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Gives Hope Nadine Labaki’s Capernaum - serious contender for the Cannes 2018 Palme d’or

walidos

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
#1
And some are even saying bestbforeign language movie Oscar! She got a 15 minutes standing ovation after the screening of Capernaum in Cannes...

Amazing!

Nadine Labaki’s ‘Capernaum’ Earns Massive Cannes Standing Ovation and Instant Palme d’Or Winner Predictions

With only a couple days left before the Cannes jury announces this year’s prizewinners, the festival may have saved the biggest Palme d’Or contender for the end. “Capernaum,” the new drama from Lebanese director Nadine Labaki, earned a massive 15-minute standing ovation following its May 17 premiere at the festival, according to the glowing first reactions. Numerous members of the press reacted strongly to the film on Twitter following the screening, with many predicting “Capernaum” walks home with the Palme d’Or.

READ MORE:
Cannes: Sony Pictures Classics Buys Nadine Labaki’s ‘Capernaum’ In Advance of Competition Premiere
Cannes: Sony Pictures Classics Buys Nadine Labaki’s ‘Capernaum’ In Advance of Competition Premiere
“Capernaum” is billed as a “politically-charged fable” that follows a child who sues his own family. The movie is notable for being one of only three films directed by women to compete for the Palme d’Or at this year’s festival. If Labaki ends up winning Cannes’ top honor on Saturday, she will become only the second female director to win the prize following Jane Campion for “The Piano.” Actresses Lea Seydoux and Adèle Exarchopoulos shared the Palme d’or with director Abdellatif Kechiche for “Blue Is the Warmest Color.”

Sony Pictures Classics purchased North American and Latin American distribution rights to “Capernaum” before the Cannes Film Festival even started, an early sign of confidence for the drama. The deal was estimated to cost $1.3 million. The distributor is expected to campaign the movie for next year’s best foreign language Oscar.


Labaki is a Cannes regular, but “Capernaum” is the first time she’s competed for the Palme d’Or. The filmmaker was part of Directors’ Fortnight in 2007 with “Caramel” and premiered “Where Do We Go Now?” in the Un Certain Regard section in 2011. The latter received an Ecumenical Special Mentions prize.

Check out first reactions to “Capernaum” below.

Nadine Labaki’s Capernaum just got a solid 15 minute standing ovation. No exaggeration. #Cannes2018

— Tatiana Siegel (@TatianaSiegel27) May 17, 2018
Capharnaüm – Jaw. Drop. This is phenomenal, the most powerful film I’ve seen at #cannes2018 this year. Nadine Labaki has made a knock out; a film about abuse of children, challenging us to rethink how we can build a better society for all. Wow.


— Alex Billington (@firstshowing) May 17, 2018
#cannes2018 Avec #Capharnaüm Nadine Labaki frappe un grand coup en cette fin de festival. Cette histoire de gamin qui essaie de sauver sa peau est d’une humanité saisissante. Un kid des temps modernes. Il sera au palmarès samedi soir. 🤞 pic.twitter.com/wXvMD0Tdz9

— Mathieu Charrier (@MaTCharrier) May 17, 2018
Nadine Labaki’s sensational Capernaum turns a street kid’s struggle into a kind of social-realist blockbuster. Middle hour is so crazily ambitious I’m not clear how she pulled it off: watch this win the Palme on Saturday, maybe the foreign language Oscar next. #Cannes2018

— Robbie Collin (@robbiereviews) May 17, 2018
Just got out of CAPHARNAUM directed by Nadine Labaki. Gutted. This will won the Palm D’ore. @Festival_Cannes


— Michelle Morgan (@MichelleMorgan_) May 17, 2018
Clapping still roaring at GTL for #NadineLabaki and her exceptional movie #Capharnoüm #cannes2018 over 10 minutes now!!! pic.twitter.com/2Tjb8xzkde

— Radek Folta (@rdfolta) May 17, 2018
#CAPHARNAÜM wins the Palme d’Baby at #Cannes2018. Amazing baby performance.

— erickohn (@erickohn) May 17, 2018
L’inépuisable standing ovation à l’issue de la projection du film #Capharnaüm réalisé par Nadine Labaki, présenté en sélection officielle à Cannes 👏

🎬⭐📺 Vivez #Cannes2018 #FestivaldeCannes2018 sur @canalplus 👉 Festival de Cannes 2018 pic.twitter.com/GiXHMcaAut

— cinemacanalplus (@cinemacanalplus) May 17, 2018
Nadine Labaki’s “Capharnaum,” a portrait of extreme poverty, despair, anger and resilience in the case of a young Lebanese boy, is masterful. Zero story tension but it may be the saddest film I’ve ever seen. I kept thinking back to late ’40s Italian neo-realism. Devastating.

— Hollywood Elsewhere (@wellshwood) May 17, 2018
Nadine Labaki’s CAPHARNAUM sure ain’t subtle, but it hits *hard*. At times deeply flaws, at others staggeringly sad. I’ll be shocked if this doesn’t win the Palme! #Cannes2018

— James McAllister (@jamesmca90) May 17, 2018
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Nadine Labaki’s ‘Capernaum’ Earns Massive Cannes Standing Ovation and Instant Palme d’Or Winner Predictions

Edit: title should read 2018!
 

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  • manifesto

    Well-Known Member
    #4
    I was going to post the same article but you beat me to it!

    The kid's reaction is priceless.
    Bas bikhsous el zalghouta? Walaw? Shu mfakra 7ala Nadine bil day3a? :oops:
     

    My Moria Moon

    Legendary Member
    Staff member
    #6
    I was going to post the same article but you beat me to it!

    The kid's reaction is priceless.
    Bas bikhsous el zalghouta? Walaw? Shu mfakra 7ala Nadine bil day3a? :oops:
    I'm surprised people did not run and hide when that horrifying zaghlouta came, because I usually do. Amazing how the ancient Hittites culture still runs in our blood, and suddenly erupts bel afra7 w bel atra7, no matter where we are.

    Because originally, it is said that the zaghlouta was exhibited by trained Hittite cryers who were paraded before war prisoners, to mock and intimidate them, before they were publicly tortured and executed.
     

    SeaAb

    Well-Known Member
    Staff member
    #9
    When i read this post I thought to myself 'malla takhaluf - we're actually sharing a country with such people?' but then i remembered that similar language is also being used on the forum! :rolleyes:
    DddYmJRXUAIxvDv.jpg
     

    loubnaniTO

    Legendary Member
    Staff member
    Super Penguin
    #10
    I didn't find a trailer, I found a very short clip that made me tear up though so here:


    Nevermind this might be about the standing ovation lol I found this:

    bisharrif


    When i read this post I thought to myself 'malla takhaluf - we're actually sharing a country with such people?' but then i remembered that similar language is also being used on the forum! :rolleyes:
    DddYmJRXUAIxvDv.jpg
    ma bisharrif
     

    spacecreature

    Well-Known Member
    #13
    It would be cool if she wins....and she probably will coz people are suckers for emotional peices with a "message" (I personally hate such movies!) . And she would deserve it coz she is very talented and has worked hard for years, plus I am sure it is well executed like her previous movies.

    Our cinema is either too serious, dealing with wars/ melodrama or completely commercial and cheap a la bebe, no middle ground it seems.

    PS: She is as pretty in real, and very sweet.
     

    Muki

    Well-Known Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    #14
    I'm surprised people did not run and hide when that horrifying zaghlouta came, because I usually do. Amazing how the ancient Hittites culture still runs in our blood, and suddenly erupts bel afra7 w bel atra7, no matter where we are.

    Because originally, it is said that the zaghlouta was exhibited by trained Hittite cryers who were paraded before war prisoners, to mock and intimidate them, before they were publicly tortured and executed.
    Makes sense, they parade the bride and groom on their wedding and chant zalagheet, prior to their torture for the rest of their lives.
     

    manifesto

    Well-Known Member
    #16
    It would be cool if she wins....and she probably will coz people are suckers for emotional peices with a "message" (I personally hate such movies!) . And she would deserve it coz she is very talented and has worked hard for years, plus I am sure it is well executed like her previous movies.

    Our cinema is either too serious, dealing with wars/ melodrama or completely commercial and cheap a la bebe, no middle ground it seems.

    PS: She is as pretty in real, and very sweet.
    You spoke my mind!
    As soon as I read the ridiculous synopsis (a kid decides to sue his parents for having him), I thought to myself "Yawn, a typical Cannes-bait".
    The "I'm a humanitarian director exposing poverty in the Middle East, hand me an award"-kind of film.

    Mehhhhhh Cannes has stopped being relevant anyway.
     

    walidos

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    #17
    Come
    You spoke my mind!
    As soon as I read the ridiculous synopsis (a kid decides to sue his parents for having him), I thought to myself "Yawn, a typical Cannes-bait".
    The "I'm a humanitarian director exposing poverty in the Middle East, hand me an award"-kind of film.

    Mehhhhhh Cannes has stopped being relevant anyway.
    Oh come on! This industry is cut throat! Competition is ruthless and truth be told, talent is not scarce. The budgets for movies in the Middle East, and lebanon particularly, are really low... to achieve such high standards is a feat on its own. To be considered for the palme d’or, and an Oscar front runner by western critics is amazing... something to be proud of
     

    manifesto

    Well-Known Member
    #18
    Come


    Oh come on! This industry is cut throat! Competition is ruthless and truth be told, talent is not scarce. The budgets for movies in the Middle East, and lebanon particularly, are really low... to achieve such high standards is a feat on its own. To be considered for the palme d’or, and an Oscar front runner by western critics is amazing... something to be proud of
    There's no doubt that she has talent as a director and I'd be happy to see her nab the Palme d'Or, but I've always found her films' screenwriting clunky and reeking of cheap sentimentalism.
    Her latest effort is a clear humanistic Cannes-bait that's intended to make the Cannes jury feel bad for us and indulge in mutual back-patting for nominating a movie that sends a strong message to the world:
    • Syrian refugee - Check
    • Poverty - Check
    • Humanistic message - Check
    • The backdrop of a squalid Middle Eastern city - Check
    People will keep associating Beirut with war and poverty if our directors insist on showing this side of our city.

    Massive yawn! But congratulations if she makes it. I still appreciate the cinematography behind her films.