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Migrant domestic workers

Danny Z

Danny Z

Legendary Member
Lol why is this racism? This is actually pretty funny. This taunt supports the lebanese forces and wants to go to a rally, this sri lanki works for her so I see nothing wrong here..just typical lebanese... and what if this sri lankiyi is a christian and supports the LF, Ihave met some that do. And no need to attack her looks, it is uncalled for.
Dude she's ethiopian, you're mixing sri lankis and Ethiopian while slapping others for being racists...
 
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  • Aegon

    Aegon

    Active Member
    Dude she's ethiopian, you're mixing sri lankis and Ethiopian while slapping others for being racists...

    Doesn't matter if she is ethiopien or sri lanki, both of these people work in lebanon for money, it doesn't negate the point. And my moneys on her being sri lanki.
     
    Leb_Rebel

    Leb_Rebel

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Lol why is this racism? This is actually pretty funny. This taunt supports the lebanese forces and wants to go to a rally, this sri lanki works for her so I see nothing wrong here..just typical lebanese... and what if this sri lankiyi is a christian and supports the LF, Ihave met some that do. And no need to attack her looks, it is uncalled for.
    :biggrin::biggrin::biggrin: :biggrin::biggrin::biggrin: :biggrin::biggrin::biggrin: :biggrin::biggrin::biggrin: :biggrin::biggrin:
     
    Danny Z

    Danny Z

    Legendary Member
    Doesn't matter if she is ethiopien or sri lanki, both of these people work in lebanon for money, it doesn't negate the point. And my moneys on her being sri lanki.
    It doesn't matter?! lol and you're accusing others of being racists hehe
    and how much money you want to pay me, maybe tbarra3 fiyyon to the victims of the explosion because the woman said it on TV that her maid is Ethipian and that she replaced the Sri Lanki because she was loud. That is the same woman that brought the Sri Lanki she dismissed now to the demonstration back then in 2005.
     
    Aegon

    Aegon

    Active Member
    It doesn't matter?! lol and you're accusing others of being racists hehe
    and how much money you want to pay me, maybe tbarra3 fiyyon to the victims of the explosion because the woman said it on TV that her maid is Ethipian and that she replaced the Sri Lanki because she was loud. That is the same woman that brought the Sri Lanki she dismissed now to the demonstration back then in 2005.
    I haven't accused anyone of being racist, where r u people getting these things from? I only accused hanna of being prejudice against me and against the woman.
     
    Ashrafieh_LF

    Ashrafieh_LF

    Well-Known Member
    you remind me of the member who was defending banning domestic staff from swimming

    typical lebanese backward mentality.................bass when you guys travel oversees, [] you line in lines and [] you take instructions from these same domestic staff people......

    its not your fault, you were raised with the idea that you belong to the supreme race of lebanese.....
    Actually your post is very racist towards this lady. You assume that just because she's a maid she doesn't follow the news and has no political views? What a racist behavior. It's like telling a Lebanese worker in France not to participate in political activities! Typical backward mentality.
     
    Rafidi

    Rafidi

    Legendary Member
    Lol why is this racism? This is actually pretty funny. This taunt supports the lebanese forces and wants to go to a rally, this sri lanki works for her so I see nothing wrong here..just typical lebanese... and what if this sri lankiyi is a christian and supports the LF, Ihave met some that do. And no need to attack her looks, it is uncalled for.
    Ask the christian sri lankan maid to support the LF in colombo and not in beirut.lebanon is not france and citizenship is not granted to migrant workers.therefore foreigners have no business in lebanese politics.it is racist what your taunt is doing because she's using the maid as an object in public.and stop your "may be" since you're not sure of what you're saying.

    Imagine if Hezballah got iranians to fly their flag in beirut,what would have happened in the farteen media?!

    Have people got no shame anymore?
     
    Abou Sandal

    Abou Sandal

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Actually your post is very racist towards this lady. You assume that just because she's a maid she doesn't follow the news and has no political views? What a racist behavior. It's like telling a Lebanese worker in France not to participate in political activities! Typical backward mentality.
    You call holding the flag of LF and Man2ousheh for Madame, "participating in political activities"?

    Lol...

    On a second thought, you may be honest, because I never saw LF way of "participating in political activities" reach a better level...

    Maybe this just what they teach you about politics in the school of LF..." Just go sit over there and and hold that flag, and if you get hungry, take a Man2ousheh with you".

    Yes your post sounds more logical now...
     
    HannaTheCrusader

    HannaTheCrusader

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Actually your post is very racist towards this lady. You assume that just because she's a maid she doesn't follow the news and has no political views? What a racist behavior. It's like telling a Lebanese worker in France not to participate in political activities! Typical backward mentality.
    Really ? Wool www
     
    LebanonUSA

    LebanonUSA

    Well-Known Member
    More reasons why many of us are embarrassed to share the same DNA as some of our "compatriots"...

    [FIELDSET="ضحية جديدة للعنصرية في لبنان؟ ألكسندرا سقطت من السابع وهذا ما حصل في المستشفى!"]لا تزال ألكسندرا الشابة الفيليبينية تصارع الموت منذ ايام علماً ان حالها لا تزال دقيقة جداً فهي قد تشهد تدهوراً وقد تتمرّد على كل البكتيريا التي تأكل جسدها، وعلى الكسور التي تسببت فيها محاولة انتحارها، أو وقوعها عن الشرفة اثناء تنظيف زجاج شقة مخدومها في الطابق السابع في إحدى المناطق الراقية في بيروت .

    وبالعودة الى بداية الحكاية فإن الكسندرا نقلت قبل اشهر إلى أحد المستشفيات الخاصة، وهي مصابة بكسور في ظهرها وجروح في رئتيها، لكن مخدومها دخل ليلاً إلى المستشفى بعد ثلاثة أيام من الحادثة، وأصرّ على إخراجها ونقلها إلى احد المستشفيات الحكومية، على الرغم من أن شركة تأمين خاصة، كانت تتكفل بعلاجها وبكلفة العملية الخاصة كما أوضحت الصحافية جنين جلخ في مقالتها في صحيفة “لوريان لوجور“.

    ولكن ألكسندرا اخرجت من المستشفى “لتدفن حيّة” في مستشفى حكومي في بيروت، وقد بقيت شهراً ونصف الشهر من دون أن تخضع لاي عملية جراحية، في حين انها بدأت تفقد قدراتها، وتتأقلم مع آلامها غير المحمولة، إلى أن التقطت بكتيريا klebsiella من المسشتفى، والتي جعلت خضوعها لاي عملية أمراً مستحيلا .

    في غضون ذلك ارتأى الطاقم الطبي، شيئاً آخراً، وخصوصاً بعدما علم أن هناك متابعة صحافية للموضوع ، فعندها خضعت الكسندرا لثلاث عمليات جراحية، لكن العمليات اتت متأخرة، وقد تؤدي إلى موتها وشللها، بسبب البكتيريا .

    واليوم ترقد الكسندرا في المستشفى البيروتي تنتظر موتها، وهي ابنة الخامسة والعشرين ولم تعد تتكلم، بعد ثقب حنجرتها بحجة علاجها، وهي تركت طفلها الصغير لتعمل في لبنان، علّ مستقبله يكون افضل من مستقبلها. لكن هذا الطفل قد لا يرى والدته ثانية.[/FIELDSET]​

    http://www.tayyar.org/Tayyar/News/PoliticalNews/ar-LB/maid-dying-lebanon-alexandra-zek-174.htm
     
    J. Abizeid

    J. Abizeid

    Well-Known Member
    http://english.al-akhbar.com/content/racist-lebanese-travels-sri-lanka

    A "Racist" Lebanese Travels to Sri Lanka



    Sri Lankan Tamil Hindu devotees dance during the Hindu religious ceremony in Wattala on 10 July 2013. (Photo: AFP - Ishara S.Kodikara)


    Published Monday, July 15, 2013

    What makes the Land of the Cedars more unique than the Land of Luxury Tea? The answer is nothing. Sri Lanka goes forward on the path to development, while Lebanon treads the path of backwardness.
    Colombo – Sri Lanka is a nationality, not a profession. This should be clear to everyone. However, in Lebanon, the situation is different. A “Sri Lankan,” here, could be from Bangladesh, Ethiopia, or the Philippines. The identity has become a synonym for domestic service workers. In Lebanon, it’s normal to hear someone asking her friend, "Which country is your 'Sri Lankan' from?" The question is full of ignorance, even hatred and irrational racism, pointing to a feeling of Lebanese superiority toward the people of Sri Lanka.
    Those who ask it are ignorant that there is a full-fledged country called Sri Lanka, formerly known as Ceylon and, in ancient times, Serendipity. It has a civilization which goes further back in time, ages before Christ. Yet the people who live there are reduced by some idiots here to the status of “servant.” Some are unaware that their favorite tea was grown, manufactured, and made famous by that people.
    In fact, the issue goes beyond domestic workers. The moniker “Sri Lankan” in Lebanon refers to anything considered “lower.” One often hears Lebanese comparing a woman to a Sri Lankan, as a form of denigration
    One of the quickest ways to hear some phrases is when one declares they will be visiting Sri Lanka for tourism. "Are you really going to Sri Lanka?" one would ask, as if one had mentioned an incredible event. But why this disgusting arrogance?
    Lamentable Comparisons
    The comparisons begin as soon as you step on Sri Lanka's soil. The airport in the capital Colombo is where the surprises begin. The prepaid mobile phone card is not just cheap, compared to Lebanon, but high-speed Internet mobile service, 4G, has been available throughout the country, which is five times the size of Lebanon, for over a year. In Lebanon, it is still under trial and limited to some neighborhoods in Beirut.
    The 3G service, which has recently arrived in Lebanon, has been available in Sri Lanka for the past four years. The network does not break, whether in Colombo in the west, Kandy in the center of the country, or Trincomalee in the north. The service is fast and dependable. Nobody curses the Internet like in Lebanon.
    Public highways in Sri Lanka are more similar to those in Europe. The white lines on the highways are as bright as snow. The roads are illuminated throughout the night. There is nothing here, in any city, which resembles the dark highway between Tripoli and Beirut.
    In a country of 20 million, you rarely hear erratic car horns and might think silence is inscribed in the law. Later, you would find out that the people hate noise and prefer serenity. They have no idea about car gliding.
    We ask our taxi driver, Atholinaka, about power cuts. "Employees fix whatever malfunctions occur on the power lines due to the weather. It happens an average of four times a month and only lasts for a few hours," he answers. He is unaware of what this question means in Lebanon.
    Power cuts only occur during emergency malfunctions. Electricity is a given and there is no need to discuss it. In short, electricity in Sri Lanka is not rationed. After a few days spent around the luxurious tea farms, you ask yourself, is Lebanon better than Sri Lanka in anything?
    In Politics Too
    Some might say Lebanon went through a civil war and is today dealing with its consequences. But they would soon be disappointed to find out that Sri Lanka had a 25-year civil war between its two main ethnicities, the Hindu Tamil Tigers and the majority Buddhists who controlled the government. It ended four years ago and Sri Lanka is moving forward.
    Thus, there is no excuse for Lebanon. There is no reason for this sense of superiority. If there should be discrimination, indicators point to Lebanon as being inferior. The Lebanese, infamous for their jokes about other nations, are discovering that those nations are more civilized and advanced. Thus, the joke is on the Lebanese, whether they know it or not.
    While the Lebanese parliament was extending its term after failing to issue a new electoral law, Sri Lanka was enjoying an electoral process based on proportional representation. The Lebanese cannot dream of such a law, under the pretext of parity, quotas, not to mention the most famous mantra, “coexistence.”
    Again, such pretexts collapse at Sri Lanka's borders, even though the country, like Lebanon, is composed of various religions and sects, mainly Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, and Christianity. Moreover, Lebanon does not suffer from ethnic conflicts, while Sri Lanka has several ethnicities, the Sinhalese, Tamil, Moro, and Malawi.
    Everyone over 18 years old can vote in Sri Lanka. Do the activists in Lebanon, who have not stopped calling for lowering the voting age, know about this?
    In recent years, many people have become aware of the occupation of Lebanon’s public beachfront. Citizens cannot go to the beach without first having to pay a resort for access even though beach access is a legal right for every citizen. However, the corrupt and influential barons are stronger than the law.
    This is something you will not see in Sri Lanka. The country’s beaches facing the Indian Ocean outnumber those of Lebanon. Furthermore, they are the property of all citizens. Poor people can walk along the sand across from the fanciest hotels and resorts in Colombo, alongside the tourists and the wealthy. The same goes for all the coastal cities, from Negombo to Galle.
    This might annoy some tourists, but so what? The priority is for citizens. This is how tourists are seen by the people of Sri Lanka. It’s what the grocer, fishmonger, and leather merchant say. It is a general culture, opposite to what we have here. They do not suffer from feelings of inferiority to the white man and are proud of their civilization and current situation.
    Culture and Farming
    A visitor to Sri Lanka does not need much time to discover the level of culture and education. Most city dwellers speak English, going back to British colonialism in the island, which ended in 1948. However, the educational system is sophisticated, free from elementary to university, and compulsory until 14 years of age. Therefore, 90 percent of 15-year-old Sri Lankans are literate. In Lebanon, on the other hand, education is not free and not compulsory after the age of 13.
    Sri Lanka is an agricultural country of the finest type. People here eat what they grow. Their relation to the land is strong. The country is the number one exporter of tea worldwide, but it is also famous for its rice, coconut, and rubber. Agricultural activity absorbs 50 percent of the workforce, with the remaining work is distributed between industry and services. Today, all that is left of the relationship between Lebanese and their land are chants and traditional songs. If it was not for imports, we would not find anything to eat.
    As for transportation, in addition to cars, the use of motorcycles is encouraged by the state (as opposed to their arbitrary suppression in Lebanon due to the inability to organize them). There is also a network of rail that covers the country. Indian-made Tok Toks are also prevalent. Rarely does one find someone on a motorcycle here without a helmet. The percentage of women drivers is almost that of the men. The culture of “breaking the law” is not very popular there. Everyone fears policemen and respects them.
    Even animal rights supporters will find what they are looking for in Sri Lanka. Dogs sleep in the street. Cars tend to avoid them, not the opposite. People's relationship with animals is humanistic. They do not hurt them and provide them with food on the roadside, as part of the popular culture.
    This could be the impact of Buddhism, which forbids the harming of animals. There is no need for organizations calling for animal rights here.
    This is Sri Lanka, or some of it at least, the country whose citizens do not know much about Lebanon, except that it is an Arab country, "like Saudi Arabia and the Gulf." A tour guide in the Sigiriya region says the only thing he knows about Arabs is that "a Sri Lankan domestic worker was beheaded by sword last month after being falsely accused."
    The man, in his 70s, knows only this about Arabs. You are forced to tell him that you are Arab but not from Saudi. However, you feel ashamed about telling him what happens to the domestic workers in Lebanon, of all nationalities, who are treated like slaves under the oppressive "sponsorship" system.
     
    J. Abizeid

    J. Abizeid

    Well-Known Member
    http://english.al-akhbar.com/content/lebanon-justice-another-domestic-worker

    Lebanon: Justice for Another Domestic Worker



    An Ethiopian maid, right, chats with her Sri Lankan Neighbor, left, as they stand on balconies in Beirut, Lebanon Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2007. (Photo: AP - Grace Kassab)

    By: Rajana Hamyeh
    Published Monday, November 18, 2013

    A judge in Lebanon’s Keserwan, Dina Daaboul, issued a ruling in the case of Filipina domestic worker Anali Portugal. Though justice was delivered for Portugal, it was late in coming – the Philippines embassy filed the abuse complaint in Mount Lebanon in April 2008.
    Judge Daaboul did not let the lesions on Anali’s body, caused by her sponsor over the period of months, to go without compensation for “damages.”
    Judge Daaboul sentenced Portugal’s employer Wafaa M. to three months in jail and a fine of 100,000 Lebanese lira ($66) pursuant to the provisions of Article 555 of the penal code. She also ordered her to pay compensation to Portugal in the amount of 10,000,000 lira or ($6,600).
    The violence inflicted by Portugal’s employer covered “70 percent of her total body surface area,” according to a report issued on 26 April 2008 by Dr. Kevork Jian. “She was subject to frequent physical abuse and different types of injuries, including burns, incisions and bruises from all kinds of objects such as fist, fingers, iron, shoes, slippers and belts … ”
    Judge Daaboul, according to plaintiff attorney Layla Awada, “made it possible for the defendant to defend herself, especially when she questioned the veracity of the coroner’s report. But all [the judge] said is that the plaintiff is lying.”
    This verdict is the second of its kind, with the first being issues in July 2013 in favor of another domestic worker. Yet in both cases, justice came late. In the first case, the ruling was issued three years after the violence, and in the second case, after five years.
    Anali may not know that she won. We don’t know where she is now.
     
    J. Abizeid

    J. Abizeid

    Well-Known Member
    http://english.al-akhbar.com/content/ethiopian-maid-found-hanging-south-lebanon



    [HR][/HR]Ethiopian maid found hanging in South Lebanon


    Published Saturday, December 28, 2013

    An Ethiopian maid was found hanging from an electrical cord outside her employer's South Lebanon home in an apparent suicide, state news reported Saturday.
    The National News Agency identified the victim as Dimi Kash-Kalashou Kata. It published a
    disturbing image [1] of the woman hanging by her neck in the southern town of Rmeich.
    Police have launched an investigation into the incident, the report said, adding that they believed the woman hung herself as is common among maids in Lebanon, which hosts about 200,000 domestic workers.
    Domestic workers in Lebanon and other Arab countries are employed under the heavily criticized sponsorship, or kafala system which denies the maid the right to terminate her contract or leave her employer.
    Maids employed under this system are not covered by Lebanese labor laws, meaning they have no minimum wage, social security or other basic rights.
    It is almost always the case that an employer holds the maid's passport over fears she might run away. It is also common for an employer to lock the maid inside their home when they leave the house or travel.
    In July a Bangladeshi worker was found hanging in her employer's home in East Lebanon, and a month before that a pregnant Ethiopian maid committed suicide in Mount Lebanon.
    Human Rights Watch documented an average death rate of one per week among domestic workers due to unnatural causes in 2008. Those cases included suicides and death by falling from buildings.
    (Al-Akhbar)



     
    Nayla

    Nayla

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    الأخبار
    «الجلّاد» يؤدّب «العاملة الأجنبية»... باغتصابها


    ليس «عادياً» أن تُغتصب عاملة أجنبية، بعد ضربها وإذلالها، بحجّة تأديبها، ثم لا ينتفض كل من يعنيه الأمر. حصل ذلك قبل أيام، حيث هُتكت روح عاملة إثيوبية، وديست كرامتها الإنسانية.

    محمد نزال -

    ما زلنا نعيش زمن الرقّ. دعكم من كل المعاهدات والاتفاقيات، كل الدساتير والقوانين، كل النواميس التي تحظر العبودية وتعاقب عليها. المسألة في الرأس أولاً، في الذهنية والعقلية، في الموروث المتأصل، الذي لا يبدو أننا غادرناه بعد... هنا المسألة قبل أي مكان آخر. هل من «العادي» أن يمرّ خبر اغتصاب عاملة أجنبية، بعد ضربها وإذلالها، على يد «رجل» يعمل في المكتب الذي «استقدمها» من الخارج، بهدف «تأديبها» كما قيل، ثم لا يضج المعنيون بالخبر؟

    ألا يمسّ هذا الكرامة الإنسانية، للجميع، قبل أن يمسّ جسد تلك العاملة الإثيوبية المدمّى؟ حصل ذلك في بلدة كوسبا - الكورة (الشمال) قبل أيام. سيخرج من يقول، وهذا بالمناسبة يخرج باستمرار، إن هذه القضية «بسيطة» مقارنة بكل ما نراه من جرائم قتل في لبنان، وخارج لبنان، وبالتالي لماذا نتوقف عندها؟! يغيب، ربما، عن بال هؤلاء أن ما حصل، وما يحصل، في لبنان ومحيطه، إنما هو من أجل «الحرية» أو «الكرامة» (وفق مختلف الأيديولوجيات). فبالتالي، هل من لا يخشى على كرامة إنسان ضعيف عنده، كعاملة أجنبية، تراه يكون مستحقاً لهذه الكرامة في مكان آخر؟ وعندها أي قيمة يبقى لـ«نضاله» في أي قضية أخرى؟


    كان بإمكان شعبة العلاقات العامة في قوى الأمن الداخلي أن لا تورد الخبر، في بيان مستقل، وأن تبقي عليه طيّ الكتمان ككثير من أخبار الحوادث اليومية. ولكن كان للمقدم جوزف مسلّم رأي آخر. فعلها ونشر الخبر، معمماً إياه على وسائل الإعلام، لأن «القضية ليست عادية، وبالتالي هذه رسالة إلى كل من يفكر أن يستضعف فئة العاملات، ولهذا طلبنا من كل عاملة أو من باستطاعته مساعدتها في الحالات المماثلة، أن تتصل أو يتصل بنا على رقم الطوارئ لمتابعة الأمر».

    خيراً فعل مسلّم.

    ثمّة ما لم يرد في بيان قوى الأمن، لكن علمته «الأخبار» لاحقاً، وإليكم الرواية كما حصلت، علماً أن التحقيقات لم تنته بعد، وبالتالي يُنتظر أن تظهر معلومات إضافية بعد. بدأت القصة عندما تذمرت سيدة سبعينية، من عاملتها الإثيوبية ب.ا. (33 عاماً). اصطحبتها إلى المكتب الذي استقدمتها منه، الكائن في بلدة كوسبا الشمالية، وتديره سيدة لبنانية، وهي محامية. يُقال إن الأخيرة لم تكن في المكتب، فشكت السيدة العجوز عاملتها إلى السكرتيرة، وهي ل.س. (24 عاماً)، في طريقة بدت اعتيادية. ليس مهماً، هنا، الخلاف بين السيدة العجوز والعاملة لديها؛ فهذا بالأصل، لو كانت الذهنية سليمة إنسانياً، فإنه ما كان ليخرج عن إطار خلاف عادي بين موظف وصاحب عمله. لكن الحديث هنا عن «عاملة أجنبية»، أي تلك «العبدة» المكرّسة كذلك، بمفعول رجعي، نتيجة أعراف بالية معمول بها في لبنان. إنه «نظام الكفالة» وتوابعه، الذي يجعل من تلك العاملة «عبدة» أو «أمَة»، ولكن هذه المرة ـ وبأفظع مما جاء في أنظمة الرق القديمة ـ تُسبغ عليه الشرعية لنصبح أمام «سوق نخاسة» تحت ظل القانون!


    أهانت تلك السكرتيرة العاملة. قرّعتها بكلمات قاسية. طبيعي هنا أن نسمع عبارات من قبيل «ليش مش عم تفهمي يا حيوانة»، أو «أنا بفرجيكي يا بقرة».

    وبالفعل، لقد «فرجتها».

    اتصلت بأحد العاملين في المكتب المذكور، ووظيفته بالأصل سائق خصوصي، ولكن يبدو أن لديه وظيفة أخرى. ما هي يا تُرى؟ إنه الذي «يُربّي» العاملات الأجنبيات في المكتب. إنه الشخص الذي يأخذ دور «المطاوع» هنا. حضر على وجه السرعة، وراح «يبهدل» العاملة ويهينها، قبل أن يدخلها إلى غرفة منفردة في المكتب. راحت تصرخ، وهو يضرب، تصرخ أكثر فيضرب أكثر، والسكرتيرة في الخارج تسمع كل شيء، وكأن هذا هو «العادي» هناك. استخدم حزام وسطه في ضربها. كأنه ذاك السوط، الذي لطالما جُلد فيه العبيد على مر التاريخ، في صورة نمطية يأبى البعض جعلها من الماضي. عُرضت لاحقاً العاملة على طبيب شرعي، فأثبت وجود كدمات على جسدها، واللافت وجود كدمات في «المناطق الحساسة».

    لقد ضربها على أعضائها الجنسية. الكارثي في الأمر، بحسب المتابعين، أن ذاك «المتوحش» أعجب بجسد العاملة أثناء ضربها، اهتاج من عنفه على جسدها، فقرر اغتصابها، وهذا ما كان. لقد تم «تأديبها» أخيراً. طُلب منها أن «تسمع كلمة معلمتها»، وإلا فستنال العقاب ذاته كل مرّة. تُرى، أي روح بقيت في تلك العاملة؟ إن فعلت، غداً، ما يُخالف القانون، فهل من سيلومها؟ تحديداً إن لم ينصفها القانون، في معاقبة الفاعلين، فهل هناك من يمكنه أن يضع عينه في عينها إن فعلت ما لا يُرضي القانون؟

    كان لافتاً أن العاملة هي التي ادّعت لاحقاً بما حصل معها، أمام مفرزة طرابلس القضائية في وحدة الشرطة القضائية، بمعرفة السيدة التي تعمل لديها. هذا يطرح سؤال: كم عاملة حصل معها الأمر نفسه، وربما بما هو أفظع، ولم يعلم بأمرها أحد؛ لأنها لم تدّع أمام القوى الأمنية؟ هل يُتصور أن هؤلاء العاملات يعرفن طريق المخافر؟ من حُسن الحظ أن القضية حصلت بالتزامن مع مناوبة القاضي غسان باسيل في النيابة العامة. باسيل، الذي كان أوقف قبل نحو سنة رجلاً وامرأة، بتهمة ضرب عاملة أجنبية، وجد أن ضرب العاملة في كوسبا بالطريقة المذكورة، فضلاً عن اغتصابها، يستدعي بكل راحة ضمير أن يوقف الموظف في المكتب (الجلاد) والسكرتيرة أيضاً. هذا ما نقلته إلى «الأخبار» مصادر حقوقية متابعة للقضية. في إفادتها أمام المحققين، ذكرت العاملة علامات فارقة في جسد الذي اعتدى عليها، لتأكيد أنه نزع ثيابه في تلك الأثناء، قبل أن يأتي تقرير الطبيب الشرعي ويشير إلى الأمر. التحقيق مفتوح الآن، وسيُحال على قاضي التحقيق، بما يعنيه ذلك من احتمال استدعاء صاحبة المكتب، لمعرفة إن كان ما حصل «عادة ثابتة» أو حادثة. ربما شكلت الحادثة التي حصلت، فضلاً عمّا سبق من حوادث مشابهة، مناسبة لإعادة النظر في طبيعة عمل تلك المكاتب المُستثمرة في «استقدام العاملات الأجنبيات». الخبراء في هذا المجال يؤكدون أن لا رقابة مستمرة على تلك المكاتب، ولا على آليات عملها بنحو مباشر، ما يستدعي وضع خطة من قبل وزارة العمل للتفتيش باستمرار؛ إذ لا يمكن انتظار كل عاملة مغتصبة، أو معتدى عليها، حتى تدّعي بنفسها أمام القوى الأمنية. ومن المفيد السؤال هنا عن دور نقابة هذه المكاتب المذكورة، وأي دور لها في حماية العاملات، في ظل ثقافة «استعباد» لا يبدو أنها في طريقها إلى الاندثار في هذه البلاد البائسة.

    ربما بات لزاماً، هذه الأيام، أن يُردد على مسامع من يعنيهم الأمر مبادئ الإعلان العالمي لحقوق الإنسان، تحديداً نص المادة الأولى منه: «يولد جميع الناس أحراراً متساوين في الكرامة والحقوق، وقد وهبوا عقلاً وضميراً، وعليهم أن يعامل بعضهم بعضاً بروح الإخاء». كذلك سيكون من المفيد التذكير بالفقرة الأولى من ديباجة الإعلان المذكور: «الاعتراف بالكرامة المتأصلة في جميع أعضاء الأسرة البشرية، وبحقوقهم المتساوية الثابتة، هو أساس الحرية والعدل والسلام في العالم»
    .


    http://www.tayyar.org/Tayyar/News/PoliticalNews/ar-LB/koura-tripoli-mt-77415624.htm
     
    HannaTheCrusader

    HannaTheCrusader

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    tfeh
    disgusting people and disgusting officials

    wlek 10000000 tfeh on us, we think we are better and we are nothing but less than TWC
     
    J. Abizeid

    J. Abizeid

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    http://english.al-akhbar.com/content/domestic-workers-lebanon-push-syndicate


    Published on Al Akhbar English (http://english.al-akhbar.com)

    [HR][/HR]Domestic workers in Lebanon push for syndicate


    Domestic workers having their documents inspected by the Lebanese General Security at Beirut's airport. (Photo: Marwan Tahtah)

    By: Faten Elhajj
    Published Monday, March 24, 2014

    Domestic workers in Lebanon have not given up yet; against all odds, they remain committed to a unified campaign aimed at forming their own syndicate. Recently, the number of women joining the preliminary committee, hoping to turn it into an independent syndicate, has risen, and they were pleased to talk about their needs and to suggest solutions for their problems.
    Rose and her friends were preparing for a human rights ceremony. This Madagascarian young woman was proud that domestic workers were in charge of organizing the whole event. She was all dressed up, wearing a traditional Madagascarian outfit and talking to the media about what she dubbed as “our real image.”
    “What should I say? I have so many things to say that newspapers and TV screens are not enough. I want people to know that we are complete human beings and we have many skills other than working in houses. We can passionately express our feelings. We can read and write and we come from respected families. We have fathers and mothers that we love and that love us back,” Rose said.

    We can go out and show society how pretty we are and how smart we are, how we can have a distinct presence, just like any other woman, and we can stand on the frontline to fight for our rights, exactly like all laborers.She added: “we can go out and show society how pretty we are and how smart we are, how we can have a distinct presence, just like any other woman, and we can stand on the frontline to fight for our rights, exactly like all laborers.”According to Rose, domestic workers are fighting a unified battle despite coming from different countries. “When we sat together and met each other, we discovered that there are no differences between Filipinos, Sri Lankans, Madagascarians, Ethiopians, Benineses, Bengals, and Cameroonians when it comes to our working conditions. Basically, each and every one of us wants to be treated like a human being”.
    The domestic workers postponed their ceremony for a few minutes as they waited for some of their colleagues coming from Beirut neighbourhoods of Sabra and Tariq al-Jdideh. They said “many activists come from that region,” but they could not join them because of the clashes that erupted in the area on the morning of the ceremony.
    Each woman wore a traditional outfit and they spent some time taking souvenir photos before taking the stage at the UNESCO Palace to sing their new anthem. The lyrics called for equal rights with Lebanese laborers and asked for support in making the change happen, which would put workers and citizens in a better position.
    Domestic workers are demanding their rights, and according to Zeina Mezher, the national project coordinator of the International Labour Organization (ILO) project Promoting Rights of Women Domestic Workers, they chose two occasions that are dear to them to launch the ceremony: International Women’s Day and Mothers’ Day.
    These women are determined to use any occasion to make their voices heard, but with joy and in a manner that reflects their diverse cultures. They asked Mezher if Lebanese women were allowed to celebrate International Women’s Day and if a Lebanese woman employer would respect a domestic worker for fighting for her rights as a woman and as a laborer. Rose does not believe it is the case when it comes to the second question.
    Workers’ meetings started months ago within the framework of a project launched by the ILO in coordination with local NGOs seeking to bring in domestic workers to identify their own needs and to suggest solutions for their problems.
    Following many sessions held under the umbrella of the National Union of Workers and Employees Syndicates in Lebanon, domestic workers realized they have to impose their right in forming a syndicate. So they established a multinational committee and decided to fight this battle to the end.
    These workers are quite aware of all the challenges they will have to face, particularly legitimizing their presence within the framework of the Lebanese labor law. However, the committee keeps getting bigger and bigger with more women from African and Asian origins joining. They believe this is their cause and volunteering in the committee is their duty to keep this movement going, regardless of the projects launched by local NGOs and international organizations. In fact, domestic workers drafted an objectives’ list which was read by Emme Razanajay from Madagascar and Bandaline Binyiro from Philippines.
    The women called upon the Lebanese government to enact laws organizing their profession and to allow them to form a democratic syndicate. They called to abolish the sponsorship system and to treat domestic workers properly at airports while caring for them in case of death or disease.
    Turning to their own governments, Emme called to hold training sessions for domestic workers about bilateral agreements signed with Lebanon in order to organize recruitment and to provide a legal protection system in Lebanon that would reduce the dangers they face.
    Domestic workers called upon Lebanese employers to limit working hours and to acknowledge their rights to have a weekly day off and annual leave, while ending all sorts of physical, sexual, and verbal abuse they are being subjected to, and asked to be spared from all tasks that would put their lives in danger.
    According to Gima Gosto from the Philippines, the committee only aims to provide domestic laborers with the rights stipulated in the International Declaration for Human Rights (right to equality, healthcare, social security, social service, education and rest, freedom of speech and peaceful gathering).
    “Why are we deprived of the minimum wage or from being paid overtime? Why are we deprived of a day off, an annual leave? Or maternity leave?” she asked, adding “how can Lebanon call itself a democratic country while domestic workers are not enjoying such a democracy?”
    “Each one of us believes that domestic work is the job that makes every other job possible. Giving us our rights is just the beginning and then every domestic worker sitting in this hall would feel protected by the law,” Gasto added.

    How can Lebanon call itself a democratic country while domestic workers are not enjoying such a democracy?Frank Hagman, regional VP for Arab states in the ILO, promised the organization would put pressure on its local and international partners in order to provide a safe environment that would organize domestic workers’ rights through an official syndicate acknowledged by the Lebanese authorities.Labor Minister Sejaan Qazi was absent from the ceremony and was instead represented by his advisor Mounir al-Deek, who quoted a social researcher from the 19th century, saying “between the rich and the poor, the strong and the weak, the law is the sole liberator.” He also promised to discuss everything from the meeting, as well as the campaign objectives with officials in the ministry.
    Equal pay for equal work
    Is there a real will to create a new syndicate structure that goes beyond the labor syndicates that sold themselves to capitalists and to the authorities? What are the chances for the syndicate to become a reality? Castro Abdullah, head of the National Union of Workers and Employees Syndicate seemed optimistic in asking such questions involving the rights of the labor class, including the right to work and the right to set a flexible wage scale, developing social security, amending the labor law, ratifying the ranks and salaries system in the public sector, guaranteeing equal pay for equal work, and enhancing work conditions for domestic workers.
    Abdullah stressed on the urgency of these steps, as about 20 percent of Lebanese are suffering from poverty while banks and financial institutions are increasingly controlling the country, and humans are being enslaved by other humans.
     
    Nayla

    Nayla

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    ليست المرة الأولى التي تعمل فيها الفتاة الأثيوبية "بيتي Betty " في لبنان، لكن هذه المرة مختلفة فبعد أقل من أسبوع على بدئها العمل، حصل سوء تفاهم بسيط مع مستخدميها فطلبت التوقف عن العمل وعادت إلى المكتب، وهناك اعتدي عليها

     
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