Living under Iran Mullahs

agnostic

Legendary Member
Shefto keef ya Aouniyes

This landing by Alloushe pilot should be a lesson of patience and Bassira on doing the right things instead of doing nothing to avoid going down to hell, confining yourselves to repeat like a parrot "Ma Khalluna"
 

SeaAb

Legendary Member
Staff member
Super Penguin
Shefto keef ya Aouniyes

This landing by Alloushe pilot should be a lesson of patience and Bassira on doing the right things instead of doing nothing to avoid going down to hell, confining yourselves to repeat like a parrot "Ma Khalluna"
giphy.gif
 

Picasso

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter

Iran’s Hollow Victory

The High Price of Regional Dominance

March/April 2022

Few countries have maintained clearer or more consistent aspirations over the last four decades than the Islamic Republic of Iran. Since 1979, when Islamic revolutionaries transformed the country from an U.S.-allied monarchy into an ardently anti-American theocracy, Iran has sought to expel the United States from the Middle East, replace Israel with Palestine, and remake the region in its image. Unlike U.S. strategy toward Iran and the greater Middle East, which has shifted markedly with different administrations, Iranian strategy toward the United States and the Middle East has exhibited remarkable continuity. Tehran has not achieved any of its lofty ambitions, but it has made progress toward them—and it is feeling emboldened by its recent successes.

Over the last two decades, Iran has established primacy in Iraq, Lebanon, Syria, and Yemen, the four failed or failing states that constitute what Iranian officials call their “axis of resistance.” It has done so by successfully cultivating regional militias, such as Hezbollah in Lebanon and the Houthis in Yemen, and by exploiting the power vacuums left by the U.S. invasion of Iraq in 2003 and the Arab uprisings of 2010–11. Neither the United States nor Iran’s regional rivals have demonstrated the will or the capacity to challenge Tehran’s foothold in these countries.

Iran has also exacerbated numerous other U.S. national security challenges, including nuclear proliferation, cyberwarfare, terrorism, energy insecurity, and the conflicts in Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria, and Yemen and that between the Israelis and the Palestinians. Although Tehran and Washington have faced numerous shared threats since 1979—including the Soviet Union, Iraq under Saddam Hussein, al Qaeda, the Taliban, and the Islamic State (or ISIS)—U.S. attempts to induce or pressure Iran to shift course have repeatedly failed. The Islamic Republic has proved too rigid to bend and too ruthless to break.

More...
 
Top