Living under Iran Mullahs

proIsrael-nonIsraeli

proIsrael-nonIsraeli

Legendary Member
Between North Korea and Iran I predict the Iranian mullahs regime will go first. I am inclined to think that, with people in a theocracy, and especially younger generations, it is easier to revolt against the highest imposed authority when it is a non-physical, abstract notion, God in this case, than it is in a communist dictatorship against an all present physical entity of flesh and blood, fatso Kill All Fun in N.Korea's case.
"Between North Korea and Iran I predict the Iranian mullahs regime will go first" - I have the same feeling.
 
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  • SAVO

    SAVO

    Member
    Between North Korea and Iran I predict the Iranian mullahs regime will go first. I am inclined to think that, with people in a theocracy, and especially younger generations, it is easier to revolt against the highest imposed authority when it is a non-physical, abstract notion, God in this case, than it is in a communist dictatorship against an all present physical entity of flesh and blood, fatso Kill All Fun in N.Korea's case.
    ohh ..

    u live out of reality little boy ..
    Kim Jong Un is doing great and he is a leader of a good qualities..
    The future of korean Peninsula will be rewritten once the korean unity is achieved,..
    yankees need to get out from korean peninsula ..

    for now enjoy the concert ..

     
    HalaMadrid

    HalaMadrid

    Active Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    ohh ..

    u live out of reality little boy ..
    Kim Jong Un is doing great and he is a leader of a good qualities..
    The future of korean Peninsula will be rewritten once the korean unity is achieved,..
    yankees need to get out from korean peninsula ..

    for now enjoy the concert ..

    It might also be because he learned the lesson that you get nukes first negotiate after. I dunno just a thought.
     
    Picasso

    Picasso

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    The soviet union had many nuclear bombs, it ended up disintegrated.
    Pakistan has a population living in misery and suffocated by extremism, yet they have nuclear bombs.

    Excuse SAVO, his standards are Stalinist.

    Next time @SAVO when you want to address My Moria Moon, you have to look high up. Mafhoum?
     
    Picasso

    Picasso

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    ‘Abandoned and Forgotten’: Jailed Academic Writes of Despair in Iran

    By Megan Specia



    A British-Australian woman, Kylie Moore-Gilbert, was detained in September 2018 while attending a conference. In a series of letters, she described the hellishness of her confinement.


    LONDON — “I am entirely alone in Iran,” she wrote in one letter. “In addition to all the pain I have endured here, I feel like I am abandoned and forgotten.”

    Those words were written by a British-Australian academic, Kylie Moore-Gilbert, who has been held in an Iranian prison for more than a year — including long stretches of solitary confinement — in a series of letters published by British news outlets this week.

    Ms. Moore-Gilbert was detained in Iran in September 2018 while attending a conference. She was later convicted of spying and sentenced to 10 years in prison. She is being held in Evin Prison in Tehran in solitary confinement in a high-security wing run by the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps.

    Detailing the harrowing conditions, Ms. Moore-Gilbert wrote about her deteriorating health, begged to be released from the wing where she had spent much of her time behind bars and rejected bids by the Iranian authorities to recruit her as a spy.

    “I have no friends or family here and in addition to all the pain I have endured here, I feel like I am abandoned and forgotten, that after so many times of asking my embassy, I still have no money at all to endure all of this.”

    The letters, addressed to three Iranian officials, are believed to have been written in Persian between June and December 2019, before being smuggled out of the jail by an intermediary and published by The Times of London and The Guardian.

    Ms. Moore-Gilbert accused the Revolutionary Guards of “playing an awful game with me.”

    “I’m taking psychiatric medications, but these 10 months that I have spent here have gravely damaged my mental health,” Ms. Moore-Gilbert wrote in a letter dated July 2019. “I am still denied phone calls and visitations, and I am afraid that my mental and emotional state may further deteriorate if I remain in this extremely restrictive detention ward.”

    The letters were revealed at a time when the already strained relationship between Iran and the West has drastically deteriorated, after the American killing of an Iranian general and subsequent retaliatory strikes from Iran. Ms. Moore-Gilbert is just one of several Westerners and dual nationals being held in Iranian prisons on charges that their families and officials say are unfounded.

    Ms. Moore-Gilbert, a Cambridge-educated professor in Islamic studies at the University of Melbourne, denies the charges against her, as do her colleagues and family. She is being held at the same notorious Tehran prison as Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe, a British-Iranian arrested in 2016 and charged with espionage.


    Many fear that the women are being used as bargaining chips in the tensions between Iran and the West.

    Richard Ratcliffe, Ms. Zaghari-Ratcliffe’s husband, said that he had seen the letters and that they spoke to the traumatizing conditions faced by those arbitrarily detained in Iran.

    He urged the British and Australian governments, as well as the broader international community, to take a harsher stance on Iran’s arbitrary detention of foreign nationals.

    Ms. Zaghari-Ratcliffe, a program director at the Thomson Reuters Foundation, was detained in Tehran while trying to return to Britain after visiting relatives in Iran with her husband and young daughter. She was accused of plotting to overthrow Iran’s government, a charge her family and the foundation have vigorously denied.

    Mr. Ratcliffe said that the arrests of his wife, of Ms. Moore-Gilbert and of other foreign nationals were akin to the taking of hostages, adding that governments needed to take a stronger stance to gain their release.

    “I think the failure by the international community to call out Iran’s hostage-taking for what it is has enabled the growth of this practice,” Mr. Ratcliffe said. “The refusal to see things as they are does not protect the people in the middle of it.”

    But, he also noted, the priority should be on securing Ms. Moore-Gilbert’s release from solitary detention, which had clearly impacted her mental and physical health.

    “The only thing that matters is getting her out of solitary confinement,” Mr. Ratcliffe said. “Everything else can wait for another day.”

    The Australian authorities first confirmed Ms. Moore-Gilbert’s detention nearly a year after her arrest, when it was revealed that a British-Australian blogger and her Australian boyfriend were also being held. The blogger and her boyfriend were released in October in an apparent prisoner swap.

    In another letter that Ms. Moore-Gilbert wrote to her Iranian case manager, she stated her “official and definitive rejection of your offer to me to work with the intelligence branch” of the Revolutionary Guards.

    “I am not a spy. I have never been a spy and I have no interest to work for a spying organization in any country,” she wrote, according to The Times of London. She said that she was innocent of all of the charges against her and that she had been the victim of “fabrications and trumped-up accusations.”

    A spokesman for the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade said that Ms. Moore-Gilbert’s case had been raised by Marise Payne, the foreign minister, in a meeting with her Iranian counterpart, Mohammad Javad Zarif, in India last week.

    “While we continue to work towards her release, we are doing everything possible in relation to the conditions of her imprisonment,” the spokesman said, according to the newspaper The Australian.

    Ms. Moore-Gilbert and her family have been receiving consular assistance from the Australian authorities, and the British Foreign Office is working in cooperation with the Australians. She was visited by Australian consular officials in December and January after being denied consular visits in the past, including during the months that her letters were written.

    The British Foreign Office said in a statement that it remained “extremely concerned about the welfare of British dual nationals detained in Iran,” and noted that Prime Minister Boris Johnson had raised those concerns with President Hassan Rouhani of Iran during a Jan. 9 meeting.

    The British Foreign Office advises citizens against all travel to Iran, citing a risk of arrest. A request to the Iranian Embassy in London for response to the letters was not immediately answered.

    Human rights groups and politicians in Australia and Britain expressed outrage after the details of the letters were published. Elaine Pearson, the Australia director for Human Rights Watch, said in a tweet on Monday that Ms. Moore-Gilbert had “already been in prison far too long” and urged the Australian government to “ramp up efforts to bring her home.”

    But Mr. Ratcliffe, along with many other activists who have campaigned for the release of the foreigners, said that he believed the diplomatic back-and-forth had fallen short and that the negotiations had stalled.

    “What’s going on is a game of chess,” Mr. Ratcliffe said, “where you’ve got innocent people being used.”


    NYTimes
     
    Picasso

    Picasso

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    More Iranians With British Links Held in Iran

    By Thomas Erdbrink and Rick Gladstone


    TEHRAN — Iran’s intelligence operatives have arrested two, and possibly three, Iranians with British connections in the past two months, human rights activists and others said Thursday.

    At least two of the three Iranians in question are also British citizens, and the arrests may be part of an attempt by the Iranian authorities to gain leverage in an old dispute with Britain over more than $400 million in undelivered weaponry.

    Aras Amiri, a 32-year-old art student and an employee of the British Council, a cultural organization governed by royal charter that promotes Britain abroad, is the latest known to have been arrested.

    Ms. Amiri, an Iranian citizen who has lived in Britain for about 10 years and traveled to Iran at least three times a year, has been in custody in Iran since March 14, a cousin in the United States, Mohsen Omrani, confirmed on Thursday.

    While some members of her family in Iran sought to keep the arrest quiet, Mr. Omrani said in a telephone interview, he had decided to publicize it, beginning with a Twitter post on Tuesday.

    Mr. Omrani said that while he understood the family’s concerns about angering the authorities by publicizing arrests, “what has been proven again and again is that the ones that don’t have any media coverage slip through the cracks.”

    The Center for Human Rights in Iran, a New York-based advocacy group, said in a posting on its website that Ms. Amiri has been incarcerated in a wing of Tehran’s Evin Prison operated by the Intelligence Ministry, which is “holding her without access to a lawyer on national security charges.”

    Without identifying Ms. Amiri by name, the British Council said, “We are aware that one of our staff has been detained in Iran while making a private family visit.”

    The British Council also denied that she had traveled to Iran on its behalf. “This colleague does not travel to Iran for work,” it said in its mailed statement. “She works in the U.K. to support and showcase the Iranian contemporary art scene.”

    At least one other Iranian with British connections arrested recently is a dual citizen of Britain and Iran. Abbas Edalat, an academic and antiwar activist, was arrested in mid-April, an Iranian judicial official confirmed last week. Mr. Edalat, a professor of computer science and mathematics at the Imperial College of London, had been invited to speak at an academic event in Tehran.

    The fate of another British-Iranian dual citizen, Mahan Abedin, is somewhat murkier. A writer and analyst generally favorable to the Iranian government, Mr. Abedin failed to return as scheduled on April 29 from a visit with family in Iran, said his publisher, Michael Hurst. His only contact with Mr. Abedin, he said, has been a brief note saying he was “fine” and to “please stop contacting me.”

    Iran Wire, a news website run by expatriate Iranian journalists, said on Monday that Mr. Abedin had been arrested on suspicion he conspired in an “infiltration” operation. Britain’s Foreign Office disputed that account.

    “We have been in contact with the family and they have confirmed that he is not currently in detention,” the office said Thursday in a statement.

    Iran’s motivations in such arrests are not always clear, but analysts generally tie them to policy disputes with the countries involved. Iran is currently holding about 30 dual citizens, among them at least five Iranian-Americans whose fate could be tied to President Trump’s self-imposed May 12 deadline to decide whether to scrap the 2015 nuclear agreement.

    Iran and the United States negotiated a mutual release of prisoners after the nuclear deal took effect in January 2016.

    Iran’s foreign minister, Mohammad Javad Zarif, said in April that Iran was open to prisoner talks, “If the United States changes its attitude.”

    At least two dual citizens of Britain and Iran have been imprisoned by the Iranian authorities on vaguely defined charges of espionage. Kamal Foroughi, a business consultant, has been held since 2011 and Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe, a researcher for the Thomson Reuters Foundation charity, has been detained since 2016.

    Speculation has grown in recent months that freedom for the Iranians with British connections may be tied to a longstanding legal dispute between Britain and Iran over Iran’s 1976 purchase of British tanks that were never delivered. Britain has said that it owes Iran up to 300 million pounds, a little over $400 million at current exchange rates, but that the precise sum has not been negotiated.

    A similar financial dispute over an old arms deal between Iran and the United States appeared to play a role in the 2016 release of Americans held by the Iranians, with the delivery of $400 million to Iran on the same day the nuclear deal took effect.


    NYTimes
    May 3, 2018
     
    Picasso

    Picasso

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    Orange Room Supporter
    Offering Iran Penalties and Aid
    U.S. Ramps Up Sanctions While Providing Medicine

    The double-barreled tactic of sending medicine to Iranians and penalizing its leaders is an effort to fuel frustration against the government in Tehran.

    WASHINGTON — The Trump administration on Thursday piled new economic sanctions onto its ever-growing pressure campaign against Iran, but it also opened access to medicine for cancer and organ transplant patients in an effort to turn Iranians against their leaders.

    The medicines are being sent to Iran through businesses in Switzerland, whose government has acted as a conduit between Washington and Tehran. Brian H. Hook, the State Department’s special envoy for Iran policy, said at least one European company had already delivered the prescriptions to patients.

    Mr. Hook accused Iran’s clerical government of diverting millions of dollars for medical supplies to buy items like electrical cable and tobacco products. In other cases, he said, Tehran sold medicines on the black market and used the profits to fund its military proxies in Yemen, Syria, Lebanon and Iraq.

    “I’m sure there are more examples we don’t know about, but the Iranian people know that their regime, not American sanctions, are to blame for their difficulties getting medical supplies,” Mr. Hook told reporters.

    The access to medicine was an effort to fuel Iranian frustration against Tehran after weeks of violent protests over gasoline prices and the government’s downing — and initial cover-up — of a Ukrainian commercial airline earlier this month while it launched missile strikes against American military bases in neighboring Iraq.

    Iran’s economy has been decimated by sanctions that the United States resumed against Tehran in 2018, when President Trump withdrew from a deal among world powers that limited Iran’s nuclear program. The Trump administration maintains that the deal, struck in 2015 under President Barack Obama, only strengthened the threat that it says Iran poses across the Middle East.

    The economic sanctions are intended to force Iran back into negotiations for a new deal, but Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, the country’s supreme leader, has refused.

    Mr. Hook also announced on Thursday a new round of economic penalties targeting the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran and its chief officer, Ali Akbar Salehi, for violating the limits on uranium enrichment as set under the 2015 agreement that Mr. Trump jettisoned.

    That accord is still recognized by other world powers, and European leaders see its preservation as the best way to keep Iran’s nuclear program in check while also pursuing new trade and business investments in the country.

    But Iran has slowly stepped back from key components of the deal, in a countermove to pressure Europe to help it avoid American sanctions.

    Mr. Salehi, a former foreign minister of Iran, helped negotiate the nuclear deal in its early stages. In early January — days before the Iranian military mistakenly shot down the Ukrainian jet — Tehran said it would no longer adhere to the accord’s limits on how many centrifuges it could install to enrich uranium, which is used in nuclear weapons, or the level at which it could be enriched.

    That caused the European signatories — Britain, France and Germany — to formally notify Iran that the deal was in grave danger of falling apart and that Tehran could, as a result, face international sanctions down the road.

    On Thursday, Mr. Hook called on the United Nations to return to its demands from before the nuclear deal to prohibit Iran from enriching uranium. He said Europe’s warning to Tehran this month signaled “a growing impatience by the international community with Iran threatening to expand its nuclear program.”


    NYTimes
     
    proIsrael-nonIsraeli

    proIsrael-nonIsraeli

    Legendary Member
    Offering Iran Penalties and Aid
    U.S. Ramps Up Sanctions While Providing Medicine

    The double-barreled tactic of sending medicine to Iranians and penalizing its leaders is an effort to fuel frustration against the government in Tehran.

    WASHINGTON — The Trump administration on Thursday piled new economic sanctions onto its ever-growing pressure campaign against Iran, but it also opened access to medicine for cancer and organ transplant patients in an effort to turn Iranians against their leaders.

    The medicines are being sent to Iran through businesses in Switzerland, whose government has acted as a conduit between Washington and Tehran. Brian H. Hook, the State Department’s special envoy for Iran policy, said at least one European company had already delivered the prescriptions to patients.

    Mr. Hook accused Iran’s clerical government of diverting millions of dollars for medical supplies to buy items like electrical cable and tobacco products. In other cases, he said, Tehran sold medicines on the black market and used the profits to fund its military proxies in Yemen, Syria, Lebanon and Iraq.

    “I’m sure there are more examples we don’t know about, but the Iranian people know that their regime, not American sanctions, are to blame for their difficulties getting medical supplies,” Mr. Hook told reporters.

    The access to medicine was an effort to fuel Iranian frustration against Tehran after weeks of violent protests over gasoline prices and the government’s downing — and initial cover-up — of a Ukrainian commercial airline earlier this month while it launched missile strikes against American military bases in neighboring Iraq.

    Iran’s economy has been decimated by sanctions that the United States resumed against Tehran in 2018, when President Trump withdrew from a deal among world powers that limited Iran’s nuclear program. The Trump administration maintains that the deal, struck in 2015 under President Barack Obama, only strengthened the threat that it says Iran poses across the Middle East.

    The economic sanctions are intended to force Iran back into negotiations for a new deal, but Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, the country’s supreme leader, has refused.

    Mr. Hook also announced on Thursday a new round of economic penalties targeting the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran and its chief officer, Ali Akbar Salehi, for violating the limits on uranium enrichment as set under the 2015 agreement that Mr. Trump jettisoned.

    That accord is still recognized by other world powers, and European leaders see its preservation as the best way to keep Iran’s nuclear program in check while also pursuing new trade and business investments in the country.

    But Iran has slowly stepped back from key components of the deal, in a countermove to pressure Europe to help it avoid American sanctions.

    Mr. Salehi, a former foreign minister of Iran, helped negotiate the nuclear deal in its early stages. In early January — days before the Iranian military mistakenly shot down the Ukrainian jet — Tehran said it would no longer adhere to the accord’s limits on how many centrifuges it could install to enrich uranium, which is used in nuclear weapons, or the level at which it could be enriched.

    That caused the European signatories — Britain, France and Germany — to formally notify Iran that the deal was in grave danger of falling apart and that Tehran could, as a result, face international sanctions down the road.

    On Thursday, Mr. Hook called on the United Nations to return to its demands from before the nuclear deal to prohibit Iran from enriching uranium. He said Europe’s warning to Tehran this month signaled “a growing impatience by the international community with Iran threatening to expand its nuclear program.”


    NYTimes
    We never sanction food and medicine and other such things.
     
    Rafidi

    Rafidi

    Legendary Member
    @SeaAb

    The daily Vaqaye’ Itiffaqqiye, citing a member of Khamenei’s so-called fatwa office, had reported back in August 2016 that “from the ayatollah’s point of view, women are only permitted to ride motorbikes or bicycles so long as it does not attract strangers or lead to corrupt behavior. Therefore, women should contemplate where and in what situation they will ride a bicycle. If they respect the said points, then riding bicycles for them would be permissible.”

    However, websites close to ultra-conservatives published comments Khamenei made 21 years ago at a meeting with the staff of the Physical Education Organization, in which he maintained, “It is improper for girls to ride bicycles on the streets of Tehran. And ostentation and attracting strangers is also forbidden for women in sports.”

    President Hassan Rouhani’s deputy for women affairs, Shahindokht Molaverdi, asserted shortly after, “According to the supreme leader’s office, riding bicycles by women is permissible, provided they respect the principles of shari’a law.”

    Less than two weeks later, security and police forces halted a prescheduled plan for what they dubbed family-riding bicycles, supporting a campaign labeled as Tuesdays Without Vehicles.

    The campaign was initiated by environmental activists in the province of Arak and was supported by the Department of Environment.

    The head of the department went even further, declaring it would be prepared to provide loans for those interested in buying bicycles.

    But the whole campaign was aborted when Sunni Friday Prayer leader in the mainly Kurdish-populated city of Marivan stepped in and bitterly attacked the initiative. Consequently, many Marivani women were detained while riding bicycles in support of the Tuesdays Without Vehicles campaign.

    A group of women in Tehran, carrying banners, citing Khamenei as saying, “Women riding bicycles is legal as well as religiously legitimate”, unsuccessfully tried to revive the campaign.

    That’s when Khamenei stepped in again, and in September 2016 announced, “By riding bicycles, women often attract the attention of male strangers and expose society to debauchery, and thus contravene women's chastity, and it must be abandoned.

     
    Rafidi

    Rafidi

    Legendary Member
    @SeaAb
    Iranian women allowed to watch football at stadium for first time in decades
    • Women free to watch World Cup qualifier after ban lifts
    • Those attending in Tehran will be segregated from men
     
    Rafidi

    Rafidi

    Legendary Member
    @Lebmonage
    Going by the above, yes, it is an election. The very reason why she should vote is because some bans have been lifted after some campaigns. You change the laws by voting for representatives who share your views. If you have a majority to support a motion, then it will yield the results you want.
     
    proIsrael-nonIsraeli

    proIsrael-nonIsraeli

    Legendary Member
    Excellent reason to raze Dom of the Rock and Al Aqsa and re-build Third Temple.

    "Iranian leaders called for the tombs to be razed and replaced with a “Palestinian consulate” in revenge for Trump’s preferential treatment to the Israelis."

     
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