News Living under Iran's Mullahs

joseph_lubnan

Legendary Member
#1
Iran issues list of approved Muslim hairstyles for men
By MICHAEL THEODOULOU FOR MAILONLINE

Iran is set to order a crackdown on men sporting 'un-Islamic' haircuts.

Long hair and ponytails are definitely out this summer - though a dab of gel is acceptable, according to the country's morality police.

And a beard is no longer required as a symbol of political and religious correctness.


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Short back and sides: An Iranian man gets a haircut at an official hairdressing show as the Islamic republic prepares for the 'Modesty and Veil Festival'

A photographic catalogue of permissible 'Islamic' hairstyles is to be published and promoted later this month at the 'Modesty and Veil Festival'.

Iran’s dour Ministry of Culture and Islamic Guidance has given the project its vital seal of approval.

'The proposed styles are inspired by Iranians’ complexion, culture, religion and Islamic law,' said Jaleh Khodayar, the festival’s female organiser.

A tantalising foretaste of what is folically acceptable was provided by Iranian news agencies yesterday, which carried pictures of mostly clean-shaven male models sporting short hair.

Hardliners have frequently raged against youths with 'decadent Western cuts'.

But the red lines governing male grooming have never been clearly identified – until now.

Those aping the elaborate styles of some millionaire European football stars have been hauled off to police stations where their beloved locks have been unceremoniously and inexpertly shorn.

First-time offenders braving a close shave with the law get off with an unflattering short-back-and-sides.

But serial hair delinquents risk stiff fines, while barber shops catering to Western fashions have been shut.


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Fashion rules: An Iranian official shows pictures of hairstyles authorised by the Ministry of Guidance at an official hairdressing show in the capital Tehran

Dictating public behaviour and enforcing the strict dress code – especially for women – have long been a way for the regime to demonstrate its control.

But it has been an uphill struggle for an anti-Western regime dealing with a population seduced by Western pop culture.

The dress code crackdown is always beefed up at the beginning of summer when temperatures soar and people wear cooler clothing.

The authorities scornfully brand as 'mannequins' women who flout the rules by thrusting back their obligatory headscarves, wearing a dash of make-up or flashing a bit of ankle.

This summer, for the first time, police were equipped with cameras to film 'immodestly-attired' women, with the footage to be used as irrefutable evidence in court.

But men have also been feeling the heat in this summer’s 'anti-vice' campaign.

Police have seized expensive foreign cars whose male drivers are deemed to be 'harassing women'.

To humiliate the car owners, state media have shown pictures of their vehicles lined up along Tehran streets festooned with placards proclaiming, 'Combating harassment of women'.

Also under hardline scrutiny this summer is the growing fashion in Tehran’s wealthier northern suburbs to keep dogs – which are considered 'unclean' under Islamic tradition – as pets.

A senior cleric issued a fatwa, or religious ruling, against the practice last month.

'Friendship with dogs is a blind imitation of the West,' thundered Grand Ayatollah Naser Makerem Shirazi. 'There are lots of people in the West who love their dogs more than their wives and children.'
 
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  • HannaTheCrusader

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    #3
    Well at least. They aren't so keen on teh beard
    That's an improvement

    The mullah can't Control the population. Farsis are too suave and progress oriented to be out down like the Arabs are cowed

    This will fail too

    But hey. They mullahs will try :).
     

    Muki

    Well-Known Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    #4
    Do they have an approved list of styles for male pubes?

    Should women use pads or tampons?

    You know, existential questions.
     
    #11
    @joseph_lubnan Dallak 7arkeesh !!! 7ateet HA bi Rassak !? :D:D:D
    I like to poke the unreasonable Iran, and HA weapons apologists in the forum :)

    My views on HA are simple. They need to be a political party only, they can advocate for whatever they want. I do not agree to their weapons, and I believe it is up to the Lebanese to convince them to give their weapons to the state voluntarily. I think mine is a very reasonable opinion.
     
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    Hameed

    Well-Known Member
    #12
    I like to poke the unreasonable Iran, and HA weapons apologists in the forum :)

    My views on HA are simple. They need to be a political party only, they can advocate for whatever they want. I do not agree to their weapons, and I believe it is up to the Lebanese to convince them to give their weapons to the state voluntarily. I think mine is a very reasonable opinion.
    it is already too late to ask them this, their position now is very critical
     

    HannaTheCrusader

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    #13
    akhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh

    وقفت السلطات الايرانية، أمس، ثمانية أشخاص على صلة بعالم الأزياء بتهمة «ترويج ثقافة معادية للإسلام»، بسبب نشرهم صور نساء غير محجبات على تطبيق «انستغرام»، كما تم اتخاذ إجراءات وإصدار تحذيرات بحق 21 شخصاً آخر، وفق ما أعلن رئيس محكمة جرائم الانترنت.
    وقال القاضي في المحكمة، جواد بابائي، للتلفزيون الرسمي: «لقد وجدنا أن 20 في المئة من شبكة انستغرام في ايران تهيمن عليها أوساط الموضة»، وأن 60 بالمئة من مستخدمي التطبيق الايرانيين يتابعون هذه الصفحات، نظراً لأن موقعي «فيسبوك» و«تويتر» محظوران في الجمهورية الإسلامية.
    وبحسب القاضي، فإن المعتقلين الثمانية «كانوا ينشرون محتوى غير أخلاقي وثقافة معادية للإسلام»، بما في ذلك صور لعارضات أزياء غير محجبات، معتبراً أن من واجب القضاء «التحرك ضد أولئك الذين يرتكبون هذه الجرائم بطريقة منظمة».
    ومنذ عامين، حددت عملية «العنكبوت 2» القضائية نحو 170 شخصاً يديرون صفحات على «انستغرام»، بينهم 59 يعملون في التصوير والماكياج، 58 من عارضات الأزياء و51 مدير دار أزياء، وفقاً لبيان رسمي.
     

    Mighty Goat

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    #15
    akhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh

    وقفت السلطات الايرانية، أمس، ثمانية أشخاص على صلة بعالم الأزياء بتهمة «ترويج ثقافة معادية للإسلام»، بسبب نشرهم صور نساء غير محجبات على تطبيق «انستغرام»، كما تم اتخاذ إجراءات وإصدار تحذيرات بحق 21 شخصاً آخر، وفق ما أعلن رئيس محكمة جرائم الانترنت.
    وقال القاضي في المحكمة، جواد بابائي، للتلفزيون الرسمي: «لقد وجدنا أن 20 في المئة من شبكة انستغرام في ايران تهيمن عليها أوساط الموضة»، وأن 60 بالمئة من مستخدمي التطبيق الايرانيين يتابعون هذه الصفحات، نظراً لأن موقعي «فيسبوك» و«تويتر» محظوران في الجمهورية الإسلامية.
    وبحسب القاضي، فإن المعتقلين الثمانية «كانوا ينشرون محتوى غير أخلاقي وثقافة معادية للإسلام»، بما في ذلك صور لعارضات أزياء غير محجبات، معتبراً أن من واجب القضاء «التحرك ضد أولئك الذين يرتكبون هذه الجرائم بطريقة منظمة».
    ومنذ عامين، حددت عملية «العنكبوت 2» القضائية نحو 170 شخصاً يديرون صفحات على «انستغرام»، بينهم 59 يعملون في التصوير والماكياج، 58 من عارضات الأزياء و51 مدير دار أزياء، وفقاً لبيان رسمي.
    We like Iran. It provides us with free weapons. It provide us with free training. It creates a Lebanese "Islamic" militancy. This is because we are Holy. We are the Holy Land.

    Iran hates Israel. They do not believe that Israel was the grandson of Abraham. They believe that Israel was a Zionist. He is not from the Holy Land.

    Then we have the bunch of converts to the Iranian religion. The first thing they do is hate the people of the Holy Land as they want the land without its people.
     
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    Mighty Goat

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    #17
    akhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh

    وقفت السلطات الايرانية، أمس، ثمانية أشخاص على صلة بعالم الأزياء بتهمة «ترويج ثقافة معادية للإسلام»، بسبب نشرهم صور نساء غير محجبات على تطبيق «انستغرام»، كما تم اتخاذ إجراءات وإصدار تحذيرات بحق 21 شخصاً آخر، وفق ما أعلن رئيس محكمة جرائم الانترنت.
    وقال القاضي في المحكمة، جواد بابائي، للتلفزيون الرسمي: «لقد وجدنا أن 20 في المئة من شبكة انستغرام في ايران تهيمن عليها أوساط الموضة»، وأن 60 بالمئة من مستخدمي التطبيق الايرانيين يتابعون هذه الصفحات، نظراً لأن موقعي «فيسبوك» و«تويتر» محظوران في الجمهورية الإسلامية.
    وبحسب القاضي، فإن المعتقلين الثمانية «كانوا ينشرون محتوى غير أخلاقي وثقافة معادية للإسلام»، بما في ذلك صور لعارضات أزياء غير محجبات، معتبراً أن من واجب القضاء «التحرك ضد أولئك الذين يرتكبون هذه الجرائم بطريقة منظمة».
    ومنذ عامين، حددت عملية «العنكبوت 2» القضائية نحو 170 شخصاً يديرون صفحات على «انستغرام»، بينهم 59 يعملون في التصوير والماكياج، 58 من عارضات الأزياء و51 مدير دار أزياء، وفقاً لبيان رسمي.
    Sexual repression is the most effective method to control and manipulate the population and distract such a population from the atrocities of their own regime.

    When one is sexually deprived, all one wants to do is satisfy this desire. This is where the energy and the mobilization are geared at.

    Saudi Arabia, Iran and most of the Gulf States govern and control their population by this simple method. Prohibition creating a physical desire that distracts the population from thinking about any other need but the satisfaction of sexual desires.
     
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    #19
    Iran's women problem: All of the things Iranian women aren't allowed - Telegraph

    [article]
    Iran's big woman problem: All of the things Iranian women aren't allowed to do

    Throughout their lives, Iranian women are forced to navigate a web of restrictions, imposed by law and custom. Every aspect of their existence – from how they must dress in public, to the subjects they can study at university and the jobs they are allowed to do in the workplace – is closely regulated.




    An example was highlighted last week, when a female football star in Iran was banned from travelling to an international tournament by her husband. He refused to sign papers allowing her to renew her passport, meaning she was unable to play in the Asian Cup.

    The system is not necessarily finished with a woman even after she dies. If death should come in the form of a tragic accident, then her family will receive only half the legal compensation that would be due for the loss of a man.



    Education
    But there is also good news. Unlike in Saudi Arabia, Iranian women are allowed to drive and to move with relative freedom. There are no restrictions on female primary or secondary education – and at university level, women now comprise the majority of students.

    However, certain universities ban female students from studying specific subjects, usually those concerning engineering and technology. In general terms, the trend has been towards imposing more restrictions and increasing the number of subjects that are closed to women, although the practise varies from one university to the next.



    Dress restrictions
    Meanwhile, women who venture outdoors must wear a headscarf, known as the “rusari”, and a long overcoat, known as the “manteau”; alternatively, they can wear a black cloak known as the “chador”. These are legal requirements, punishable by fines or imprisonment for repeat offenders.

    chador_holds_a_sma_3447416b.jpg
    A woman wearing a chador on the streets of Tehran

    How strictly the law is enforced depends on many factors. Partly, it is down to where you happen to live: in affluent north Tehran, women tend to push back their “rusaris” to reveal an abundance of hair. Their "manteaus" are multi-coloured and stylishly nipped in at the waist. In conservative rural Iran, however, drab black “chadors” are the norm.

    How women are allowed to dress also depends on which political faction happens to be in power. If hardliners are in the ascendancy, it might be wise to conceal every whisp of hair on the streets of Tehran; if reformers are in office, you might try wearing your rusari so far back as to render it almost invisible. The unspoken rules can change from month to month.



    Workplace life
    Women are generally accepted in the workplace in Iran - although, once again, there are restrictions. Under Article 1117 of the Civil Code, an Iranian man can ban his wife from working if he believes this would be “incompatible with the interests of the family or with his or his wife’s dignity”.

    The most striking element of this law is that a man can stop his wife from working if he thinks this would damage his own dignity.

    Fortunately, this seems to be rare: there is no doubt that Iranian women make up a considerable – and probably increasing – minority of the workforce.

    As in higher education, however, certain roles are closed to them. Over the summer, the Iranian Central Bank advertised various positions intended for university graduates. All of these adverts stated whether the job in question was open to men and women – or to men alone.

    Of the 47 vacancies, 36 were “men only” and 11 were available to both genders. The logic behind the distinction was unclear. For some reason, men and women can join the “statistics” section of the Central Bank – but the “accounting” department is men only.

    Women can apply for a post in the “administration of education” department, but not in “public administration”. A woman can be accepted by the “medical administration” section, yet only men are entrusted with “IT management”.



    Politics
    This erratic approach extends into the world of politics. Women are allowed to run for parliament and the 290-seat House currently has nine female members (a mere three per cent of the total). President Hassan Rouhani has made an important gesture by appointing a handful of female ministers: the most senior, Masoumeh Ebtekar, serves as one of Iran’s 12 vice-presidents.

    But every time a woman has tried to run for president, she has always been turned down by the Guardian Council, a powerful committee of old men which vets all candidates for public office.

    So Iranian women must contend with countless ceilings – some made of glass, and others of the very visible firmament of the law itself.


    [/article]
     
    #20
    https://www.hrw.org/world-report/20

    [Article]
    Iran

    Repressive elements within the security and intelligence forces, as well as the judiciary, retained wide powers and continued to be the main perpetrators of rights abuses. Executions, especially for drug-related offenses, increased sharply from previous years. Security and intelligence forces arrested journalists, bloggers, and social media activists, and revolutionary courts handed down heavy sentences against them.

    Death Penalty and Torture
    Authorities executed at least 830 prisoners by hanging as of November 1, 2015, with almost 700 executed in the first six months of the year. Officials also carried out amputations of limbs for crimes such as theft.

    Under Iranian law, many crimes are punishable by death, including some that do not involve violence, such as “insulting the Prophet,” apostasy, same-sex relations, adultery, and drug-related offenses. Convicted drug offenders sentenced after flawed trials in revolutionary courts formed the majority of prisoners executed in 2015.

    On August 1, a revolutionary court in Tehran sentenced Mohammad Ali Taheri, the leader of a new age spiritual and healing group, to death on the charge of “spreading corruption on earth.” The judiciary had previously sentenced him in 2011 to five years’ imprisonment, 74 lashes, and fines for the same activities. On December 20, a branch of the Supreme Court overturned Taheri’s death sentence, referring his case back to the revolutionary court for retrial.

    According to unofficial sources, at least four prisoners executed in 2015 may have been child offenders aged under 18 at the time of the murder and rape crimes for which they received death sentences. Dozens of child offenders reportedly remained on death row and at risk of execution, including Saman Naseem and Salar Shadizadi. Iranian law allows capital punishment for persons who have reached the official age of puberty: nine for girls, 15 for boys.

    Alleging ties to armed opposition groups, the revolutionary courts have also handed out death sentences on charges of moharebeh (“enmity against God”). Dozens of others sentenced on terrorism-related charges, including many Iranian Kurds and Baluch, were on death row following trials rife with due process violations. On March 4, prison authorities in Rajai Shahr Prison in Karaj hanged Hamed Ahmadi and five others. A revolutionary court had sentenced all six to death for moharebeh following unfair trials.

    On August 26, officials executed Behrouz Alkhani, an Iranian Kurd that a revolutionary court had convicted of moharebeh for his alleged involvement in the assassination of a prosecutor on behalf of the PJAK armed opposition group. The Supreme Court still had to rule on Alkhani’s appeal at the time of his execution.

    Freedom of Expression and Information
    Security authorities continued to clamp down on free speech and dissent, and revolutionary courts handed down harsh sentences against social media users, including death sentences in some cases. As of December, according to Reporters Without Borders, Iran held at least 50 journalists, bloggers, and social media activists in detention.

    In April, an appeals court in Tehran sentenced six social media users to five to seven years in prison for their Facebook posts on charges of “assembly and collusion against the national security” and “insulting the sanctities.” On July 13, 2014, a Tehran revolutionary court had previously sentenced eight Facebook users to a total of 127 years in prison for allegedly posting messages deemed to insult government officials and “religious sanctities,” among other crimes.

    On June 1, another revolutionary court sentenced Atena Farghadani to a total of 12 years and 9 months’ imprisonment in connection with a critical cartoon she drew and posted on her Facebook page in August 2014 that depicted members of Iran’s parliament as animals. The charges against Farghadani included “assembly and collusion against the state,” “propaganda against the state,” and insulting public officials. Although by law she should serve no more than seven-and-a-half years, the heaviest single sentence she received, the judiciary compounded her sentence.

    On June 8, authorities announced a wave of arrests of social media users and activists who “published illegal invitations on social networks ... [and] had anti-security tendencies.”

    On October 11, 2015, a judiciary spokesman announced Washington Post reporter Jason Rezaian's conviction. As of December, court authorities had refused to provide clarification about the specific charges for which he was convicted or the details of his sentence. The sentence came after unidentified agents arrested Rezaian, his wife Yeganeh Salehi—also a journalist—and two unnamed people—a photojournalist and her spouse—on July 22, 2014, and detained them without charge for months without allowing them access to a lawyer. Authorities released Salehi in September 2014.

    Authorities continued to block websites, including Facebook and Twitter, based on arbitrary and unlawful content-based criteria.

    Freedom of Assembly and Association
    Scores of people held for their affiliation with banned opposition parties, labor unions, and student groups were in prison. The judiciary targeted independent and unregistered trade unions, and security and intelligence forces continued to round up labor activists and leaders.

    Police arrested independent labor activist Reza Amjadi in the Kurdish-majority city of Sanandaj on April 25, Mahmoud Salehi and Osman Esmaili in Saqqez on April 28, and two members of the Union of Workers of the Tehran and Suburbs Bus Company, Ebrahim Maddadi and Davood Razavi, in their homes on April 29.

    On July 22, authorities arrested approximately 130 teachers who planned a demonstration in front of the parliament building in Tehran to protest the recent arrest of Esmaeil Abdi, the head of a teacher’s guild, who was arrested for his peaceful activities on June 27. They later released all the teachers without charge.

    Political Prisoners and Human Rights Defenders
    The authorities continued to imprison dozens of activists and human rights defenders, such as lawyers Mohammad Seifzadeh and Abdolfattah Soltani, on account of their peaceful or professional activities. Judiciary officials continued their efforts to further erode the independence of the Iranian Bar Association and restricted the right of criminal defendants to access a lawyer of their own choosing during the investigation phase of national security cases.

    On May 5, authorities arrested Narges Mohammadi, a member of the banned Center for Human Rights Defenders, reportedly because of her continued peaceful activism against the state. In 2010, a revolutionary court sentenced Mohammadi to six years in prison for her rights-related activities, but authorities released her due to a serious medical condition that she still suffers.

    On May 10, a revolutionary court informed Atena Daemi, a child and civil rights activist, that it had sentenced her to 14 years in prison on charges that included “assembly, collusion and propaganda against the state” and “insulting the Supreme Leader and religious sanctities” for her peaceful activism.

    On August 19, a court acquitted former Tehran Prosecutor Saeed Mortazavi of charges related to the torture and death of three protesters held at Kahrizak detention facility following their arrest during the 2009 post-election protests. Mortazavi has so far escaped criminal punishment despite allegations implicating him in a range of serious rights abuses during his time in public office.

    Prominent opposition figures Mir Hossein Mousavi, Zahra Rahnavard, and Mehdi Karroubi—held without charge or trial since February 2011—remained under house arrest.

    Women’s Rights
    In 2015, authorities sought to introduce or implement discriminatory laws, including restricting the employment of women in certain sectors and limiting access to family planning as part of official measures to boost Iran’s population. On April 22, the Guardian Council, an unelected body of 12 religious jurists, approved a controversial bill that empowers voluntary Basij paramilitary forces to “promote virtue and prevent vice,” including enforcement of the strict Islamic dress code, or hijab, for women. If passed, the bill would empower individuals to act outside of any official capacity and without any parameters for holding them legally accountable.

    In August, Iran’s judiciary prevented the release from prison of women’s rights activist Bahareh Hedayat although an appellate court had ordered it. A revolutionary court sentenced Hedayat to seven-and-a-half years in prison in January 2010 for her peaceful activism on charges of “acting against the national security” and insulting public officials.

    Iranian women face discrimination in many aspects of their lives, including personal status matters related to marriage, divorce, inheritance, and child custody. Authorities prevent girls and women from attending certain sporting events, including men’s soccer and volleyball matches.

    Regardless of her age, a woman cannot marry without the approval of her male guardian, and generally cannot pass on her Iranian nationality to a foreign-born spouse or to her children. Child marriage—though not the norm—continues, as the law allows girls to marry at 13 and boys at age 15, as well as at younger ages if authorized by a judge.

    Treatment of Minorities
    The government denies freedom of religion to Baha’is, Iran’s largest non-Muslim religious minority, and discriminates against them. At least 74 Baha’is were held in Iran’s prisons as of November 20, 2015. Security and intelligence forces also continued to target Christian converts from Islam, Persian-speaking Protestant and evangelical congregations, and members of the home church movement. Some faced charges such as “acting against the national security” and “propaganda against the state.”

    Authorities restrict political participation and public sector employment of non-Shia Muslim minorities, including Sunnis, who account for about 10 percent of the population. They also prevent Sunnis from constructing their own mosques in Tehran and conducting separate Eid prayers.

    On July 29, municipal employees destroyed a Sunni prayer hall located in the Pounak district of Tehran that they alleged was functioning without the required permits. The government continued to target members of Sufi mystical orders, particularly members of the Nematollahi Gonabadi order.

    The government restricted cultural as well as political activities among the country’s Azeri, Kurdish, Arab, and Baluch minorities. In April, police and security agents rounded up and detained scores of Ahwazi Arabs, including several children, in Khuzestan province. In July, the University of Kurdistan announced it had opened a new department of Kurdish language and literature studies that would accept students for the 2015-16 academic year.

    Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity
    Same-sex conduct between men in Iran is punishable by flogging or the death penalty. Same-sex conduct between women is punishable by flogging. Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people are subjected to official harassment, arbitrary arrest and detention, prosecution, and ill-treatment or torture. Although Iran permits and subsidizes sex reassignment surgery for transgender people, no law prohibits discrimination against them.

    Refugees
    Afghan refugees and migrant workers, estimated at between 2.5 and 3 million in number, continued to face serious abuses. Authorities reportedly allowed Afghan children, including undocumented ones, to register for schools after Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei issued a ruling reaffirming the need for universal education.

    However, Afghans continue to face barriers to receiving other forms of social services; are at higher risk for arbitrarily being stopped, questioned, and/or detained by authorities; and have little recourse when abused by government or private actors.

    Key International Actors
    On July 14, the United Nations Security Council’s five permanent members, along with Germany and Iran, announced that they had reached a comprehensive agreement to monitor Iran’s nuclear program. The deal paves the way for gradually removing financial and economic sanctions against Iran. On July 28, during EU Foreign Affairs Chief Mogherini’s visit to Tehran, Iran’s foreign minister said Iran and the European Union had agreed to hold talks “over different issues, including … human rights.”

    The government continued to block access to Iran by the UN special rapporteur on the human rights situation in Iran, Ahmed Shaheed, and other UN rights experts.

    [/article]
     

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