Making History Trump the Crusader in Chief Historical 4 th July, no more a party but a national event

Is The Crusader in Chief 4 th July

  • Historical

    Votes: 1 100.0%
  • Not Historical

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Celebrate the Armed Forces and the spirit of the nation for the first time in US History

    Votes: 1 100.0%
  • Make the Fourth of July a truly national event

    Votes: 1 100.0%
  • An occasion to talk about Security and Borders

    Votes: 1 100.0%
  • Something bad like autocratic nations

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • A place to give the best places to donors

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Corruption

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    1
CrusaderV

CrusaderV

Well-Known Member
Orange Room Supporter
Trump focuses July 4 speech on celebrating armed forces
BY MAGGIE MILLER AND BRETT SAMUELSTWEET SHARE MORE

President Trump on Thursday delivered a speech heavy on military imagery and light on political rhetoric during his "Salute to America" event to mark Independence Day, capping off weeks of controversy with a largely uncontroversial appearance.
The president spoke for 45 minutes during which he strongly praised and highlighted U.S. armed forces. He was flanked by supporters and Pentagon officials, and the speech was highlighted by multiple flyovers involving military aircraft.
"That same American spirit that emboldened our founders has kept us strong throughout our history," Trump said. "To this day that spirit runs through the veins of every American patriot. It lives on in each and every one of you here today.
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"It is the spirit, daring and defiance, excellence and adventure, courage and confidence, loyalty and love that built this country into the most exceptional nation in the history of the world, and our nation is stronger today than it ever was before. it is its strongest now."
With the Blue Angels flying above him and military tanks standing near the National Mall, the event was intended to fulfill Trump’s desire for a military celebration similar to the one he enjoyed during a 2017 trip to Paris for Bastille Day.
The military overtones had been criticized by Democrats and officials in Washington, D.C., who felt it was inappropriate for the Fourth of July. D.C. leaders have also raised concerns about the cost of the event and potential damage to local infrastructure from military hardware.
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The day before the speech, it was revealed that the National Park Service (NPS), which has jurisdiction over the National Mall, had redirected $2.5 million from its overall budget to help pay for the Salute to America event. The full cost will exceed that when factoring in the cost of military equipment and security.
Trump steered away from political rhetoric in his speech, however, and did not address the controversy over the event, which he was heavily involved in planning.
"The future of American freedom rests on the shoulders of men and women willing to defend it," Trump said in front of the Lincoln Memorial. "Now is the chance to join our military and make a truly great statement in life, and you should do it."
Trump's pitch for joining one of the branches of the armed forces came after he said that "today, we come together as one nation with this very special salute to America. We celebrate our history, our people and the heroes who proudly defend our flag — the brave men and women of the United States military!"
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Trump also praised law enforcement, and the closest he came to current politics was highlighting Immigration and Customs Enforcement and other border patrol groups that have seen public criticism mount over the treatment of immigrants at the southern border and the administration's hard-line immigration policies.
Both pro- and anti-Trump activists had packed the National Mall for hours before the speech, with the group Code Pink bringing both a large "Baby Trump" balloon and a large statue meant to depict Trump tweeting on the toilet.
Two protesters were arrested and two U.S. Secret Service agents received minor injuries in a flag-burning incident outside the White House that led to a brief scuffle between groups.
Thousands of people ultimately filled in the mall from the Lincoln Memorial to the Washington Monument, many of them supportive of the president's remarks. A "USA!" chant broke out as he stepped to the microphone, and a few supporters called out "four more years" as he exited.
White House officials feared in the days leading up to the event that inclement weather and late-developing logistics could cap attendance, presenting a problem for a president obsessed with crowd size.
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Ultimately, Trump appeared pleased with the final result:
A great crowd of tremendous Patriots this evening, all the way back to the Washington Monument! #SaluteToAmericapic.twitter.com/nJghdfqIhX
— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) July 5, 2019
Trump also touted the creation of a new Space Force in his speech, and promised that the U.S. would soon return to the moon, as well as put a man on Mars for the first time.
"Someday soon we will plant the American flag on Mars, it's happening," Trump said.
The strength of the American spirit was a recurring theme of the rainy evening address.
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"Loyalty and love built this country into the most exceptional nation in the history of the world," Trump said, adding that the U.S. "is at its strongest now."
Trump emphasized the unity of Americans, saying that "as we gather this evening in the joy of freedom, we remember that we all share a truly extraordinary heritage. Together, we are part of one of the greatest stories ever told — the story of America."
 
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  • CrusaderV

    CrusaderV

    Well-Known Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Tanks display
    Planes
    The Crusader in Chief
    Crusader ??
     
    CrusaderV

    CrusaderV

    Well-Known Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Historical event by an Historical Leader
    Who should be allowed to be elected for ever
    The idea of 2 terms limit is stupid
    We need at least 4 terms
     
    CrusaderV

    CrusaderV

    Well-Known Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    I hear you brother!!


    :woot:
    You mean the Red Planet where the Crusader Flag will be put soon
    Fly off to Mars at Kennedy Space Center’s Astronaut Training Experience
    By Dave Parfitt | Fox News
    NASA successfully tests the Orion spacecraft's launch abort systemVideo
    NASA successfully tests the Orion spacecraft's launch abort system
    Raw video: NASA performs key test in preparation for future manned-missions to the moon with a successful test of the Orion spacecraft's launch abort system from the Space Launch Complex 46 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.
    As we celebrate the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11, the first manned mission to land on the Moon, Florida’s Kennedy Space Center has opened up its Astronaut Training Experience to the public.
    For anyone with childhood dreams of going to space, this high-tech, interactive exhibit at America’s spaceport gives a glimpse of what it takes to train like an astronaut. Kennedy Space Center recently asked if we had the “right stuff” to get through the Astronaut Training Experience (ATX). Continue reading for a first-hand account of this stellar experience.

    ATX
    Entrance to the Astronaut Training Experience at Kennedy Space Center. (photo by Dave Parfitt)

    Entrance to the Astronaut Training Experience at Kennedy Space Center. (photo by Dave Parfitt)
    ATX is not a leisurely vacation experience. Arrival at Kennedy Space Center was set promptly at 0800 hours, and recruits on this morning came from all over the world. We met families visiting from Chile, Poland, Russia, and … Florida. The quartermaster quickly distributed required gear (ATX t-shirt), and we gathered for coffee and snacks in the mess hall to get to know other members of our team. First assignment? Head to the launch control center.

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER
    Eyes towards the heavens at Kennedy Space Center. (Photo by Dave Parfitt)

    Eyes towards the heavens at Kennedy Space Center. (Photo by Dave Parfitt)
    Half of the team made up Mission Control, and the other half formed the Capsule Crew. We were assigned to the capsule crew: my 17 -year old daughter, Commander; myself, Flight Engineer. Strap in, the countdown was on – 3… 2… 1… liftoff. Mission Control jettisoned us off to Mars. Our capsule shimmied and shook off the launch pad and lurched during rocket separation. Each person had specific roles to fulfill in order to dock with the International Space Station, and success was certainly not guaranteed. Fortunately, our Capsule Crew worked in concert with Mission Control to reach the space station where we “rested” prior to the long-distance flight to Mars.
    APOLLO 11'S MICHAEL COLLINS REFLECTS ON HISTORIC MOON LANDING: 'WE WERE JUST REGULAR ASTRONAUTS'
    COMMANDER
    “Ladies and gentlemen, your 17-year-old flight commander.” (Photo by Dave Parfitt)

    “Ladies and gentlemen, your 17-year-old flight commander.” (Photo by Dave Parfitt)
    After the mission launch simulation, it was time for a series of exercises to prepare for duties in space and on Mars. These high-tech exercises utilized the same NASA equipment as astronaut trainees and guests could compare progress with NASA interns as well as Hall Of Fame astronauts.
    We learned a large part of any astronaut training was team collaboration. During microgravity spacewalk training, one person sat in the microgravity chair, another directed them remotely through a headset, and the third handed tools to the spacewalker. After completion, the group rotated so everyone experienced each part of the exercise. The microgravity chair floated over the ground like a puck on an air hockey table, and the astronaut recruit maneuvered under a truss fixing various components without “floating off into space.” My daughter and I were teamed with a competitive woman from New York City, and we whizzed through the exercise faster than any of the other recruits. She was determined to demonstrate to her husband that she was the more qualified astronaut trainee.
    MICROGRAVITY
    Microgravity space walk during the astronaut training experience at Kennedy Space Center. (Photo by Dave Parfitt)

    Microgravity "space walk" during the astronaut training experience at Kennedy Space Center. (Photo by Dave Parfitt)
    Next, time for a stroll on the surface of Mars. One team member strapped on a sophisticated virtual reality headset grabbed two handheld controllers, and was guided remotely through a task on “Mars.” The experience was so immersive, you couldn’t help but react and jump to what was happening around you. Rocks moved, doors opened, and dust storms blinded you – if NASA could have somehow changed our weight perception, we certainly would have believed we were walking on the face of the Red Planet.
    SPACE WALK
    Virtual Reality walk on Mars during the astronaut training experience at Kennedy Space Center. (Photo by Dave Parfitt)

    Virtual Reality walk on Mars during the astronaut training experience at Kennedy Space Center. (Photo by Dave Parfitt)
    Our final station was the Mars Lander/Rover simulator. “Easy or hard?” The instructor asked. “You flip upside down 4-5 times on the hard setting,” she said. Without hesitation, my daughter exclaimed “HARD!” We were tasked with landing on the surface of Mars and then driving in the Rover to Mars Base 1. We came in hard on the landing and tumbled like a wind-blown grocery bag across the surface, and the simulator shared every bump and roll. The Rover driving didn’t fare much better as we ended up with a shattered windshield. All-and-all, not the best showing of our three training stations.
    WATCH NASA LAUNCH ITS ORION MOON CAPSULE ATOP A MISSILE IN SPECTACULAR SAFETY TEST
    Following the individual training exercises, all recruits gathered for a de-briefing and informational session about the International Space Station. All guides and instructors were incredibly knowledgeable and passionate about space, and gladly answered all of our questions. It was a highly educational experience filled with realistic science and engineering applications that seamlessly blended virtual reality with physical experiences.
    NASA SIMULATOR
    One of the two, 2-person Mars Lander/Rover simulators at Kennedy Space Center’s astronaut training experience. (Photo by Dave Parfitt)

    One of the two, 2-person Mars Lander/Rover simulators at Kennedy Space Center’s astronaut training experience. (Photo by Dave Parfitt)
    Following our rigorous day of training, we ate, drank, and relaxed just like those original astronauts during the space race. We headed to the Tiki Bar at the venerable Cocoa Beach Pier (built in 1962) that offered views of those historic Apollo launches 50 years ago.
    CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP
    COCOA BEACH PIER
    Drinks and sunset at Cocoa Beach Pier following a long day of astronaut training. (Photo by Dave Parfitt)

    Drinks and sunset at Cocoa Beach Pier following a long day of astronaut training. (Photo by Dave Parfitt)
    The Astronaut Training Experience is located within the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, but costs separate from regular admission and tour prices. The 5-hour Astronaut Training Program is only offered on select days and costs $175/person. The minimum age is 10 years old, and those 10-17 require a paying, participating adult to accompany them. You do not need to purchase admission to Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex for this experience. It’s a great half-day activity especially for those that have already toured Kennedy Space Center or have a limited time on a cruise docked at Port Canaveral.
     
    CrusaderV

    CrusaderV

    Well-Known Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    The Crusader in Chief Mars Crusader Conquest
    Fly off to Mars at Kennedy Space Center’s Astronaut Training Experience
    By Dave Parfitt | Fox News
    NASA successfully tests the Orion spacecraft's launch abort systemVideo
    NASA successfully tests the Orion spacecraft's launch abort system
    Raw video: NASA performs key test in preparation for future manned-missions to the moon with a successful test of the Orion spacecraft's launch abort system from the Space Launch Complex 46 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.
    As we celebrate the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11, the first manned mission to land on the Moon, Florida’s Kennedy Space Center has opened up its Astronaut Training Experience to the public.
    For anyone with childhood dreams of going to space, this high-tech, interactive exhibit at America’s spaceport gives a glimpse of what it takes to train like an astronaut. Kennedy Space Center recently asked if we had the “right stuff” to get through the Astronaut Training Experience (ATX). Continue reading for a first-hand account of this stellar experience.

    ATX
    Entrance to the Astronaut Training Experience at Kennedy Space Center. (photo by Dave Parfitt)

    Entrance to the Astronaut Training Experience at Kennedy Space Center. (photo by Dave Parfitt)
    ATX is not a leisurely vacation experience. Arrival at Kennedy Space Center was set promptly at 0800 hours, and recruits on this morning came from all over the world. We met families visiting from Chile, Poland, Russia, and … Florida. The quartermaster quickly distributed required gear (ATX t-shirt), and we gathered for coffee and snacks in the mess hall to get to know other members of our team. First assignment? Head to the launch control center.

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER
    Eyes towards the heavens at Kennedy Space Center. (Photo by Dave Parfitt)

    Eyes towards the heavens at Kennedy Space Center. (Photo by Dave Parfitt)
    Half of the team made up Mission Control, and the other half formed the Capsule Crew. We were assigned to the capsule crew: my 17 -year old daughter, Commander; myself, Flight Engineer. Strap in, the countdown was on – 3… 2… 1… liftoff. Mission Control jettisoned us off to Mars. Our capsule shimmied and shook off the launch pad and lurched during rocket separation. Each person had specific roles to fulfill in order to dock with the International Space Station, and success was certainly not guaranteed. Fortunately, our Capsule Crew worked in concert with Mission Control to reach the space station where we “rested” prior to the long-distance flight to Mars.
    APOLLO 11'S MICHAEL COLLINS REFLECTS ON HISTORIC MOON LANDING: 'WE WERE JUST REGULAR ASTRONAUTS'
    COMMANDER
    “Ladies and gentlemen, your 17-year-old flight commander.” (Photo by Dave Parfitt)

    “Ladies and gentlemen, your 17-year-old flight commander.” (Photo by Dave Parfitt)
    After the mission launch simulation, it was time for a series of exercises to prepare for duties in space and on Mars. These high-tech exercises utilized the same NASA equipment as astronaut trainees and guests could compare progress with NASA interns as well as Hall Of Fame astronauts.
    We learned a large part of any astronaut training was team collaboration. During microgravity spacewalk training, one person sat in the microgravity chair, another directed them remotely through a headset, and the third handed tools to the spacewalker. After completion, the group rotated so everyone experienced each part of the exercise. The microgravity chair floated over the ground like a puck on an air hockey table, and the astronaut recruit maneuvered under a truss fixing various components without “floating off into space.” My daughter and I were teamed with a competitive woman from New York City, and we whizzed through the exercise faster than any of the other recruits. She was determined to demonstrate to her husband that she was the more qualified astronaut trainee.
    MICROGRAVITY
    Microgravity space walk during the astronaut training experience at Kennedy Space Center. (Photo by Dave Parfitt)

    Microgravity "space walk" during the astronaut training experience at Kennedy Space Center. (Photo by Dave Parfitt)
    Next, time for a stroll on the surface of Mars. One team member strapped on a sophisticated virtual reality headset grabbed two handheld controllers, and was guided remotely through a task on “Mars.” The experience was so immersive, you couldn’t help but react and jump to what was happening around you. Rocks moved, doors opened, and dust storms blinded you – if NASA could have somehow changed our weight perception, we certainly would have believed we were walking on the face of the Red Planet.
    SPACE WALK
    Virtual Reality walk on Mars during the astronaut training experience at Kennedy Space Center. (Photo by Dave Parfitt)

    Virtual Reality walk on Mars during the astronaut training experience at Kennedy Space Center. (Photo by Dave Parfitt)
    Our final station was the Mars Lander/Rover simulator. “Easy or hard?” The instructor asked. “You flip upside down 4-5 times on the hard setting,” she said. Without hesitation, my daughter exclaimed “HARD!” We were tasked with landing on the surface of Mars and then driving in the Rover to Mars Base 1. We came in hard on the landing and tumbled like a wind-blown grocery bag across the surface, and the simulator shared every bump and roll. The Rover driving didn’t fare much better as we ended up with a shattered windshield. All-and-all, not the best showing of our three training stations.
    WATCH NASA LAUNCH ITS ORION MOON CAPSULE ATOP A MISSILE IN SPECTACULAR SAFETY TEST
    Following the individual training exercises, all recruits gathered for a de-briefing and informational session about the International Space Station. All guides and instructors were incredibly knowledgeable and passionate about space, and gladly answered all of our questions. It was a highly educational experience filled with realistic science and engineering applications that seamlessly blended virtual reality with physical experiences.
    NASA SIMULATOR
    One of the two, 2-person Mars Lander/Rover simulators at Kennedy Space Center’s astronaut training experience. (Photo by Dave Parfitt)

    One of the two, 2-person Mars Lander/Rover simulators at Kennedy Space Center’s astronaut training experience. (Photo by Dave Parfitt)
    Following our rigorous day of training, we ate, drank, and relaxed just like those original astronauts during the space race. We headed to the Tiki Bar at the venerable Cocoa Beach Pier (built in 1962) that offered views of those historic Apollo launches 50 years ago.
    CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP
    COCOA BEACH PIER
    Drinks and sunset at Cocoa Beach Pier following a long day of astronaut training. (Photo by Dave Parfitt)

    Drinks and sunset at Cocoa Beach Pier following a long day of astronaut training. (Photo by Dave Parfitt)
    The Astronaut Training Experience is located within the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, but costs separate from regular admission and tour prices. The 5-hour Astronaut Training Program is only offered on select days and costs $175/person. The minimum age is 10 years old, and those 10-17 require a paying, participating adult to accompany them. You do not need to purchase admission to Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex for this experience. It’s a great half-day activity especially for those that have already toured Kennedy Space Center or have a limited time on a cruise docked at Port Canaveral.
     
    CrusaderV

    CrusaderV

    Well-Known Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Soon Mars will be conquered by the Crusader in Chief with the Space-force
     
    CrusaderV

    CrusaderV

    Well-Known Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Mike Stone, Jeff Mason
    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Republican U.S. President Donald Trump on Tuesday signed a directive to start the lengthy process of creating a new branch of the military dedicated to handling threats in space, the U.S. Space Force.


    U.S. President Donald Trump displaus the "Space Policy Directive 4" after signing the directive establish a Space Force as the sixth branch of the Armed Forces in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington, U.S., February 19, 2019. REUTERS/Jim Young
    Space Policy Directive 4 sets the foundation for a legislative initiative to establish a new force under the aegis of the Air Force, the branch currently responsible for space, comparable to the Marines under the U.S. Navy.
    The Trump administration has said it plans to usher in the force by 2020. But the legislation will have to be approved by Congress, which could be an uphill battle with the House of Representatives now controlled by Democrats.
    In an Oval Office signing ceremony on Tuesday, the president called the Space Force a national security priority.
    Among other things, the force will be responsible for a range of space-based U.S. military capabilities, which include everything from satellites enabling the Global Positioning System (GPS) to sensors that help track missile launches.
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    The force would have both “combat and combat support functions to enable prompt and sustained offensive and defensive space operations,” the memo signed on Tuesday said.
    Mac Thornberry, the top-ranked Republican on the House Armed Services Committee, praised the initiative, saying in a statement on Tuesday that it “is an important next step towards real reform of national security space where we face real threats posed by Russia and China.”
    He did not give details.
    Proponents of the Space Force have said it would make the Pentagon more efficient. But it has also faced criticism from some senior military officials and lawmakers. Democratic Senator Brian Schatz, who is on the Defense Appropriations subcommittee, last year called it a “dumb idea.”
    U.S. Air Force chief General David Goldfein told the Brookings Institution think tank that the creation of the Space Force, the first new military branch since the Air Force was set up in 1947, was still a ways off and that “intricate details of how we move forward in establishing this service within the Department of the Air Force” were still being worked out.
    “From a war-fighting perspective, the most important step that we take going forward, and the one that we need to do the quickest, is to establish a U.S. Space Command as a combatant commander,” to command personnel and materials, he said.
    Patrick Shanahan, now acting secretary of defense and then-deputy secretary, said last year the force could have an initial budget of less than $5 billion. On Tuesday, a Pentagon official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said initial start-up costs were estimated at $72 million.
    The proposal will be submitted to Congress in “the coming weeks,” chief Pentagon spokesperson Charles Summers said.
     
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