'Million-Man March' in Baghdad. Iraqi People Rise against the U.S. Occupation.

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When it comes to energy and oil, the US is self sufficient.
Why does the US need to stay in the Middle East and control oil fields in every spot of the World from Iran to Venezuela?
Could the reason simply be the dollarization of world energy (Petrodollar) to protect the fake value of the USD?

Did Trump miss that fact when he ran his Presidential campaigned on pulling out of the "Middle East Endless Wars" as he put it?


'Million-Man March' kicks off in Baghdad to demand US troop pullout

'Million-Man March' kicks off in Baghdad to demand US troop pullout (VIDEO, PHOTOS)

Supporters of Iraqi Shi'ite cleric Moqtada al-Sadr hold a sign reading "Get out of our land before you leave defeated"
© REUTERS/Alaa al-Marjani

A massive demonstration –called for by a prominent Shia cleric– has flooded the streets of the Iraq's capital Baghdad, with thousands voicing their anger at the US military presence there.
Early on Friday morning, throngs of protesters – men and women, young and old – began amassing at al-Hurriya Square in central Baghdad, near the city's main university. The anti-America rally, dubbed the "Million-man March," was called by Moqtada al-Sadr, Iraq's top Shiite cleric.
Some were wearing white robes, symbolizing their readiness to die for a religious cause, while others were pictured holding signs that read:
"To the families of American soldiers – insist on the withdrawal of [your] sons from our country or prepare their coffins!"

RT

"Get out, get out, occupier!" protesters shouted, while others chanted, "Yes to sovereignty!"

Security forces have cordoned off main roads in the capital, and the city's Green Zone – home to foreign embassies and government premises – was barricaded with concrete barriers.

The anti-America demonstration passed off peacefully, as crowds steered clear of both the Green Zone and Tahrir Square, a focal point of anti-government protest in Baghdad.


The march comes just weeks after Iraq was shaken by an American drone strike near Baghdad airport, which killed Iran's top General Qassem Soleimani and Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis, the deputy chief of Iraq's Shia militia, along with other officers.


RT

Trump's picture has also appeared at the rally © REUTERS/Alaa al-Marjani

Aside from triggering a flare-up of military tensions and a retaliatory Iranian strike on US bases in Iraq, the killing sparked outrage among those Iraqis who see the 16-year American troop presence in their country as an unlawful occupation.

Official Baghdad, for its part, blamed Washington for breaching its sovereignty, with the lawmakers of the Islamic republic having passed a non-binding resolution calling on the government to expel all foreign troops from the country.

US media has suggested that the Pentagon was planning the withdrawal of its 5,000 troops from Iraq, but these reports were officially refuted afterwards.

 
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    cry me a river
    Does that concern you?
    Apparently Nataniahu is more than happy to fight till the last US soldier in Iraq?



    34 Troops Have Brain Injuries From Iranian Missile Strike, Pentagon Says34 Troops Have Brain Injuries From Iranian Missile Strike, Pentagon Says
    A Pentagon spokesman said that eight of the affected service members returned to the United States from an American military hospital in Germany.




    American troops surveying the damage to a building at Al Asad Air Base this month in Anbar, Iraq.

    American troops surveying the damage to a building at Al Asad Air Base this month in Anbar, Iraq.Credit...Sergey Ponomarev for The New York Times

    WASHINGTON — The Defense Department said Friday that 34 American service members have traumatic brain injuries from Iranian airstrikes on Al Asad Air Base in Iraq, contradicting President Trump’s dismissal of injuries among American troops this week.

    A Pentagon spokesman, Jonathan Hoffman, told a news conference that eight of the affected service members have returned to the United States from an American military hospital in Germany.

    On Wednesday, Mr. Trump dismissed concussion symptoms felt by the troops as “not very serious,” even as the Pentagon acknowledged that a number of American service members were being studied for possible traumatic brain injury caused by the attack.

    “I heard they had headaches,” Mr. Trump said at a news conference in Davos, Switzerland. “I don’t consider them very serious injuries relative to other injuries I have seen.”

    Senator Jack Reed, Democrat of Rhode Island and his party’s ranking member on the Armed Services Committee, called on Mr. Trump to apologize for belittling the injuries suffered by the troops.

    “It’s plain wrong for President Trump to diminish their wounds,” Mr. Reed, who served as an officer in the 82nd Airborne Division, said in a statement Friday. “He may not have meant to disrespect them, but President Trump’s comments were an insult to our troops. He owes them an apology.”

    The comments of the president, who avoided the Vietnam War draft with a diagnosis of bone spurs, also drew criticism from veterans organizations.

    “Don’t just be outraged by #PresidentMayhem’s latest asinine comments,” Paul Rieckhoff, the founder of Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America, wrote on Twitter the day Mr. Trump spoke in Davos. “Take action to help vets facing TBIs,” meaning traumatic brain injuries.

    Traumatic brain injuries can result from the powerful changes in atmospheric pressure that accompany an explosion like that from a missile warhead.
    The missiles were launched by Iran in retaliation for the killing of a top Iranian general, Qassim Suleimani, by an American drone strike in Baghdad on Jan. 3. The Trump administration at first said that there were no injuries from the Iranian attack on American troops.

    Pentagon and military officials said subsequently that any delay in reporting the injuries was because it took time for the information to work its way up the chain of command to leaders in Washington. Officials also noted that symptoms from brain injuries do not always appear immediately.

    Of the 34 service members who were told they have traumatic brain injuries, 17 were flown by medical evacuation aircraft to Germany. Nine remain in the military hospital there, while the others were flown to the United States.

    One person was taken by medevac to Kuwait. Sixteen service members were treated for traumatic brain injury in Iraq and have returned to duty, officials said.
     
    proIsrael-nonIsraeli

    proIsrael-nonIsraeli

    Legendary Member
    "'Million-Man March' in Baghdad" - how many were there in reality?

    BTW, to punish them we can pull out from Shiastan, but remain in Kurdistan and Sunnistan.
     
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    Hundreds of thousands protest US troop presence in Iraq
    Baghdad, Iraq (CNN)Hundreds of thousands of protesters marched through Baghdad on Friday calling for US troops to leave Iraq, heeding the call of powerful Shia cleric Muqtada al-Sadr who called for a "Million Man March."
    Families and children held aloft signs that read "no, no to America" and "no, no to occupation" amid a sea of Iraqi flags. A heavy security presence surrounded the path of the march, as well as the Green Zone which houses the US embassy.
    The Green Zone has been the site of multiple rocket attacks that have increased in frequency since a US attack in Baghdad killed Iran's most powerful military general, Qasem Soleimani, and the Iran-backed Iraqi commander, Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis.
    The targeted killing on January 3 sparked growing calls for US troops to leave the country, as many Iraqis criticized what they see as a breach of its sovereignty. There are roughly 5,000 US troops in Iraq.
    Women shout slogans at the protest in Baghdad against the US military presence in Iraq.

    Women shout slogans at the protest in Baghdad against the US military presence in Iraq.

    Iraq's parliament voted to expel the US military from the country following the attack, but the Trump administration has said it does not intend to pull troops out.
    At the rally, Sadr reiterated calls for US troops to leave the country in a bid to steer clear of "another war." Iraqi President Barham Salih tweeted an image of the protest. "Iraqis insist on a state with complete sovereignty that will not be breached," tweeted Salih.


    TRUMP Making America GREAT AGAIN

    Protesters step on a makeshift US flag after heeding the call of powerful Shia cleric Muqtada al-Sadr for a "Million Man March."

    Protesters step on a makeshift US flag after heeding the call of powerful Shia cleric Muqtada al-Sadr for a "Million Man March."​

    Protesters carried posters with caricatures of US President Donald Trump. One showed Trump on the back of a tank, his head sticking out of a ballot box, an apparent reference to the upcoming US election.
    Thurgham al-Tamimi arrived at the protests from Karbala with his two children, his wife and his father. "We came here to answer the call of the nation," he told CNN. "Our country is exposed to foreign interference from East and West," an apparent reference to both Iran, which has growing influence in the country, and the United States.
    Hundreds of thousands of Iraqis, waving national flags, take to the streets in central Baghdad on January 24, 2020.

    Hundreds of thousands of Iraqis, waving national flags, take to the streets in central Baghdad on January 24, 2020.

    "We don't want any country to decide the fate of Iraq. We want to see Iraq with full sovereignty," he added.
    Tamimi wore a white shroud over his shoulders. He said it symbolized his willingness to make a "sacrifice" for the sake of the country.
    Some protesters said they also wished to shake off Iran's political influence in the country. "We don't want Iran in Iraq either. We respect them as a neighbor but they should not have a say in Iraq and no one should interfere in our internal affairs," said Um Ahmed, who declined to disclose her full name.
    "No to America, and no to Iran. Iraq is for Iraqis," she added.
    Um Ali wears a shirt with a photograph of Grand Ayatollah Mohammed Sadeq al-Sadr, a Shiite Muslim cleric assassinated during the late Iraqi president Saddam Hussein's rule, and Moqtada Sadr.

    Um Ali wears a shirt with a photograph of Grand Ayatollah Mohammed Sadeq al-Sadr, a Shiite Muslim cleric assassinated during the late Iraqi president Saddam Hussein's rule, and Moqtada Sadr.

    Iraqis whom CNN spoke to in recent weeks criticized Trump's targeted killing of Soleimani, and said they feared becoming caught in the middle of a war between the US and Iran. Many across Iraq's political divide have called on their government to avoid turning the country into a "battleground state."
    Iran responded to the US targeted killing by firing more than a dozen ballistic missiles at US positions in Iraq, leading some US troops to be treated for concussions. At al-Asad base, which bore the bulk of the attack, US troops received advance warning, and most had already taken cover in bunkers when the missiles struck.
    Iraq has also been mired in an internal political crisis, with thousands of anti-government protesters taking to the streets. The demonstrators have protested against corruption perceived as widespread, and object to Iran's growing influence in the country.
     
    Rafidi

    Rafidi

    Legendary Member
    "'Million-Man March' in Baghdad" - how many were there in reality?

    BTW, to punish them we can pull out from Shiastan, but remain in Kurdistan and Sunnistan.
    You're asked to leave Iraq. Iraq is not your country to divide into bits and pieces.

    If you start that game, you will open a Pandora box in the region. If you divide Iraq, then Saudi should also be divided along sectarian lines. The oil in Eastern Saudi Arabia belongs to the Shia. The Saudi regime can transport fake populations and play with demographics. But everyone knows where his father came from in the end.
     
    HannaTheCrusader

    HannaTheCrusader

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    Orange Room Supporter

    Hundreds of thousands protest US troop presence in Iraq
    Baghdad, Iraq (CNN)Hundreds of thousands of protesters marched through Baghdad on Friday calling for US troops to leave Iraq, heeding the call of powerful Shia cleric Muqtada al-Sadr who called for a "Million Man March."
    Families and children held aloft signs that read "no, no to America" and "no, no to occupation" amid a sea of Iraqi flags. A heavy security presence surrounded the path of the march, as well as the Green Zone which houses the US embassy.
    The Green Zone has been the site of multiple rocket attacks that have increased in frequency since a US attack in Baghdad killed Iran's most powerful military general, Qasem Soleimani, and the Iran-backed Iraqi commander, Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis.
    The targeted killing on January 3 sparked growing calls for US troops to leave the country, as many Iraqis criticized what they see as a breach of its sovereignty. There are roughly 5,000 US troops in Iraq.
    Women shout slogans at the protest in Baghdad against the US military presence in Iraq.

    Women shout slogans at the protest in Baghdad against the US military presence in Iraq.

    Iraq's parliament voted to expel the US military from the country following the attack, but the Trump administration has said it does not intend to pull troops out.
    At the rally, Sadr reiterated calls for US troops to leave the country in a bid to steer clear of "another war." Iraqi President Barham Salih tweeted an image of the protest. "Iraqis insist on a state with complete sovereignty that will not be breached," tweeted Salih.


    TRUMP Making America GREAT AGAIN

    Protesters step on a makeshift US flag after heeding the call of powerful Shia cleric Muqtada al-Sadr for a Million Man March.

    Protesters step on a makeshift US flag after heeding the call of powerful Shia cleric Muqtada al-Sadr for a "Million Man March."​

    Protesters carried posters with caricatures of US President Donald Trump. One showed Trump on the back of a tank, his head sticking out of a ballot box, an apparent reference to the upcoming US election.
    Thurgham al-Tamimi arrived at the protests from Karbala with his two children, his wife and his father. "We came here to answer the call of the nation," he told CNN. "Our country is exposed to foreign interference from East and West," an apparent reference to both Iran, which has growing influence in the country, and the United States.
    Hundreds of thousands of Iraqis, waving national flags, take to the streets in central Baghdad on January 24, 2020.

    Hundreds of thousands of Iraqis, waving national flags, take to the streets in central Baghdad on January 24, 2020.

    "We don't want any country to decide the fate of Iraq. We want to see Iraq with full sovereignty," he added.
    Tamimi wore a white shroud over his shoulders. He said it symbolized his willingness to make a "sacrifice" for the sake of the country.
    Some protesters said they also wished to shake off Iran's political influence in the country. "We don't want Iran in Iraq either. We respect them as a neighbor but they should not have a say in Iraq and no one should interfere in our internal affairs," said Um Ahmed, who declined to disclose her full name.
    "No to America, and no to Iran. Iraq is for Iraqis," she added.
    Um Ali wears a shirt with a photograph of Grand Ayatollah Mohammed Sadeq al-Sadr, a Shiite Muslim cleric assassinated during the late Iraqi president Saddam Hussein's rule, and Moqtada Sadr.

    Um Ali wears a shirt with a photograph of Grand Ayatollah Mohammed Sadeq al-Sadr, a Shiite Muslim cleric assassinated during the late Iraqi president Saddam Hussein's rule, and Moqtada Sadr.

    Iraqis whom CNN spoke to in recent weeks criticized Trump's targeted killing of Soleimani, and said they feared becoming caught in the middle of a war between the US and Iran. Many across Iraq's political divide have called on their government to avoid turning the country into a "battleground state."
    Iran responded to the US targeted killing by firing more than a dozen ballistic missiles at US positions in Iraq, leading some US troops to be treated for concussions. At al-Asad base, which bore the bulk of the attack, US troops received advance warning, and most had already taken cover in bunkers when the missiles struck.
    Iraq has also been mired in an internal political crisis, with thousands of anti-government protesters taking to the streets. The demonstrators have protested against corruption perceived as widespread, and object to Iran's growing influence in the country.

    it was a big one
    the usual dmos size in iraq

    but not the one they hyped for weeks

    7irak al shia had more if not same when they did tehir own against iran

    clearly not a majorty of iraqis wants usa out

    shia re split half
    sunni all pro usa
    kuds same

    so i can safely say 70% of so of iraqis wants USA TO STAY
    AND THEY WILL STAY
    mainly in friendly regions
     
    NewLeb

    NewLeb

    New Member
    They’re supporters of Mr. Sadr. Nothing to see here, folks....
     
    proIsrael-nonIsraeli

    proIsrael-nonIsraeli

    Legendary Member
    You're asked to leave Iraq. Iraq is not your country to divide into bits and pieces.

    If you start that game, you will open a Pandora box in the region. If you divide Iraq, then Saudi should also be divided along sectarian lines. The oil in Eastern Saudi Arabia belongs to the Shia. The Saudi regime can transport fake populations and play with demographics. But everyone knows where his father came from in the end.
    I am not asked to leave Iraq by Iraqi people.
    I am asked to leave Iraq by and to Iran and it will not happen as long as Iran is what it is today.
    So, here is the compromise - we will leave Shiastan.
     
    NiceV

    NiceV

    Well-Known Member
    I am not asked to leave Iraq by Iraqi people.
    I am asked to leave Iraq by and to Iran and it will not happen as long as Iran is what it is today.
    So, here is compromise - we will leave Shiastan.
    Also as the Crusader in Chief said they must reimburse the money spent in Iraq by USA 🇮🇶
     
    proIsrael-nonIsraeli

    proIsrael-nonIsraeli

    Legendary Member
    Also as the Crusader in Chief said they must reimburse the money spent in Iraq by USA 🇮🇶
    I do not expect it to happen and neither does Trump, but it's good pretext to tell Iraqi Shia to go pound sand.
     
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    Pope backs Iraqi call for its sovereignty to be respected

    1580019653560.png

    VATICAN CITY (Reuters) - Pope Francis met Iraq’s president on Saturday and the two agreed that the country’s sovereignty must be respected, following attacks on Iraqi territory this month by the United States and Iran.

    President Barham Salih held private talks for about 30 minutes with the pope and then met the Vatican’s two top diplomats, Secretary of State Cardinal Pietro Parolin and Archbishop Paul Gallagher, its foreign minister.

    The talks “focused on the challenges the country currently faces and on the importance of promoting stability and the reconstruction process, encouraging the path of dialogue and the search for suitable solutions in favor of citizens and with respect for national sovereignty,” a Vatican statement said.

    On Jan. 8, Iranian forces fired missiles at two military bases in Iraq housing U.S. troops in retaliation for Washington’s killing of Iranian General Qassem Soleimani in a drone strike a Baghdad airport on Jan. 3.

    The Iraqi parliament has passed a resolution ordering the 5,000 U.S. troops stationed in Iraq to leave the country.

    Soon after the Iranian attack, Francis urged the United States and Iran to avoid escalation and pursue “dialogue and self-restraint” to avert a wider conflict in the Middle East.

    The pope discussed the Middle East with U.S. Vice President Mike Pence on Friday.

    The recent tensions in Iraq could make it impossible for Francis to visit the country, which he has said he would like to do this year.

    The Vatican said the pope and Salih also discussed “the importance of preserving the historical presence of Christians in the country”.

    The Christian presence in Iraq and some other countries in the Middle East has been depleted by wars and conflicts.

    Iraq’s several hundred thousand Christians suffered particular hardships when Islamic State controlled large parts of the country, but have recovered freedoms since the jihadists were pushed out.

    1580019885070.png
     
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