Protests over Pay Cuts of Sevicemen and Govt Workers

Rachel Corrie

Rachel Corrie

Legendary Member
There was protest at the city center today, in Beirut over proposed pay cuts of servicemen, retired servicemen and govt workers. The highway to the south was also blocked at Naameh and Ghaziyyeh. Tyres were burnt in Beirut and traffic was terrible.

It seems unimportant for this development to be raised on the forum or for it to be discussed in a thread of its own. Does this indicate something? That the cuts are supported by the FPM? Who really made such proposal? Hezballah and Amal have already voiced their opposition to any cuts that will target fixed income earners and the poor and instead urged the govt to look for ways to stop the leakages, wasteful expenditures and recover loot from those who have and are still milking the state and the people.
 
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    lebanese1

    Legendary Member
    Hezballah and Amal have already voiced their opposition to any cuts that will target fixed income earners and the poor and instead urged the govt to look for ways to stop the leakages, wasteful expenditures and recover loot from those who have and are still milking the state and the people.
    great. i suggest that berri starts by giving back all the money he looted over the past 30 years.
     
    Rachel Corrie

    Rachel Corrie

    Legendary Member
    great. i suggest that berri starts by giving back all the money he looted over the past 30 years.
    Lol

    So if berri doesn't give back all the supposed money he looted, it means the solution lies in cutting the livelihood of those who have served the country.

    The straw-man will be Berri is corrupt so let us choke the people. Please don't go off topic.
     
    Rachel Corrie

    Rachel Corrie

    Legendary Member
    Fearing Austerity, Lebanese Protest ahead of Budget

    Tuesday, 16 April, 2019 - 17:45

    Asharq Al-Awsat
    The Lebanese government has yet to disclose its budget for 2019 but protesters are already in the streets fearing the “difficult and painful” reforms it is expected to announce as it tries to get spending in control and rein in public debt.

    Retired army officers blocked several highways with burning tires on Tuesday, a preemptive warning to the government against any cuts to their pensions that might be part of its effort to reduce one of the world’s heaviest public debt burdens.

    Though small, the protests offered a glimpse of the political minefield facing the government.

    The budget is seen as a critical test of its will to enact long-stalled reforms that economists say are more pressing than ever for an economy that has suffered years of low growth. State finances are strained by a bloated public sector, high debt servicing costs and hefty subsidizes spent on the power sector.

    “We went out today to tell them that our pensions are a red line,” said Khaled Ammar, one of a number of retired officers blocking the highway south of Beirut.

    The budget has yet to be finalized but speculation it will include cuts to the massive public wage bill has grown since Foreign Minister Jebran Bassil hinted at such steps on Saturday.

    “There are those who should be making people aware today that if a temporary reduction doesn’t happen, then there will be no salaries for anyone,” he wrote on Twitter, adding that “if we must start with the ministers and MPs, so be it”.

    Protesters said tackling corruption should be the priority, reported Reuters.

    “If the economic condition of the country has reached this difficult level ... we are not responsible for it, the politicians are,” said Ammar, a father of three who served in the military for three decades.

    Lebanese leaders have been warning of economic crisis for some time. In a February policy statement, the new government committed itself to launching fast and effective reforms that could be “difficult and painful” to avoid a worsening of economic, financial and social conditions.

    Prime Minister Saad Hariri said last week he was concerned about a Greek-style crisis in Lebanon while saying that government measures would prevent “economic problems”.

    At a Paris conference last year, Lebanon promised to cut its budget deficit by 1 percent of gross domestic product a year over five years. Economists are now looking for a bigger cut because last year’s deficit was bigger than expected at between 10-1/2 to 11 percent of GDP instead of a projected 8.2 percent.

    Serious reforms would help Lebanon unlock some $11 billion in financing pledged in Paris.

    The government last week approved a plan to overhaul the power sector - a major drain on state finances for years. Critics say the government must deliver this time, pointing to previous such plans that were never implemented.

    The public sector wage bill is the state’s biggest outgoing, followed by servicing the public debt equal to around 150 percent of GDP. The wage bill went up in 2017 after increases were agreed ahead of a parliamentary election.

    Nassib Ghobril, chief economist at Lebanon’s Byblos Bank, hopes to see the deficit brought down by 2 percent of GDP and says reforms should include shutting down the many obsolete government agencies.

    “They have to freeze hiring, freeze future salary increases, and increases in benefits, and they have to cut the number of public sector employees and restructure the way companies restructure when they are in financial difficulties,” he said, according to Reuters.

    “The public sector has recruited 31,000 people over the last four years - more than the entire financial sector.”

     
    Rachel Corrie

    Rachel Corrie

    Legendary Member
    So its the brainchild of Gebran Bassil to have the salaries of govt employees tampered with. He is playing with fire literally and trying to set the country on fire. He should cut down on his own expenses and trips, like the one he embarked on to Brazil for the olympic games and if my memory isn't failing me, to Russia for the world cup. You're talking about the livelihood of people whose earning is fixed and do not live in castles nor own private jets.

    It looks the govt will soon collapse and bye bye Cedar!! They want to borrow to steal and then use the people to suffer for their excesses.
     
    Iron Maiden

    Iron Maiden

    Paragon of Bacon
    Staff member
    There was protest at the city center today, in Beirut over proposed pay cuts of servicemen, retired servicemen and govt workers. The highway to the south was also blocked at Naameh and Ghaziyyeh. Tyres were burnt in Beirut and traffic was terrible.

    It seems unimportant for this development to be raised on the forum or for it to be discussed in a thread of its own. Does this indicate something? That the cuts are supported by the FPM? Who really made such proposal? Hezballah and Amal have already voiced their opposition to any cuts that will target fixed income earners and the poor and instead urged the govt to look for ways to stop the leakages, wasteful expenditures and recover loot from those who have and are still milking the state and the people.
    Eltelle amal MPs are wary over their clientelle gettimg pay cuts? :lol:
     
    walidos

    walidos

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    There was protest at the city center today, in Beirut over proposed pay cuts of servicemen, retired servicemen and govt workers. The highway to the south was also blocked at Naameh and Ghaziyyeh. Tyres were burnt in Beirut and traffic was terrible.

    It seems unimportant for this development to be raised on the forum or for it to be discussed in a thread of its own. Does this indicate something? That the cuts are supported by the FPM? Who really made such proposal? Hezballah and Amal have already voiced their opposition to any cuts that will target fixed income earners and the poor and instead urged the govt to look for ways to stop the leakages, wasteful expenditures and recover loot from those who have and are still milking the state and the people.
    It is unfortunate, but a reality: if the country goes bankrupt, they will lose most everything they are earning now, them and everybody else for that matter...
    I feel with these people but they don’t realise the gravity of the situation. Amal and HA supporting them is irresponsible.
    FPM and Future asking for austerity measures is the right thing, but this needs to affect everyone from the president down. It also must come with a full set of spending restrictions... net we need a full and complete plan, like they did for the electricity sector
     
    Rachel Corrie

    Rachel Corrie

    Legendary Member
    Eltelle amal MPs are wary over their clientelle gettimg pay cuts? :lol:
    Their clientele are Lebanese citizens. They're not hired mercenaries from Mars.

    We may need to ban the use of foreign domestic workers by the rich. How many billions of dollars in remittances is leaving Lebanon annually? Let the rich pay for the debts. Otherwise, revolution will be inevitable in Lebanon. It will start with the collapse of the new govt that took almost a year to form.

    There was pin drop silence on the forum because it was a Bassil tweet that stirred protests in Beirut.
     
    Last edited:
    Rachel Corrie

    Rachel Corrie

    Legendary Member
    It is unfortunate, but a reality: if the country goes bankrupt, they will lose most everything they are earning now, them and everybody else for that matter...
    I feel with these people but they don’t realise the gravity of the situation. Amal and HA supporting them is irresponsible.
    FPM and Future asking for austerity measures is the right thing, but this needs to affect everyone from the president down. It also must come with a full set of spending restrictions... net we need a full and complete plan, like they did for the electricity sector
    When you speak of austerity measures, one would think we were having an extravagant life as citizens of Lebanon. Our normal lives is already austere enough. The only thing that remains is to make Lebanese hungry and transform Lebanon into a sub-saharan country with majority living below the poverty line. The country will burn and the rich will flee. When the rich, the thieving politicians and the looters speak of austerity, there's need to get those bastards burnt at stake. They're behaving like witches. Was it not days so the govt was contemplating on tax waver for Med Bank, owned by the Hariri family?

    Protests should head to the houses of those spearheading the cuts and austerity. Blocking roads of ordinary citizens is not the solution.
     
    Rachel Corrie

    Rachel Corrie

    Legendary Member
    Several measures can be undertaken, aside from targeting the poor:

    - ban or tax heavily the use of foreign domestic workers to prevent remittances leaving Lebanon
    - place heavy taxes on imported goods
    - ban or place heavy taxes on the importation of fancy cars and the use of fancy yatchs and private jets
    - cut on international transfers and prevent hard currencies leaving Lebanese banks or place a limit
    - recover stolen funds and confiscate the monies of politicians.

    If we are truly poor, we don't need the above.
     
    Muki

    Muki

    Well-Known Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Fire the useless "public servants" who go to work ta ymiddo ejreyon. That is if they went to work in the first place.

    Berri's thugs at the forefront. Every single ministry should be evaluating the work of these "public servants" and getting rid of anyone who is not doing a proper job.
     
    walidos

    walidos

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    When you speak of austerity measures, one would think we were having an extravagant life as citizens of Lebanon. Our normal lives is already austere enough. The only thing that remains is to make Lebanese hungry and transform Lebanon into a sub-saharan country with majority living below the poverty line. The country will burn and the rich will flee. When the rich, the thieving politicians and the looters speak of austerity, there's need to get those bastards burnt at stake. They're behaving like witches. Was it not days so the govt was contemplating on tax waver for Med Bank, owned by the Hariri family?

    Protests should head to the houses of those spearheading the cuts and austerity. Blocking roads of ordinary citizens is not the solution.
    If the country goes bankrupt, nothing will save these poorer people, so any plan to avoid bankruptcy is actually helping them. That being said, yes there are plenty of things that can be done, whether or not it would be sufficient without a salary scale back I don’t know.
     
    Rachel Corrie

    Rachel Corrie

    Legendary Member
    If the country goes bankrupt, nothing will save these poorer people, so any plan to avoid bankruptcy is actually helping them. That being said, yes there are plenty of things that can be done, whether or not it would be sufficient without a salary scale back I don’t know.
    What of abolishing salaries for retired MPs?

    There are many measures that can be taken without throwing more Lebanese into poverty and hunger. But it seems the act is deliberate. It is aimed at making the common Lebanese feel more pressure and make Lebanon unlivable for them. Such measure will throw the country into political upheaval and maybe more.
     
    walidos

    walidos

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    Several measures can be undertaken, aside from targeting the poor:

    - ban or tax heavily the use of foreign domestic workers to prevent remittances leaving Lebanon
    - place heavy taxes on imported goods
    - ban or place heavy taxes on the importation of fancy cars and the use of fancy yatchs and private jets
    - cut on international transfers and prevent hard currencies leaving Lebanese banks or place a limit
    - recover stolen funds and confiscate the monies of politicians.

    If we are truly poor, we don't need the above.
    If we touch money transfers and currency we are goners... taxing corporations is useless as these same people you are trying to protect would be affected: make no mistake, every business would pass the taxes to the consumers one way or another...

    There are other measures of course, that work, like recovering stolen funds (though good luck) and stopping payments to employees bil 2ism (never show up to work). Also cutting the salaries of MPs, former MPs, presidents etc... fi other ways of course, plenty, but I don’t know if it would be sufficient.

    Recall when they passed the ritab and rawetib, I was dead against, and unfortunately I was right... we can’t afford it, so it is normal to roll back part of it
     
    walidos

    walidos

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    What of abolishing salaries for retired MPs?

    There are many measures that can be taken without throwing more Lebanese into poverty and hunger. But it seems the act is deliberate. It is aimed at making the common Lebanese feel more pressure and make Lebanon unlivable for them. Such measure will throw the country into political upheaval and maybe more.
    Yes see my previous post... I agree. But I don’t know if sufficient. I am not privy to the numbers. It is the minister of finance that needs to tell us... as well as propose solutions!
     
    JustLeb

    JustLeb

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    There was protest at the city center today, in Beirut over proposed pay cuts of servicemen, retired servicemen and govt workers. The highway to the south was also blocked at Naameh and Ghaziyyeh. Tyres were burnt in Beirut and traffic was terrible.

    It seems unimportant for this development to be raised on the forum or for it to be discussed in a thread of its own. Does this indicate something? That the cuts are supported by the FPM? Who really made such proposal? Hezballah and Amal have already voiced their opposition to any cuts that will target fixed income earners and the poor and instead urged the govt to look for ways to stop the leakages, wasteful expenditures and recover loot from those who have and are still milking the state and the people.
    Doesn't this go against silsilat el routab wel rawateb ?
     
    Abou Sandal

    Abou Sandal

    Legendary Member
    Orange Room Supporter
    If you fire some 80 percent of government employees, only a handful of them will go back home.
     
    D

    Deleted member 73465

    Guest
    So its the brainchild of Gebran Bassil to have the salaries of govt employees tampered with. He is playing with fire literally and trying to set the country on fire. He should cut down on his own expenses and trips, like the one he embarked on to Brazil for the olympic games and if my memory isn't failing me, to Russia for the world cup. You're talking about the livelihood of people whose earning is fixed and do not live in castles nor own private jets.

    It looks the govt will soon collapse and bye bye Cedar!! They want to borrow to steal and then use the people to suffer for their excesses.
    Why giving civil servants who work 4 to 5 hours a retirement from their 50s worth more than a salary of a professional in his 30s working in private sector?
    Let them work more , produce more at work and retire like the others on their 60s
     
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