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Living under Iran Mullahs

Orangina

Legendary Member
Most Muslims dont live in Europe.
And every place and every people have their good and bad side. It doesnt mean if someone criticises the "bad side" or draws similarities that means I dont like Europe or I don't like European values. There is no hypocrisy here.

You should direct your reply to the guy on twitter who initiated the post. Tell him to leave others alone.

he is just feeling sorry for the Persian empire

I do too actually
 

Rafidi

Legendary Member
he is just feeling sorry for the Persian empire

I do too actually

Charity begins at home.
He should feel sorry for his own country. There are worse displays under the banner of freedom. He doesnt need to be more Shia than the Shia. That video is an exception.
 

Picasso

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
"العفو الدولية تدعو للتحقيق بشأن قمع متظاهرين في إيران... "نَحوزُ أدلة حول وفاة 304 أشخاص

دعت منظمة العفو الدولية الأمم المتحدة الأربعاء إلى إطلاق تحقيق بشأن مقتل مئات المتظاهرين على يد قوات الأمن الإيرانية خلال التجمعات التي حصلت في تشرين الثاني 2019 احتجاجا على إدراج زيادة في اسعار الوقود.

وبدأت التظاهرات في 15 تشرين الثاني بعد إعلان حكومي مفاجئ حول فرض زيادة كبيرة في أسعار المحروقات المدعومة عادة في البلاد. وسرعان ما اتخذت التظاهرات سياقا عنفيا وانقطع الانترنت في البلاد لنحو أسبوع.

ولم تعلن إيران حصيلة رسمية كما تعترف بوفاة إلا بضعة أشخاص، خاصة من بين القوى الأمنية، فيما صنّفت السلطات إحصاءات مغايرة بأنّها "محض كذب" صادر عن "جماعات معادية".

وأكدت منظمة العفو في تقرير أنّها تحوز أدلة حول وفاة 304 أشخاص، بينهم 10 نساء و23 طفلا، إبّان القمع "القاسي" للتظاهرات. وأضافت المنظمة غير الحكومية التي تتخذ من لندن مقراً لها أنّ 220 شخصا توفوا خلال يومين بحسب عمليات البحث والتحقيق التي أجرتها، مرتكزة بشكل خاص على الصور والفيديوهات.

ووفق منظمة العفو، فإنّ "الغالبية العظمى" قتلوا على يد قوات أمنية لجأت إلى استخدام القوة بصورة "غير مشروعة" نظراً إلى أنّ "أي دليل لم يثبت أنّ المتظاهرين كانوا يحوزون على أسلحة نارية أو كانوا يمثلون تهديداً وشيكاً". برغم ذلك، اشارت المنظمة إلى استثناء وحيد تمثل بتسجيل حالة إطلاق نار بين متظاهرين وقوات أمنية.

وقال فيليب لوثر، مدير البحوث للشرق الأوسط وشمال إفريقيا في منظمة العفو الدولية، "بعد ستة اشهر، لا تزال العائلات المنكوبة للضحايا تواصل كفاحها من أجل الحقيقة والعدالة، وهي تواجه الملاحقات الشديدة وأعمال التخويف من قبل السلطات"، وندد ب"الإفلات من العقاب" بالنسبة إلى القوات الأمنية.

وقال "بغياب" أي تحقيقات "من أجل المحاسبة على المستوى الوطني، نكرر دعوتنا إلى أعضاء مجلس حقوق الإنسان التابع إلى الأمم المتحدة لطلب تحقيق حول أعمال القتل هذه".

ووفق المنظمة غير الحكومية، فإنّ ثماني محافظات شهدت أعمال قتل، بما يعكس "طبيعة القمع واسعة النطاق".

وكانت ضواحي طهران الفقيرة الأكثر تضرراً بتسجيل 163 وفاة، تليها المحافظات التي تسكنها أقليات، خاصة خوزستان وكرمانشاه حيث سجلت على التوالي 57 و30 وفاة، بحسب منظمة العفو التي أوضحت أنّ الحصيلة قد تكون أعلى بكثير.

وأضافت المنظمة "باستثناء أربع حالات، فإنّ الضحايا قتلوا على يد القوات الأمنية (من بينها الحرس الثوري الإيراني، الباسيدج والشرطة) التي أطلقت الرصاص الحي، مستهدفة غالبا الرأس أو الصدر، ما يدل على أنّها كانت تطلق النار بهدف القتل".

وأعلنت منظمة العفو أنّها علمت "بحالات لضحايا آخرين أبلغ عنها ناشطون"، مشيرة إلى أنّها لا تزال "تفتقر إلى تفاصيل وافية وذات صدقية".

النهــــار
 

Picasso

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
Israel Hack of Iran Port Is Latest Salvo in Exchange of Cyberattacks

Israel was behind a cyberattack that disrupted a major port in Iran, done in response to an attempt by the Revolutionary Guards to infiltrate an Israeli water facility.

TEL AVIV — Israel was behind a cyberattack on May 9 that disrupted operations at a major port in Iran, according to high-ranking intelligence officials and experts in the Middle East who are kept informed of covert Israeli actions in the region.

The attack on the computer systems at the Shahid Rajaee port in the strategically important Strait of Hormuz was limited in scope, creating traffic jams of delivery trucks and some delays in shipments, but causing no substantial or lasting damage.

Israel and Iran have recently been engaged in an exchange of attempted and successful cyberattacks, and the purpose of Israel’s relatively small-scale effort at the port, according to intelligence officials, was to send a message to Tehran: Don’t target Israeli infrastructure.

The hacking of the port’s computers came in direct response, those experts familiar with the decision-making process said, to a failed Iranian cyberattack on an Israeli water facility last month.

Officials in Israel initially decided the country should not retaliate for the attack on the water system, according to the intelligence sources, because its effect would have been minor even if it had succeeded.

But when the story of the attempted attack was published in Israeli media, government officials, led by Naftali Bennett in his last days as defense minister, thought Israel should react in the same token by targeting Iranian civilian infrastructure and then leaking that story to international news media.

Israel’s responsibility for the cyberattack on the port was first reported by The Washington Post.

The incident that prompted the Israeli attack on the port happened on April 24, when a pump at a municipal water system in the Sharon region of central Israel stopped working. The facility’s computer system resumed pump operation in a short time but also recorded the occurrence as an exceptional event.

A security company that investigated discovered that malware had caused the shutdown. Because water is defined as “critical infrastructure” in Israel, the incident was reported to the Israel National Cyber Directorate and other intelligence agencies in Israel.

According to Israeli experts with knowledge of the investigation, Israeli officials identified the malware as coming from one of the offensive cyberunits of Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps.

While some unprotected pumps connected to the internet were not properly protected, the facility’s computer system identified the malfunction, restarted the pump, and no damage or interference with the water supply to residents and farmers in region was recorded.

The attack and its quality were described by intelligence official as “miserable.”

The main push for an Israeli counterresponse came from Mr. Bennett, the outgoing defense minister, who had advocated an assertive line against Iran in his seven months in office, both in actions and in his public statements.

“We must not let go of Iran for a moment,” Mr. Bennett said on Monday in his farewell remarks to the ministry as Israel swore in a new government. “We need to increase political, economic, military, technological pressure and do that in even more and bigger dimensions,” he said.

The site in Iran was specifically chosen as a non-central target, with an intent to send a warning that attacking Israel’s civilian infrastructure would not go unanswered and was crossing a red line, the intelligence officials said.

Activity at the Shahid Rajaee port has been severely hampered by the American sanctions imposed on Iran after the United States abandoned the nuclear deal. No more than 20 freight ships reach it every month.

Soon after the cyberattack began, the port’s authorities detected it. They failed to fix it immediately but switched to manual management of unloading and loading.

The restrained nature of the recent cyberattacks seem to indicate that both sides want to avoid escalation.

On the Israeli side, this is somewhat similar to the way that the country is waging war against Hezbollah in Lebanon and Syria, where it is careful to bomb and destroy equipment but only after verifying that there is no danger to Hezbollah’s personnel.

An intelligence official said that Israel hopes the attack on the port will end this cyber exchange, but that according to one intelligence assessment, the Revolutionary Guards will respond by attacking Israel again.

In a ceremony Tuesday evening, Gen. Aviv Kochavi, the chief of staff of the Israel Defense Forces, appeared to allude to the cyberattack on the Iranian port. “We will continue to use a diverse array of military tools and unique warfare methods to hurt the enemy,” he said.

While we do everything in our might to avoid harming civilians, the enemy makes every possible effort to harm civilians,” he said, adding, “The dozens of strikes that we have conducted, both recently and in the past, have already proved the superior nature of the intelligence and fire abilities of the I.D.F.”

NYTimes
 

proIsrael-nonIsraeli

Legendary Member
Israel Hack of Iran Port Is Latest Salvo in Exchange of Cyberattacks

Israel was behind a cyberattack that disrupted a major port in Iran, done in response to an attempt by the Revolutionary Guards to infiltrate an Israeli water facility.

TEL AVIV — Israel was behind a cyberattack on May 9 that disrupted operations at a major port in Iran, according to high-ranking intelligence officials and experts in the Middle East who are kept informed of covert Israeli actions in the region.

The attack on the computer systems at the Shahid Rajaee port in the strategically important Strait of Hormuz was limited in scope, creating traffic jams of delivery trucks and some delays in shipments, but causing no substantial or lasting damage.

Israel and Iran have recently been engaged in an exchange of attempted and successful cyberattacks, and the purpose of Israel’s relatively small-scale effort at the port, according to intelligence officials, was to send a message to Tehran: Don’t target Israeli infrastructure.

The hacking of the port’s computers came in direct response, those experts familiar with the decision-making process said, to a failed Iranian cyberattack on an Israeli water facility last month.

Officials in Israel initially decided the country should not retaliate for the attack on the water system, according to the intelligence sources, because its effect would have been minor even if it had succeeded.

But when the story of the attempted attack was published in Israeli media, government officials, led by Naftali Bennett in his last days as defense minister, thought Israel should react in the same token by targeting Iranian civilian infrastructure and then leaking that story to international news media.

Israel’s responsibility for the cyberattack on the port was first reported by The Washington Post.

The incident that prompted the Israeli attack on the port happened on April 24, when a pump at a municipal water system in the Sharon region of central Israel stopped working. The facility’s computer system resumed pump operation in a short time but also recorded the occurrence as an exceptional event.

A security company that investigated discovered that malware had caused the shutdown. Because water is defined as “critical infrastructure” in Israel, the incident was reported to the Israel National Cyber Directorate and other intelligence agencies in Israel.

According to Israeli experts with knowledge of the investigation, Israeli officials identified the malware as coming from one of the offensive cyberunits of Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps.

While some unprotected pumps connected to the internet were not properly protected, the facility’s computer system identified the malfunction, restarted the pump, and no damage or interference with the water supply to residents and farmers in region was recorded.

The attack and its quality were described by intelligence official as “miserable.”

The main push for an Israeli counterresponse came from Mr. Bennett, the outgoing defense minister, who had advocated an assertive line against Iran in his seven months in office, both in actions and in his public statements.

“We must not let go of Iran for a moment,” Mr. Bennett said on Monday in his farewell remarks to the ministry as Israel swore in a new government. “We need to increase political, economic, military, technological pressure and do that in even more and bigger dimensions,” he said.

The site in Iran was specifically chosen as a non-central target, with an intent to send a warning that attacking Israel’s civilian infrastructure would not go unanswered and was crossing a red line, the intelligence officials said.

Activity at the Shahid Rajaee port has been severely hampered by the American sanctions imposed on Iran after the United States abandoned the nuclear deal. No more than 20 freight ships reach it every month.

Soon after the cyberattack began, the port’s authorities detected it. They failed to fix it immediately but switched to manual management of unloading and loading.

The restrained nature of the recent cyberattacks seem to indicate that both sides want to avoid escalation.

On the Israeli side, this is somewhat similar to the way that the country is waging war against Hezbollah in Lebanon and Syria, where it is careful to bomb and destroy equipment but only after verifying that there is no danger to Hezbollah’s personnel.

An intelligence official said that Israel hopes the attack on the port will end this cyber exchange, but that according to one intelligence assessment, the Revolutionary Guards will respond by attacking Israel again.

In a ceremony Tuesday evening, Gen. Aviv Kochavi, the chief of staff of the Israel Defense Forces, appeared to allude to the cyberattack on the Iranian port. “We will continue to use a diverse array of military tools and unique warfare methods to hurt the enemy,” he said.

While we do everything in our might to avoid harming civilians, the enemy makes every possible effort to harm civilians,” he said, adding, “The dozens of strikes that we have conducted, both recently and in the past, have already proved the superior nature of the intelligence and fire abilities of the I.D.F.”


NYTimes

Israel: Anything you can do, I can do better.
. . . . . I can do anything better than you.
Iran: No you can't.
Israel: Yes, I can.
Iran: No, you can't.
Israel: Yes, I can.
Iran: No, you can't.
Israel: Yes, I can, Yes, I can!

And above is the proof, ladies and gentlemen.
 

Picasso

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
Virus Lockdown Forces Iran Into Its First Virtual Quds Day

Ayatollah Ali Khamenei openly acknowledged, apparently for the first time, Iran’s support for armed Palestinian groups fighting Israel.

For the past four decades, on the last Friday of Ramadan, supporters of Iran’s government have marched to denounce Israel. They burn Israel’s flag. They mock effigies of the leaders of Israel and of its patron, the United States. They chant pledges to liberate Jerusalem, or Quds, as the city is known in Arabic.

But the coronavirus pandemic forced Iran to cancel its annual Quds Day parade on Friday. Instead, Iran’s supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, delivered a televised speech, compensating in rhetoric for the silence in the streets.

Mr. Khamenei, reading from a prepared script, compared Israel to a “cancerous tumor in the region” that must be removed and to the coronavirus as “a reality that all wise people consider it mandatory to fight.”

Officials in Israel, the United States and the European Union condemned the comments as anti-Semitic and a cause for concern.

“The State of Israel faces great challenges in a variety of arenas,” Israel’s defense minister, Benny Gantz, posted on Facebook. “Khamenei’s statement that Israel is a ‘cancerous growth’ demonstrates that better than anything.”

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo wrote on Twitter that the comments were “disgusting and hateful anti-Semitic remarks” that did not represent the general view of Iranians. Mr. Pompeo also sharply criticized a cartoon from the office of Mr. Khamenei that was circulating on social media, saying the leader was “echoing Hitler’s call for genocide.”

The cartoon depicted Jerusalem with the flags of Iran and the Palestinian state flying above the golden Dome of the Rock, a revered religious site in Islam, and invoking the phrase “final solution” which is associated with the Nazi campaign to eradicate Jews.

Josep Borrell, the European Union’s foreign policy chief, called Mr. Khamenei’s comments “totally unacceptable” and said they “represent a deep source of concern.”

Mr. Khamenei denied that Iran’s stand toward Israel was anti-Semitic.

Since its inception in 1979, the Islamic Republic of Iran’s state policy has been to dispute Israel’s right to exist as an independent nation. It has funded, armed and cultivated close ties with armed Palestinian groups from the Palestine Liberation Organization and its former leader, Yasir Arafat, who died in 2004, to Hamas and Palestinian Islamic Jihad and their leaders.

In his speech on Friday, Mr. Khamenei openly acknowledged, apparently for the first time, that Iran supported armed Palestinian groups fighting the Jewish state.

A common thread in Friday’s speeches, from Iran to Lebanon to Gaza, highlighted the importance of the most significant Iranian general, Maj. Gen. Qassim Suleimani, to the regional battle to defeat Israel. General Suleimani was commander of the Quds Force until he was killed in a U.S. airstrike in Baghdad in January.

The general’s official Twitter account released a video of Ziyad al-Nakhalah, the chief of Palestinian Islamic Jihad, in which he revealed that General Suleimani personally organized and supervised the delivery of weapons to the Gaza Strip. He said the general had traveled to several countries to secure the weapons for delivery to Palestinians.

Iran also organized an online Quds Day event through a website where participants waved flags of Palestine, held photos of General Suleimani and donned kaffiyehs, the checkered head scarf that is the hallmark of Palestinian fighters.

Although bashing Israel is state policy in Iran, many ordinary Iranians don’t participate in the annual Quds rally and reject the government’s call to eradicate Israel from the region. On some occasions, through art and music, Iranians and Israeli people have shared messages of tolerance and peace with one another.

The Israeli pop diva Rita, for example, is popular and admired in Iran especially after she released an album in which she sings old Persian tunes in Farsi.

Quds Day fell this year on the same calendar day as the birth in 1997 of Iran’s reformist movement known by its date, “Dovom Khordad.”

Mehrnoosh Dozham, a doctoral student in Persian literature, tweeted that for some Iranians, Friday marked Quds Day and for others, Reformist Day. “But for me, today symbolizes the failure of all the Islamic Republic’s rhetorics.”


NYTimes
 

SeaAb

Legendary Member
Staff member
Super Penguin
THREAD.

Note: Iranian Riyal was 37,000 per $ when in 2013 when Rouhani was elected. Today it's 219,000 per $.
 

latinorange

Well-Known Member
95% news about Iran on both msm and crappym are fake or adulterated. So all the crap some of you are posting is just propaganda.

I have been lucky to have visited Iran countless times due to work. I have studied its history, talked to its people and worked with them. I have accompanied lots of europeans and have witnessed in first person the change they experience, before and after the trip. I have accompanied people who were reluctant to travel, and considered Iran a shithole were women are stoned and clerics are watching every move. These were not pathetic lebanese, lost in the world, with a deep identity crisis and full of prejudices. They were sophisticated and educated europeans with a clear feeling of superiority, in their view earned and well deserved. The kind of people who think they hold absolute truth and morally superior. The second day in Iran, they had to shut up and and went back home with the tails between their legs. All they found in Iran was people willing to talk to them, to share their food with them and open their homes to them. They found history and culture in every single town, small or big, the cradle of civilization. The heritage, whether persian, turk or mongol, preserved and well taken care of. They found a humble country where, despite brutal sanctions, people have all basic needs covered. People would tell me, "wow...iranians are so clean...men are well shaved and you hardly notice body smell despite the heat"...(this comment is typically european and gives a sense of the kind of people i deal with). I saw them walk scared into the most sacred shrines in the most conservative cities and clerics would just approach them to say hello and welcome them. They talked to iranians and found some who are not happy with certain government policies and who could openly talk and criticize the government. These same people would tell them "yeah we want more freedom, but we don't want to bow down to america or the west. We want to be independent and do what is best for Iran. And we will definitely not start a civil war just because the americans want us to". Iran is not a superpower, no matter the gov propaganda. It has been subject to brutal sanctions since decades ago. But it is strong as steel and it is only because of its people. Iranians are descendants of a great empire and it is clear when you meet them. Nothing to do with arabs, whose origin is in the desert.

I always say that the middle east has always been occupied by a regional or international power (persians, arabs, turks and now the west and the USA)...countries and nations making up the ME will never be fully independent and will always have to accept being ruled. If that is the case, i rather be ruled by iranians a thousand times before turks, arabs or jews.
 

Rafidi

Legendary Member
@Rafidi Do you agree with me that this Islamic regime byeswa sermeye?

“My client was arrested in 2018 or 2017,” Mr. Habibi said. He was convicted of drinking alcohol for the sixth time. Of course, there was also the issue of driving without a license and keeping alcohol. “

Article 179 of Iran’s Penal Code provides for a mandatory death sentence following the third conviction for drinking alcohol.
 

SeaAb

Legendary Member
Staff member
Super Penguin
“My client was arrested in 2018 or 2017,” Mr. Habibi said. He was convicted of drinking alcohol for the sixth time. Of course, there was also the issue of driving without a license and keeping alcohol. “

Article 179 of Iran’s Penal Code provides for a mandatory death sentence following the third conviction for drinking alcohol.
2ataloo ya zalame. :lol:
 

Rafidi

Legendary Member
2ataloo ya zalame. :lol:

I know. I think the guy, impliedly, committed suicide.

He knew the laws of his country. If you dont like the laws of your country and you cant change them, the only option would be to leave. I would have supported him if he wanted to leave or had left his country to a country where he can live a lifestyle that suits him. Basically, when the act becomes repeated, and likely public, then it is viewed by the authorities or understood by them to be subversion. If he wasnt caught and he was doing it in his house, no one would have noticed it. For 6 times, he was convicted. Likely, his political views may have been investigated as well, and could have been found to be anti govt or "anti regime".

Even if I or you may not agree with the law itself, it is an execution of the law in place. It may not be just or justice but his execution was legal and lawful. We can argue against the law itself and not against the sentence in this case. Normally, a lawyer can argue against the law or against the application of the law or even its interpretation. In this case, it isnt the application but the law itself that we may disagree with. And in this case, the guy knew the penalty and carried on doing what he was discouraged by law to do. Mind you, the Quran doesnt stipulate death after three or six or a million convictions for drinking alcohol. What is applied here is Iranian law to discourage an anti Islamic lifestyle or habit. And we can argue against the penal code and we can still be completely Muslims. I do not agree with killing anyone for drinking alcohol. They could have sentenced him to life imprisonment with the option of possible parole based on improved behavior/attitude.

Imagine if someone waved a Hezballah flag outside the White House, after knowing well that Hezballah is listed as a terror group by the US. And this person did it more than three times. And he would end up punished, even though he likely wont be killed. So similarly, here, I have a problem with the fact that the law is very harsh in Iran and not with its application.

It is a sorry case and sadly he has kids who'd grow up to not know their dad. But caution and sense of responsibility should not be thrown out of the window when it comes to such issues.
 
Last edited:

The_FPMer

Active Member
95% news about Iran on both msm and crappym are fake or adulterated. So all the crap some of you are posting is just propaganda.

I have been lucky to have visited Iran countless times due to work. I have studied its history, talked to its people and worked with them. I have accompanied lots of europeans and have witnessed in first person the change they experience, before and after the trip. I have accompanied people who were reluctant to travel, and considered Iran a shithole were women are stoned and clerics are watching every move. These were not pathetic lebanese, lost in the world, with a deep identity crisis and full of prejudices. They were sophisticated and educated europeans with a clear feeling of superiority, in their view earned and well deserved. The kind of people who think they hold absolute truth and morally superior. The second day in Iran, they had to shut up and and went back home with the tails between their legs. All they found in Iran was people willing to talk to them, to share their food with them and open their homes to them. They found history and culture in every single town, small or big, the cradle of civilization. The heritage, whether persian, turk or mongol, preserved and well taken care of. They found a humble country where, despite brutal sanctions, people have all basic needs covered. People would tell me, "wow...iranians are so clean...men are well shaved and you hardly notice body smell despite the heat"...(this comment is typically european and gives a sense of the kind of people i deal with). I saw them walk scared into the most sacred shrines in the most conservative cities and clerics would just approach them to say hello and welcome them. They talked to iranians and found some who are not happy with certain government policies and who could openly talk and criticize the government. These same people would tell them "yeah we want more freedom, but we don't want to bow down to america or the west. We want to be independent and do what is best for Iran. And we will definitely not start a civil war just because the americans want us to". Iran is not a superpower, no matter the gov propaganda. It has been subject to brutal sanctions since decades ago. But it is strong as steel and it is only because of its people. Iranians are descendants of a great empire and it is clear when you meet them. Nothing to do with arabs, whose origin is in the desert.

I always say that the middle east has always been occupied by a regional or international power (persians, arabs, turks and now the west and the USA)...countries and nations making up the ME will never be fully independent and will always have to accept being ruled. If that is the case, i rather be ruled by iranians a thousand times before turks, arabs or jews.
Well of course, Iranians are Indo-Europeans. But that has nothing to do with the foreign policy of their theocratic regime.
 
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