنصار التيار المحافظ، أن احتفالات رأس السنة "بدعة" دخيلة على المجتمع الإسلامي وعاداته وتقاليده.
    وفي وقت سابق تمنى الكاتب السعودي محمد العمر، أن تحذو بلاده حذو الدول الأخرى قائلا: "عقبال السعودية في ليلة رأس السنة 2020 ونبهر العالم" وهو ما تم بالفعل.
    وعلى صعيد الحفلات الأخرى، سيكون لنجوم الغناء الغربي فرصة إحياء حفلات ليلة رأس السنة في أبوظبي والقاهرة، حيث يحيي النجم الأمريكي برونو مارس الحائز 11 جائزة غرامي، حفل أبوظبي في ميدان دو بجزيرة ياس، بينما تحيي كيتي بيري حفلها أمام الأهرامات في القاهرة.
     
    proIsrael-nonIsraeli

    proIsrael-nonIsraeli

    Legendary Member
    @Iron Maiden :cigar:
    "racism & misogyny"?
    What does it have to do with racism - does it mean that only some races can sing in public, but not others.
    What does it have to do with misogyny - does it mean that only men are allowed to sing in public, but not women.
     
    SeaAb

    SeaAb

    Legendary Member
    Staff member
    Super Penguin
    "racism & misogyny"?
    What does it have to do with racism - does it mean that only some races can sing in public, but not others.
    What does it have to do with misogyny - does it mean that only men are allowed to sing in public, but not women.
    The amount of racist comments this music video got was astounding. I had no idea racism was this rooted in their society.
     
    proIsrael-nonIsraeli

    proIsrael-nonIsraeli

    Legendary Member
    The amount of racist comments this music video got was astounding. I had no idea racism was this rooted in their society.
    I did not follow the tweet, so maybe comments were racist.
    However, I am under impression that tweet itself was claiming that criminalizing (however backward it might be) public singing ALONE constitutes racism and misogyny.

    People making such empty claims are akin to that Smollett guy - they make society at large deaf to real stuff.
     
    Picasso

    Picasso

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Saudi Arabia Abolishes Flogging as a Punishment for Crime

    The most high-profile flogging in recent years was of Saudi blogger Raif Badawi who was sentenced to 10 years in prison and 1,000 lashes in 2014 on charges of “insulting” Islam.

    BEIRUT, Lebanon — When judges in Saudi Arabia convict someone of a crime, they now have one fewer punishment to hand down. As of this month, they can no longer have people flogged.

    The decision to ban flogging, which the state-run human rights commission confirmed on Saturday, removes one aspect of the kingdom’s justice system that has often generated criticism abroad.

    While Saudi officials hailed the move as a bold reform by the kingdom’s crown prince and de facto ruler, Mohammed bin Salman, Western human rights campaigners gave more muted reactions.

    “I would not call it a breakthrough,” said Adam Coogle, a researcher at Human Rights Watch who tracks Saudi Arabia. “I would call it a positive step.”

    Dampening his enthusiasm, he said, were what he called the many other aspects of the kingdom’s justice system that remain problematic, including the ability to hold people for months without charge, execution by beheading and the lack of a unified penal code.

    “I surely hope he intends to go after the whole justice system, because it is very flawed in both regulations and implementation,” Mr. Coogle said of Prince Mohammed.

    Saudi Arabia is one of the world’s few absolute monarchies and administers justice based on Shariah law. Drinking alcohol is a criminal offense, and drug trafficking often a capital crime. While stoning as a punishment for adultery and the amputation of limbs for theft remain technically on the books, they are rarely, if ever, carried out.

    The lack of a unified penal code gives judges great leeway in sentencing, and flogging was most often part of the punishment for so-called moral crimes such as public drunkenness or what judges deemed to be inappropriate contact between unrelated women and men.

    Some of those offenses are now seen as less grave in Saudi Arabia because of changes pushed through by Prince Mohammed. As part of his plans to diversify the economy and open up society, he has taken the power to arrest away from the kingdom’s religious police and expanded entertainment opportunities by opening movie theaters and bringing in rock concerts, professional wrestling tournaments and monster truck rallies.

    At least in Saudi cities, it is much more common to see women socializing openly with men and not covering their hair or faces than it was a few years ago.

    Saudi officials hailed the flogging ban as part of these changes.

    “This reform is a momentous step forward in Saudi Arabia’s human rights agenda, and merely one of many recent reforms in the kingdom,” Awwad Alawwad, the president of the kingdom’s human rights commission, told Reuters.

    The decision to replace flogging as a punishment with jail time and fines was made sometime this month and announced internally by the kingdom’s top court, Reuters reported.

    Floggings tended to be done with a wooden cane, the swift blows going up and down the backside of the sentenced person. In the past, they were often carried out in public, adding a social stigma to the physical pain inflicted.

    “It is meant to be more of a humiliation,” said Mr. Coogle of Human Rights Watch, adding that he had not heard of reports of injuries.

    Reports of public floggings have grown rare in recent years, either because they were being administered in prisons or not at all.

    The kingdom’s most famous flogging case was that of Raif Badawi, who ran a website that published material criticizing Saudi religious figures, lauding Western legal systems and arguing that atheists should be free to state their views without being punished.

    That angered Saudi conservatives, who denounced him.

    The Saudi authorities arrested Mr. Badawi in 2012 and put him on trial on charges that included cybercrime and disobeying his father. In 2014, he was sentenced to 10 years in prison, fined more than a quarter-million dollars, and ordered to endure 1,000 blows with a cane in weekly installments over several months.

    But a video of the first installment, in front of a mosque in the Red Sea city of Jeddah, set off international outrage and Mr. Badawi was never caned again. While he remains in prison, he has been embraced by some in the West as symbol of the kingdom’s intolerance of freedom of thought and expression. In 2015, he was awarded the European Union’s top human rights award and nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize.


    NYTimes

    Iran: Young man flogged 80 times for drinking alcohol as a child

    (...)

    Article 265 of Iran’s Islamic Penal Code states that the punishment for consumption of alcohol by a Muslim is 80 lashes.

    More than 100 “offences” are punishable by flogging under Iranian law. The offences include theft, assault, vandalism, defamation and fraud. They also cover acts that should not be criminalized, such as adultery, intimate relationships between unmarried men and women, “breach of public morals” and consensual same-sex sexual relations.

    In January 2016, the Committee on the Rights of the Child, the UN body that monitors implementation of the Convention on the Rights of the Child by state parties, urged Iran to “immediately repeal all provisions which authorize or condone cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment of children”.
     
    AtheistForYeezus

    AtheistForYeezus

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Saudi Arabia Abolishes Flogging as a Punishment for Crime

    The most high-profile flogging in recent years was of Saudi blogger Raif Badawi who was sentenced to 10 years in prison and 1,000 lashes in 2014 on charges of “insulting” Islam.

    BEIRUT, Lebanon — When judges in Saudi Arabia convict someone of a crime, they now have one fewer punishment to hand down. As of this month, they can no longer have people flogged.

    The decision to ban flogging, which the state-run human rights commission confirmed on Saturday, removes one aspect of the kingdom’s justice system that has often generated criticism abroad.

    While Saudi officials hailed the move as a bold reform by the kingdom’s crown prince and de facto ruler, Mohammed bin Salman, Western human rights campaigners gave more muted reactions.

    “I would not call it a breakthrough,” said Adam Coogle, a researcher at Human Rights Watch who tracks Saudi Arabia. “I would call it a positive step.”

    Dampening his enthusiasm, he said, were what he called the many other aspects of the kingdom’s justice system that remain problematic, including the ability to hold people for months without charge, execution by beheading and the lack of a unified penal code.

    “I surely hope he intends to go after the whole justice system, because it is very flawed in both regulations and implementation,” Mr. Coogle said of Prince Mohammed.

    Saudi Arabia is one of the world’s few absolute monarchies and administers justice based on Shariah law. Drinking alcohol is a criminal offense, and drug trafficking often a capital crime. While stoning as a punishment for adultery and the amputation of limbs for theft remain technically on the books, they are rarely, if ever, carried out.

    The lack of a unified penal code gives judges great leeway in sentencing, and flogging was most often part of the punishment for so-called moral crimes such as public drunkenness or what judges deemed to be inappropriate contact between unrelated women and men.

    Some of those offenses are now seen as less grave in Saudi Arabia because of changes pushed through by Prince Mohammed. As part of his plans to diversify the economy and open up society, he has taken the power to arrest away from the kingdom’s religious police and expanded entertainment opportunities by opening movie theaters and bringing in rock concerts, professional wrestling tournaments and monster truck rallies.

    At least in Saudi cities, it is much more common to see women socializing openly with men and not covering their hair or faces than it was a few years ago.

    Saudi officials hailed the flogging ban as part of these changes.

    “This reform is a momentous step forward in Saudi Arabia’s human rights agenda, and merely one of many recent reforms in the kingdom,” Awwad Alawwad, the president of the kingdom’s human rights commission, told Reuters.

    The decision to replace flogging as a punishment with jail time and fines was made sometime this month and announced internally by the kingdom’s top court, Reuters reported.

    Floggings tended to be done with a wooden cane, the swift blows going up and down the backside of the sentenced person. In the past, they were often carried out in public, adding a social stigma to the physical pain inflicted.

    “It is meant to be more of a humiliation,” said Mr. Coogle of Human Rights Watch, adding that he had not heard of reports of injuries.

    Reports of public floggings have grown rare in recent years, either because they were being administered in prisons or not at all.

    The kingdom’s most famous flogging case was that of Raif Badawi, who ran a website that published material criticizing Saudi religious figures, lauding Western legal systems and arguing that atheists should be free to state their views without being punished.

    That angered Saudi conservatives, who denounced him.

    The Saudi authorities arrested Mr. Badawi in 2012 and put him on trial on charges that included cybercrime and disobeying his father. In 2014, he was sentenced to 10 years in prison, fined more than a quarter-million dollars, and ordered to endure 1,000 blows with a cane in weekly installments over several months.

    But a video of the first installment, in front of a mosque in the Red Sea city of Jeddah, set off international outrage and Mr. Badawi was never caned again. While he remains in prison, he has been embraced by some in the West as symbol of the kingdom’s intolerance of freedom of thought and expression. In 2015, he was awarded the European Union’s top human rights award and nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize.


    NYTimes

    Iran: Young man flogged 80 times for drinking alcohol as a child

    (...)

    Article 265 of Iran’s Islamic Penal Code states that the punishment for consumption of alcohol by a Muslim is 80 lashes.

    More than 100 “offences” are punishable by flogging under Iranian law. The offences include theft, assault, vandalism, defamation and fraud. They also cover acts that should not be criminalized, such as adultery, intimate relationships between unmarried men and women, “breach of public morals” and consensual same-sex sexual relations.

    In January 2016, the Committee on the Rights of the Child, the UN body that monitors implementation of the Convention on the Rights of the Child by state parties, urged Iran to “immediately repeal all provisions which authorize or condone cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment of children”.
    Saudi Arabia is starting to look more civilized than Iran.
     
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