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MALI: France’s newest Quagmire

Chris306

Chris306

Member
The French brought it unto themeselves, they supported the al-Qaida in Libya. next time a terror attack hits the West, we should tell them that they only have themeselves to blame.
I think most people supported it at first, until they seen who the bad guys really were.
 
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  • J. Abizeid

    J. Abizeid

    Well-Known Member
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-21239247



    Conflict leaves Mali's tourism in ruins


    28 January 2013
    Mali's tourism industry is an important part of the nation's economy, but the recent uprising by militant Islamist groups has led to a dramatic fall in visitor numbers.
    French-led forces have now taken control of the desert city of Timbuktu, which Islamist rebels have held for almost a year.
    Locals traders hope visitor numbers will pick up now that the French have helped secure some towns.
    Laeila Adjovi reports from the ancient city of Djenne, five hundred kilometres north of the capital Bamako.
     
    J. Abizeid

    J. Abizeid

    Well-Known Member
    Surprise, Surprise

    http://english.al-akhbar.com/content/us-drone-war-may-expand-northwest-africa-report



    US drone war may expand to northwest Africa: report



    A picture taken on 13 June 2010 shows a US Predator unmanned drone armed with a missile standing on the tarmac of Kandahar military airport in Afghanistan. (Photo: AFP - Massoud Hossaini)

    Published Tuesday, January 29, 2013

    The US military plans to expand its drone program to northwest Africa to bolster surveillance of Islamic militant groups, the New York Times reported Monday.
    A US official who spoke on condition of anonymity confirmed the plans to AFP.
    The base for the robotic, unmanned aircraft would likely be located in Niger, on the eastern border of Mali, where French forces are currently waging a campaign against al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM), the official said.
    Initial plans only call for surveillance flights to monitor militants’ movements and collect information, but they would likely expand to allow for air strikes similar to those that have killed thousands in Yemen, Pakistan and Somalia.
    Officials told the US daily that all options for the drone program remain on the table, while acknowledging the likelihood of alienating locals who oppose the deadly practice.
    A recent study concluded that the US Drone War stirs fear and panic, and drives anti-American sentiments, in affected countries. The aircraft frequently launch air strikes on public gatherings including weddings and funerals, after apparently mistaking them for militant training grounds.
    Figures compiled by the Bureau for Investigative Journalism last year found that US drones killed between 2,562 and 3,325 people in Pakistan alone between June 2004 and September 2012. Among them, between 474 and 881 were civilians, including 176 children.
    If the plan gets the green light, up to 300 US military service members and contractors could be sent to the base to operate the drone aircraft, according to the New York Times.
    But State Department spokeswoman Victoria Nuland reiterated that there are no plans to commit US troops to any fighting on the ground.
    "The US military is not going to be engaged in combat operations in Mali," she stressed, "and we don't expect US forces to become directly involved on the ground in combat either."
    The United States and Niger signed a status of forces agreement Monday, which allows US forces to operate in the country, and provides them with a level of diplomatic immunity. The Pentagon secures such agreements for base arrangements or troop deployments.
    (Al-Akhbar, AFP)
     
    dodzi

    dodzi

    Legendary Member
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-21239247



    Conflict leaves Mali's tourism in ruins


    28 January 2013
    Mali's tourism industry is an important part of the nation's economy, but the recent uprising by militant Islamist groups has led to a dramatic fall in visitor numbers.
    French-led forces have now taken control of the desert city of Timbuktu, which Islamist rebels have held for almost a year.
    Locals traders hope visitor numbers will pick up now that the French have helped secure some towns.
    Laeila Adjovi reports from the ancient city of Djenne, five hundred kilometres north of the capital Bamako.
    This is absolutely shocking! When Lebanon is in conflict, the tourism industry booms! We get all types of nationalities coming in: Palestinian, Syrian, Israeli, Saudi, Russian, Jordanian, Iranian, Egyptian, etc.!:icon10:
     
    Danny Z

    Danny Z

    Legendary Member
    Some don’t learn from history…
    That’s why it keeps on repeating itself…
    Remember that?

    The mission was to stop the flow of islamists into the capital and maintaining Bamako under the government control, then driving Islamists out of the cities and towns they occupied, so far it is working. It is fast, swift and maintaining objectives.

    The picture of Bush is irrelevant 7aj tekhlot she3ben bi ramadan, there is no sign of any quagmire. The french are kicking the Islamists incurring very little casualties then they can withdraw whenever they want and the situation at worse can become what it was before they came.

    This is in no way comparable to the US in Iraq, the US had to stay because if they had left after they removed Saddam the situation would have been worse for them than before they removed him and that was a quagmire. In Mali it couldn't get worse than before the french came.
     
    Chris306

    Chris306

    Member
    The Islamist toweltops are fleeing like scared ***** cats, destroying every piece of history in their path.

    They are lucky it was the French, not the Americans, or else they would not be fleeing at all.

    A la prochaine fois
     
    Venom

    Venom

    Legendary Member
    The Islamist toweltops are fleeing like scared ***** cats, destroying every piece of history in their path.

    They are lucky it was the French, not the Americans, or else they would not be fleeing at all.

    A la prochaine fois
    They are like cockroaches, if u don't step on them they will run to the sewages.
     
    J. Abizeid

    J. Abizeid

    Well-Known Member
    Tfeh.

    [fieldset="Qatar"]Is Qatar fuelling the crisis in north Mali?

    It quoted an unnamed source in French military intelligence saying: “The MNLA [secular Tuareg separatists], al Qaeda-linked Ansar Dine and MUJAO [movement for unity and Jihad in West Africa] have all received cash from Doha.”

    A month later Sadou Diallo, the mayor of the north Malian city of Gao [which had fallen to the Islamists] told RTL radio: “The French government knows perfectly well who is supporting these terrorists. Qatar, for example, continues to send so-called aid and food every day to the airports of Gao and Timbuktu.”
    a very nice revelation.Qatar should know that the West gets to decide which salafists,where and when support must be given to the terrorists and takfiris.and if the West decides today to go against the terrorists and rebels in syria,qatar does not possess the decision making to continue its support to destabilize syria.

    and i hope the west gets to learn that they do not own the right to decide who to brand a "terrorist" or "freedom fighter" at their convinience,and where and when as it suits their interests,in total disregard for human rights, life and values.
    "
    Unfortunately most of us don’t notice such “minor” details.
    We are supposed to get excited and thankful to see the west come to the rescue only to find out the west is trying to extinguish the fire they themselves had started.
    That’s what I meant in my post below…

    Not that I don’t agree with the verdict, the fact remains, the west knows exactly what they’re doing. What other excuse France would have today in order to move its troops to Mali and put its hands on the country’s minerals and natural recourses if Kaddafi was still alive controlling the radicals and keeping them in check.
    History never stops repeating itself from the Tripartite Aggression and the Suez War, to Suddam moving into Kuwait and the 9/11 events, all such events were “convenient” excuses for the west to take over the rest of the world not necessarily by force, sometimes by invitation.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suez_Crisis
    Nasser was the perfect example who stopped the Muslim Brotherhood only to become the victim of the MB own enemies…
     
    kappa273

    kappa273

    Well-Known Member
    yesterday on PBS night news..
    they talked about Mali.

    with the help of the French armed forces, the Malian army liberated Timbuktu and Goa for those vermins...

    of course, those dirt bags didn't leave Timbuktu without burning the libraries.. They also showed bank transfers and receipts from KSA and Qatar...

    it's amazing how the west plays those people... they provide them a little support in Syria, they kicked their butts in Mali, they hunt them like hogs in Pakistan and Yemen.. they allow a little upper hand in Egypt then reduce them...

    they are just toys to be used and disposed of when not needed anymore..

    kappa
     
    J. Abizeid

    J. Abizeid

    Well-Known Member
    And to those who are busy ignoring the message because they don’t like the messenger…
    Even those who fully support the French move into Mali admit the serious possibility of a French quagmire.
    As long as there are French boots in Mali, I feel sorry for the parents of those soldiers’ sitting ducks waiting for the terrorist insurgency to gather and attack them.
    And to the short sighted I suggest, go back and researcher how many months it took the insurgents in Iraq to materialize.
    Not to mention the 1983 Beirut barracks on the US marines, why should the French be immune?
    But hey, those getting rich of selling arms and exploiting other countries resources have their kids studding at Harvard Business School. They have nothing to worry about…

    And BTW, I’m not the one who invented the word "quagmire", Not that those denying it understand what it means…

    euronews the network: Could France's intervention in Mali spell 'quagmire'?


    [vbtube]WL9h7DaUVZc[/vbtube]
     
    fidelio

    fidelio

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    And to those who are busy ignoring the message because they don’t like the messenger…
    Even those who fully support the French move into Mali admit the serious possibility of a French quagmire.
    As long as there are French boots in Mali, I feel sorry for the parents of those soldiers’ sitting ducks waiting for the terrorist insurgency to gather and attack them.
    And to the short sighted I suggest, go back and researcher how many months it took the insurgents in Iraq to materialize.
    Not to mention the 1983 Beirut barracks on the US marines, why should the French be immune?
    But hey, those getting rich of selling arms and exploiting other countries resources have their kids studding at Harvard Business School. They have nothing to worry about…

    And BTW, I’m not the one who invented the word "quagmire", Not that those denying it understand what it means…

    euronews the network: Could France's intervention in Mali spell 'quagmire'?


    [vbtube]WL9h7DaUVZc[/vbtube]
    It's similar to what Berri used to call the Lebanese "swamp". This French intervention will prove to be nothing less than an African Iraq that will spread beyond Mali.
     
    J. Abizeid

    J. Abizeid

    Well-Known Member
    It's similar to what Berri used to call the Lebanese "swamp". This French intervention will prove to be nothing less than an African Iraq that will spread beyond Mali.
    As mush as I hate to agree with you I must admit you’re absolutely correct!
     
    Robin Hood

    Robin Hood

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    I'm sure many Africans wish they were still under European rule...
     
    J. Abizeid

    J. Abizeid

    Well-Known Member
    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...be-nipped-in-the-bud/articleshow/18261793.cms

    Conflict in Mali: Islamist terrorism in north Africa must be nipped in the bud

    Jan 31, 2013

    As French troops continue their push against Islamist rebels in northern Mali, there is an urgent need for a comprehensive strategy to deal with the rise of jihadi insurgents and al-Qaida affiliates in Africa`s Sahara and Sahel regions. The French intervention stems from a UN Security Council mandate responding to the security and humanitarian crises in Mali. Taking advantage of a military coup early last year, al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb and its affiliate Ansar Dine began expanding their footprint in that country. They preyed on the grievances of the nomadic Tuareg inhabiting the country`s north and imposed their puritanical version of Islam as they went along capturing town after town in their drive south. The alarm bells started ringing as the Islamists advanced towards the capital city of Bamako.

    Whether it is the Boko Haram in Nigeria or the Movement of the Sons of the Sahara for Islamic Justice — one of the groups involved in the recent attack on an Algerian gas plant — Islamist terrorism is clearly on the rise in north Africa. There is evidence to suggest that al-Qaida remnants from Iraq and Afghanistan are increasingly making their way to this region. This combined with a flourishing illegal trade in arms, drug money and weak local governance structures makes for a dangerous cocktail. That the region is a significant producer of oil and gas further heightens the potential threat to global security and economy. However, north Africa hasn`t become another Afghanistan as yet. It is the African people that must ultimately fight the battle against Islamist militancy and strengthen democratic institutions. The international community must consolidate its efforts towards that end and provide aid and material support to the people of Mali and other north African nations to fight the scourge of terrorism.
     
    J. Abizeid

    J. Abizeid

    Well-Known Member
    http://www.euronews.com/2013/01/30/mali-french-seek-allies/

    Mali, French seek allies

    Former colonial power France intervened militarily in Mali on 11 January to stop Islamist fighters from taking over any more of it. France was the only foreign country to take this action. The loosely trained and under-equipped army of Mali is deployed with the French but Western allies have been economical with their support, offering money and less costly diplomatic encouragement
    Paris was given clearance by Spain and Algeria to fly over them; a few countries offered to transport troops but not to send their own soldiers, and the US itself is reluctant to be drawn into a shooting war with the jihadists in Mali.
    US Army Colonel Shawn Underwood said: “The United States is engaged in logistical and intelligence support of the French military. We are not, not doing any combat operations.”
    There are 3,500 French troops on the ground in Mali with upwards of 2,000 African troops, according to the latest French Defence Ministry information.
    France also has jet fighters and helicopters in action but its foreign minister has said: “Now it’s up to African countries to take over.”
    Paris is keen to hand over to an African force, in spite of the uncertainty over its potential for protecting northern Mali’s cities against possible further moves by the Islamists. In any case, help from Mali’s regional allies is on its way.
    Nigerian Army Colonel Soumaila Babayako said: “The Nigerian contingent will be followed immediately by Togo’s contingent, then Burkina Faso’s, Niger and so forth.”
    In addition to those pledges – ranging from hundreds of men to one or two thousand – will come additional armed contributions from Senegal, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Ghana, Benin and Chad.
    The Nigerians began crossing into Mali on Monday.
    The African-led International Support Mission to Mali is alternately referred to as AFISMA and MISMA – for International Support Mission for Mali.
    This will amount to a total of nearly 9,000 troops, at a projected initial cost of 740 million euros.
    So far the main AFISMA-destined pledges of cash have come from the United States, the EU, the African Union and the Economic Community Of West African States.
    Other donors, such as Canada, preferred their aid boost to go through UN and non-government agencies for food, medical care and other basic needs.
     
    J. Abizeid

    J. Abizeid

    Well-Known Member
    Engdahl: Pentagon's Hand Behind French Intervention in Mali

    [vbtube]7qDjKdZKRiI[/vbtube]​
     
    J. Abizeid

    J. Abizeid

    Well-Known Member
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-21267285


    Mali conflict: Sandstorm 'blocks' French troops advance


    France says a sandstorm is preventing its forces from entering the last major town in northern Mali in their offensive against Islamist militants.
    The troops remained "blocked" at the airport in Kidal, the French defence minister said.
    His statement appeared to conflict with earlier reports that French troops were in the town and militants had left.
    French and Malian forces have been sweeping north, earlier taking Gao and Timbuktu with almost no resistance.
    The retreating Islamist militants have been accused of destroying ancient manuscripts held in Timbuktu, but a senior official now says that most of the documents are safe.
    France - the former colonial power in Mali - launched a military operation this month after militants appeared to be threatening the south.
    Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius said on Wednesday that France intended to leave Mali "quickly", and it was up to African countries to take over.
    Several hundred soldiers from West African countries - including Niger and Chad - are already in Mali to help the operation against the militants.
     
    J. Abizeid

    J. Abizeid

    Well-Known Member
    Apparently, Mission NOT Accomplished…

    http://www.voanews.com/con


    February 03, 2013
    French Jets Attack Militant Positions in Mali



    The French military says its aircraft have attacked Islamist militant positions in northeast Mali, just hours after President Francois Hollande visited the African country.

    Military officials say the overnight raids hit militant training and logistics sites in the areas of Kidal and Tessalit, close to the Algerian border.

    On Saturday, Mr. Hollande told Malians that terrorism has been repelled and chased out, but not yet conquered.

    In an appearance with Mali's interim president, Dioncounda Traore, the French leader said his country had a duty to intervene and help Malian forces push Islamist militants from their strongholds in the north.


    "City after city, village after village, the Malian and French armies, helped by the West African countries, give Mali its integrity and strength back."


    He told a cheering crowd in the capital, Bamako, French forces were fighting so that Malians in the former French colony could live in peace and have democracy.



    Mr. Traore thanked Mr. Hollande for France's intervention and warned Malians against seeking vengeance for militant attacks.

    Mr. Hollande's one-day tour of Mali came three weeks after the start of France's intervention.

    The president, accompanied by the defense and finance ministers, visited Sevare and the ancient town of Timbuktu before heading to Bamako.

    In Timbuktu, dancers and drummers greeted the French president, while Malians chanted, "Vive La France." He toured an ancient mosque and a library that had both been targeted by militants.

    Mr. Hollande told reporters the Malian army had played a key role in liberating towns in the region.



    "All the cities which were freed, were freed by the Malian army, supported by the French army. It was always the Malians who entered first. Kidal, they needed to go to the airport and there were very special circumstances, then there were sand storms, so that has stopped the operation but it will continue, because our will and the one expressed by Mali is that France puts itself at the service of Mali within the framework of the United Nations and it is one of the complete return of territorial integrity in Mali."



    Mr. Hollande is pushing for African forces to take over for French troops that have been battling insurgents.

    The Tuareg rebel group MNLA has been fighting for a Tuareg homeland. It seized part of northern Mali last year and later joined forces with Islamic militants when the Malian government collapsed. The Tuaregs later split with the militants when they imposed conservative Islamic law in the north, and the MNLA now says it backs the French military operation in Mali.
     
    J. Abizeid

    J. Abizeid

    Well-Known Member
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-21314779

    3 February 2013

    French jets bomb northern Mali




    The French have made much ground, but there are fears rebels may re-group in the mountains near Kidal

    French warplanes have carried out air strikes in Mali's far north as they try to secure the final rebel stronghold of Kidal after a three-week offensive.
    Thirty jets targeted Islamist militants' training and communication centres around Tessalit - a mountainous area near the Algerian border.
    French President Francois Hollande has pledged to help rebuild Mali after the rebels who seized its north are beaten.
    But there are fears the fighters could re-group in the mountains near Kidal.
    Although French troops captured Kidal's airport on Wednesday, rebels from a Tuareg group who want their own homeland in northern Mali - the MNLA - still have control of the town itself.
    Malian Interim President Dioncounda Traore has offered to hold talks with the MNLA in order to help secure Kidal.
    It may be that this is achieved through diplomacy rather than through force, says the BBC's Thomas Fessy in Mali's capital, Bamako.
    At the same time, French-led forces will begin chasing down Islamist militants who have retreated to desert or to mountainous hide-outs, adds our correspondent.
    Speaking in Bamako on Saturday, Mr Hollande pledged more French aid to its former colony and vowed to restore cultural sites damaged by the rebels.
    Mr Hollande received a warm welcome on Saturday as he visited the northern desert city of Timbuktu, which was recaptured by French and Malian troops a week ago.
    A total of 3,500 French troops are currently in Mali.
    Nearly 2,000 army personnel from Chad and Niger are already helping consolidate the recent gains. A further 6,000 troops will be deployed as part of the UN-backed African-led International Support Mission to Mali (Afisma).
    Despite the rapid progress of French forces in recapturing parts of the north, it may be premature to talk of mission accomplished, analysts say.
    It is thought the mountainous areas around Kidal provide perfect hiding places for the militants.
    On Saturday Mr Hollande said it would be wrong to assume the operation was over while Mr Traore said it would be difficult to completely rid the country of Islamists.
     
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