Living under Iran Mullahs

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  • proIsrael-nonIsraeli

    proIsrael-nonIsraeli

    Legendary Member
    "Iranian vice president contracts coronavirus"

    "One of Iran’s seven vice presidents has contracted the coronavirus, state news agency IRNA reported on Thursday"

     
    proIsrael-nonIsraeli

    proIsrael-nonIsraeli

    Legendary Member
    **** your Islamic regime. **** your mullahs.
    I admire the bravery of this woman. The thug will think twice next time before sticking his nose into other people's business.
    BTW, if police refuses to protect people, then perhaps people should take matters into their own hands, carefully, quietly, gently.
     
    Picasso

    Picasso

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    **** your Islamic regime. **** your mullahs.
    A bunch of bearded tyrants ruling Iran, their copies are ruling Lebanon nowadays, let's hope some Lebanese would wake up to realize what kind of a totalitarian model they are trying to import!

    The hypocrites, they tend to abuse and trade with women's bodies in secret, yet they preach and attack innocent women in public. Most probably, the vermin is a misogynist who went out to avenge his sick inner long decomposed self.

    Kudos to the brave lady who defended herself, and shame on those men who were afraid to hit the vermin for fear of his backers and contacts!

    Below is a documentary about this kind of culture that is ruling Iran, Iraq and is about to rule Lebanon!

     
    Ice Tea

    Ice Tea

    Active Member
    Iranian media reports nearly 300 people have been killed and more than 1,000 sickened so far by ingesting methanol across the Islamic Republic, where drinking alcohol is banned and where those who do rely on bootleggers.
    It comes as Tehran announced 144 new deaths from coronavirus on Friday, bringing its death toll to 2,378, and another 2,926 new confirmed cases, with a total of more than 32,300 infected.



     
    proIsrael-nonIsraeli

    proIsrael-nonIsraeli

    Legendary Member
    Iranian media reports nearly 300 people have been killed and more than 1,000 sickened so far by ingesting methanol across the Islamic Republic, where drinking alcohol is banned and where those who do rely on bootleggers.
    It comes as Tehran announced 144 new deaths from coronavirus on Friday, bringing its death toll to 2,378, and another 2,926 new confirmed cases, with a total of more than 32,300 infected.

    "ingesting methanol" - blindness if you are "lucky", renal failure and death if you are not.
     
    JeanH

    JeanH

    Well-Known Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    This is just pathetic :lol:

    this is an iranian secret top weapon, the light reflects of the seeling creating a shield, this shield is able to protect anyone inside its radius, the whole car could blow up and khumeini will still survive
     
    Picasso

    Picasso

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    With Inflation Ravaging Currency, Iran Is Changing Names and Numbers

    By Farnaz Fassihi



    The rial unit of currency, which has lost much of its value against the dollar, will be replaced by the toman, which the government says will be worth 10,000 rials.

    For many years, Iran’s government debated changing the national currency, the rial, by basically slashing four zeros off its face value — an acknowledgment of how American sanctions and economic mismanagement have contributed to inflation in the country.

    On Monday, the Iranian Parliament essentially took that step, authorizing the replacement of the rial with another basic unit of currency called the toman. Each toman will be worth 10,000 rials under the new system.

    The coronavirus pandemic, which turned Iran into a regional epicenter of the disease, appears to have played a decisive role, contributing to a further devaluation of the rial since February.

    Since 2018 when the Trump administration repudiated the nuclear agreement and reimposed sanctions on Iran, the value of Iran’s currency has fallen by roughly 60 percent.

    “Eliminating the four zeros is a necessary action to simplify financial transactions,” an Iran government spokesman, Ali Rabiei, said in a Twitter posting.

    The Guardian Council, a body of conservative clerics that supervises the Parliament, is expected to ratify the law, and then the Central Bank will have two years to implement the change — removing rials from circulation and issuing tomans instead.

    The change is the outcome of a draft bill presented in early 2019 by the governor of Iran’s central bank, Abdolnasser Hemati. He noted that the currency has been devalued 3,500 times since 1971 and that Iran had no choice but to “save the face” of its national currency, according to Iranian official media reports. Earlier attempts by President Hassan Rouhani’s government to change the currency as far back as 2016 had remained in limbo.

    Supporters of the change said slashing the extra zeros would vastly simplify financial calculations in Iran by eliminating the need for Iranian shoppers to carry loads of rials to make purchases, which they must do now because of inflation. On Monday the rial’s exchange rate was 156,000 to the dollar.

    But opponents argued that the plan was an added expense at a time when the government was already facing a budget deficit of between 30 to 50 percent for this coming fiscal year. The effect of the currency change, the critics said, amounted to just cosmetic window dressing.

    Fereydoun Khavand, an Iranian economist in Paris, said governments typically arrived at changing the national currency as the last stage of an economic overhaul like European countries had done after World War II or Turkey in recent years.

    Iran has done the opposite, Mr. Khavand said, partly because of the crippling effect of American sanctions, which have severely limited the country’s ability to sell oil or to conduct international financial transactions. Under those circumstances, he said other basic economic changes the Iranian government may want to undertake are difficult.

    “You typically fix the economy first and then change the currency,” said Mr. Khavand. “The government is in a financial bind with no prospect of financial aid coming from outside or from inside so they are trying this.”

    NYTimes
     
    Picasso

    Picasso

    Legendary Member
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