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Qatar 2022.

Venom

Legendary Member
Qatar could lose 2022 World Cup

Blatter, who is standing for re-election, has conceded that there is considerable public opposition to the decision to host the 2022 World Cup in Qatar - and although he stressed that the notion of a repeat of the decisive vote is "alarming", he did not rule out the prospect.

Qatar won the right to host the tournament last December after outspending their rival bidders, paying out £27 million on communications alone in one year.

Blatter has said that a Fifa inquiry into persistent claims of corruption during the bidding process could lead to the executive committee (ExCo) making the unprecedented move of re-running the vote.

Blatter knows that such a move would be hugely controversial, but the 75 year-old refused to put any limit on the measures which could be taken if the outcome of Fifa's investigation should support the corruption claims.

The key allegation, according to evidence shown to a Parliamentary Committee by The Sunday Times, is that ExCo members Issa Hayatou and Jacques Anouma took bribes of $1.5m each to vote for Qatar.

Blatter said the notion that the 2022 vote would be re-held was "alarming" but conceded that the idea had considerable popular support and is "circulating around the world".

He said: "But don't ask me now yes or no, let us go step by step. It's like we are in an ordinary court and in an ordinary court we cannot ask: 'If, if, if'."

If The Sunday Times' allegations are proved right then among those implicated will be Mohamed bin Hammam, the president of the Asian football confederation, who is running against Blatter for Fifa's presidency.

Fifa has agreed for The Sunday Times' whistle-blower, who disclosed the alleged bribes paid to the two ExCo members, to come to Zurich to give evidence in person to Fifa's own investigation.
 

ecce homo

Well-Known Member
Qatar 2022 World Cup organizers accused of using ‘slave labor’ for less than $1 per hour

Sharan Burrow, General Secretary of the International Trade Union Confederation ITUC:"Qatar is a slave state. To build the infrastructure, more workers will die probably as the 736 footballers, which stand at the world championships on the grass."

Until Sunday (31 March), the Trade Union by the World Cup organisers required to establish new rules for better working conditions.

The foreign workers (mostly from Nepal and Philippines) get a pittance of less than one euro per hour (78 cents), dwell in too tight rooms, partly at 50 degrees without working air conditioning. Often, they cannot leave Qatar as the employer have declined the passports to them.

The trade unionists urge FIFA to reverse the award to Qatar and to rewrite the World Cup .

ITUC communications director Tim Noonan yesterday to picture: "despite the promises Qatar has not budged. We will start a global campaign in the next few weeks, to exert pressure on FIFA. About the national football associations as well as directly to the FIFA headquarters in Zurich. We are talking life and death for many people."

(Microsoft Translator, the article is in German)



http://www.bild.de/sport/fussball/wm/arbeiter-werden-wie-sklaven-behandelt-29673610.bild.html
 

ecce homo

Well-Known Member
Blatter admits politics swayed Qatar World Cup award

AFP - FIFA president Sepp Blatter has admitted that the choice of Qatar as 2022 World Cup hosts was partly influenced by political and economic interests.

"Yes, there was definitely direct political influence," Blatter told Thursday's edition of German weekly Die Zeit, Blatter.

"European leaders recommended to its voting members to opt for Qatar, because of major economic interests in the country."

He made the admission when asked if Qatar had been chosen by world football's governing body FIFA based on considerations other than sport.

While rumours of corruption still circulate around FIFA's decision in 2010 to award the 2022 tournament to the Arab state, Blatter said: "We have just set up a new, independent ethics commission to re-examine the awarding of the World Cup to Qatar".
 

ecce homo

Well-Known Member
Australian federation asks FIFA for World Cup bid compensation as Qatar 2022 mulls winter move

As FIFA edges towards a momentous decision to move the 2022 World Cup to wintertime to dodge Qatar's scalding summer heat, one of Australian soccer's most powerful figures has challenged the sport's governing body to refund the millions of dollars his nation spent on its failed 2022 bid.

Frank Lowy, the billionaire shopping-mall magnate who serves as chairman of Football Federation Australia, made waves across the globe on Monday as he urged FIFA to repay Australia and the rest of the unsuccessful bidders for 2022 in light of the event's potential schedule change.

“Australia, like the other bidding nations, was required by FIFA’s own rules to pitch for a World Cup in the June and July window,” said Lowy in a statement released by FFA. “Changing the dates is tantamount to changing the rules after the contest is over. If that happens, compensation should be paid to those nations that invested many millions, and national prestige, in bidding for a summer event.”

According to a report on FoxSports Australia, the Australian 2022 bid spent A$43 million – about $40 million in US currency – but finished fifth in the final vote behind Qatar, the United States, South Korea and Japan. The entire process is currently under investigation by FIFA's ethics committee.

FIFA general secretary Jerome Valcke has already said FIFA wouldn't be inclined to reimburse Australia, or any of the other losing bids, according to several reports.

FIFA's Executive Committee is set to gather next month to discuss president Sepp Blatter's recommendation that Qatar 2022 be moved to a November to January window in order to avoid the desert nation's triple-digit summer temperatures. It's a controversial idea which has many leagues, broadcasters and federations up in arms.

“FIFA has an opportunity now to make the best of a bad situation by embarking on a transparent and orderly approach, unlike the process that led to the original flawed decision in December 2010,” Lowy added. “Better to let the independent investigative process run its natural course and then, with those issues settled, make a clear-eyed assessment about rescheduling and its consequences.

“FIFA champions the notion of ‘Fair Play’ and that principle should apply to the decisions it makes in the coming months.”

mlssoccer.com
 

EuroMode

Active Member
Modern slavery in Qatar World Cup

Dozens of Nepalese migrant labourers have died in Qatar in recent weeks and thousands more are enduring appalling labour abuses, raising serious questions about Qatar's preparations to host the 2022 World Cup.

This summer, Nepalese workers died at a rate of almost one a day in Qatar, many of them young men who had sudden heart attacks.

The investigation found evidence to suggest that thousands of Nepalese, who make up the single largest group of labourers in Qatar, face exploitation and abuses that amount to modern-day slavery, as defined by the International Labour Organization, during a building binge paving the way for 2022.

According to documents obtained from the Nepalese embassy in Doha, at least 44 workers died between 4 June and 8 August. More than half died of heart attacks, heart failure or workplace accidents.

The investigation also reveals
• Evidence of forced labour on a huge World Cup infrastructure project.

• Some Nepalese men have alleged that they have not been paid for months and have had their salaries retained to stop them running away.

• Some workers on other sites say employers routinely confiscate passports and refuse to issue ID cards, in effect reducing them to the status of illegal aliens.

• Some labourers say they have been denied access to free drinking water in the desert heat.

• About 30 Nepalese sought refuge at their embassy in Doha to escape the brutal conditions of their employment.

The allegations suggest a chain of exploitation leading from poor Nepalese villages to Qatari leaders. The overall picture is of one of the richest nations exploiting one of the poorest to get ready for the world's most popular sporting tournament.

The investigation also found men throughout the wider Qatari construction industry sleeping 12 to a room in places and getting sick through repulsive conditions in filthy hostels.

Some say they have been forced to work without pay and left begging for food.

Almost all migrant workers have huge debts from Nepal, accrued in order to pay recruitment agents for their jobs. The obligation to repay these debts, combined with the non-payment of wages, confiscation of documents and inability of workers to leave their place of work, constitute forced labour, a form of modern-day slavery estimated to affect up to 21 million people across the globe.

So entrenched is this exploitation that the Nepalese ambassador to Qatar, Maya Kumari Sharma, recently described the emirate as an "open jail".

source alalam
 

ecce homo

Well-Known Member
[h=1]Qatar 2022 World Cup organisers appalled by work conditions[/h]
BBC News

Qatar 2022 World Cup organisers say they are "appalled" by the findings of an investigation into the treatment of migrant workers in the country.
The organising body has also said that the Qatari government will be looking into The Guardian's allegations.
The newspaper says Nepalese workers in Qatar "face exploitation and abuses that amount to modern-day slavery".
"There is no excuse for any worker in Qatar, or anywhere else, to be treated in this manner," a statement read.
BBC Radio 5 live spoke to the chief executive of Qatar 2022, Hassan Al Thawadi, earlier in September before The Guardian's findings were published and asked him about this issue of working conditions.
He said: "Our priority when it comes to the workers is to ensure the safety, security, dignity and health of each worker is catered for and taken care of."
He added that work on World Cup projects had yet to get under way, but when it did contractors would have to abide by a "workers' charter".
"We've shared these workers' standards and our workers' strategy with Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International and we are in open discussions with them as well," he said.
 

ecce homo

Well-Known Member
Revealed: Qatar's World Cup 'slaves'

Exclusive: Abuse and exploitation of migrant workers preparing emirate for 2022

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/sep/25/revealed-qatars-world-cup-slaves


Dozens of Nepalese migrant labourers have died in Qatar in recent weeks and thousands more are enduring appalling labour abuses, a Guardian investigation has found, raising serious questions about Qatar's preparations to host the 2022 World Cup.
This summer, Nepalese workers died at a rate of almost one a day in Qatar, many of them young men who had sudden heart attacks. The investigation found evidence to suggest that thousands of Nepalese, who make up the single largest group of labourers in Qatar, face exploitation and abuses that amount to modern-day slavery, as defined by the International Labour Organisation, during a building binge paving the way for 2022.
According to documents obtained from the Nepalese embassy in Doha, at least 44 workers died between 4 June and 8 August. More than half died of heart attacks, heart failure or workplace accidents.
The investigation also reveals:
•Evidence of forced labour on a huge World Cup infrastructure project.
• Some Nepalese men have alleged that they have not been paid for months and have had their salaries retained to stop them running away.
• Some workers on other sites say employers routinely confiscate passports and refuse to issue ID cards, in effect reducing them to the status of illegal aliens.
• Some labourers say they have been denied access to free drinking water in the desert heat.
• About 30 Nepalese sought refuge at their embassy in Doha to escape the brutal conditions of their employment.
The allegations suggest a chain of exploitation leading from poor Nepalese villages to Qatari leaders. The overall picture is of one of the richest nations exploiting one of the poorest to get ready for the world's most popular sporting tournament.
"We'd like to leave, but the company won't let us," said one Nepalese migrant employed at Lusail City development, a $45bn (£28bn) city being built from scratch which will include the 90,000-seater stadium that will host the World Cup final. "I'm angry about how this company is treating us, but we're helpless. I regret coming here, but what to do? We were compelled to come just to make a living, but we've had no luck."
The body tasked with organising the World Cup, the Qatar 2022 Supreme Committee, told the Guardian that work had yet to begin on projects directly related to the World Cup. However, it said it was "deeply concerned with the allegations that have been made against certain contractors/sub-contractors working on Lusail City's construction site and considers this issue to be of the utmost seriousness". It added: "We have been informed that the relevant government authorities are conducting an investigation into the allegations."
The Guardian's investigation also found men throughout the wider Qatari construction industry sleeping 12 to a room in places and getting sick through repulsive conditions in filthy hostels. Some say they have been forced to work without pay and left begging for food.
"We were working on an empty stomach for 24 hours; 12 hours' work and then no food all night," said Ram Kumar Mahara, 27. "When I complained, my manager assaulted me, kicked me out of the labour camp I lived in and refused to pay me anything. I had to beg for food from other workers."
Almost all migrant workers have huge debts from Nepal, accrued in order to pay recruitment agents for their jobs. The obligation to repay these debts, combined with the non-payment of wages, confiscation of documents and inability of workers to leave their place of work, constitute forced labour, a form of modern-day slavery estimated to affect up to 21 million people across the globe. So entrenched is this exploitation that the Nepalese ambassador to Qatar, Maya Kumari Sharma, recently described the emirate as an "open jail".


Record of deaths in July 2013, from all causes, held by the Nepalese embassy in Doha. Photograph: /guardian.co.uk

"The evidence uncovered by the Guardian is clear proof of the use of systematic forced labour in Qatar," said Aidan McQuade, director of Anti-Slavery International, which was founded in 1839. "In fact, these working conditions and the astonishing number of deaths of vulnerable workers go beyond forced labour to the slavery of old where human beings were treated as objects. There is no longer a risk that the World Cup might be built on forced labour. It is already happening."
Qatar has the highest ratio of migrant workers to domestic population in the world: more than 90% of the workforce are immigrants and the country is expected to recruit up to 1.5 million more labourers to build the stadiums, roads, ports and hotels needed for the tournament. Nepalese account for about 40% of migrant labourers in Qatar. More than 100,000 Nepalese left for the emirate last year.
The murky system of recruitment brokers in Asia and labour contractors in Qatar leaves them vulnerable to exploitation. The supreme committee has insisted that decent labour standards will be set for all World Cup contracts, but underneath it a complex web of project managers, construction firms and labour suppliers, employment contractors and recruitment agents operate.
According to some estimates, Qatar will spend $100bn on infrastructure projects to support the World Cup. As well as nine state-of-the-art stadiums, the country has committed to $20bn worth of new roads, $4bn for a causeway connecting Qatar to Bahrain, $24bn for a high-speed rail network, and 55,000 hotel rooms to accommodate visiting fans and has almost completed a new airport.
The World Cup is part of an even bigger programme of construction in Qatar designed to remake the tiny desert kingdom over the next two decades. Qatar has yet to start building stadiums for 2022, but has embarked on the big infrastructure projects likesuch as Lusail City that, according to the US project managers, Parsons, "will play a major role during the 2022 Fifa World Cup". The British engineering company Halcrow, part of the CH2M Hill group, is a lead consultant on the Lusail project responsible for "infrastructure design and construction supervision". CH2M Hill was recently appointed the official programme management consultant to the supreme committee. It says it has a "zero tolerance policy for the use of forced labour and other human trafficking practices".
Halcrow said: "Our supervision role of specific construction packages ensures adherence to site contract regulation for health, safety and environment. The terms of employment of a contractor's labour force is not under our direct purview."
Some Nepalese working at Lusail City tell desperate stories. They are saddled with huge debts they are paying back at interest rates of up to 36%, yet say they are forced to work without pay.
"The company has kept two months' salary from each of us to stop us running away," said one man who gave his name as SBD and who works at the Lusail City marina. SBD said he was employed by a subcontractor that supplies labourers for the project. Some workers say their subcontrator has confiscated their passports and refused to issue the ID cards they are entitled to under Qatari law. "Our manager always promises he'll issue [our cards] 'next week'," added a scaffolder who said he had worked in Qatar for two years without being given an ID card.
Without official documentation, migrant workers are in effect reduced to the status of illegal aliens, often unable to leave their place of work without fear of arrest and not entitled to any legal protection. Under the state-run kafala sponsorship system, workers are also unable to change jobs or leave the country without their sponsor company's permission.
A third worker, who was equally reluctant to give his name for fear of reprisal, added: "We'd like to leave, but the company won't let us. If we run away, we become illegal and that makes it hard to find another job. The police could catch us at any time and send us back home. We can't get a resident permit if we leave."
Other workers said they were forced to work long hours in temperatures of up to 50C (122F) without access to drinking water.


Dalli Kahtri and her husband, Lil Man, hold photos of their sons, both of whom died while working as migrants in Malaysia and Qatar. Their younger son (foreground photo) died in Qatar from a heart attack, aged 20. Photograph: Peter Pattison/guardian.co.uk

The Qatari labour ministry said it had strict rules governing working in the heat, the provision of labour and the prompt payment of salaries.
"The ministry enforces this law through periodic inspections to ensure that workers have in fact received their wages in time. If a company does not comply with the law, the ministry applies penalties and refers the case to the judicial authorities."
Lusail Real Estate Company said: "Lusail City will not tolerate breaches of labour or health and safety law. We continually instruct our contractors and their subcontractors of our expectations and their contractual obligations to both us and individual employees. The Guardian have highlighted potentially illegal activities employed by one subcontractor. We take these allegations very seriously and have referred the allegations to the appropriate authorities for investigation. Based on this investigation, we will take appropriate action against any individual or company who has found to have broken the law or contract with us."
The workers' plight makes a mockery of concerns for the 2022 footballers.
"Everyone is talking about the effect of Qatar's extreme heat on a few hundred footballers," said Umesh Upadhyaya, general secretary of the General Federation of Nepalese Trade Unions. "But they are ignoring the hardships, blood and sweat of thousands of migrant workers, who will be building the World Cup stadiums in shifts that can last eight times the length of a football match."
 

ecce homo

Well-Known Member
Qatar migrant workers 'treated like animals' - Amnesty

BBC News

Qatar's construction sector is rife with abuse, Amnesty International (AI) has said in a report published as work begins on Fifa World Cup 2022 stadiums.

Amnesty says migrant workers are often subjected to non-payment of wages, dangerous working conditions and squalid accommodation.

The rights group said one manager had referred to workers as "animals".

Qatari officials have said conditions will be suitable for those involved in construction of World Cup facilities.

It has not yet commented on the latest report.

Amnesty said it conducted interviews with 210 workers, employers and government officials for its report, The Dark Side of Migration: Spotlight on Qatar's construction sector ahead of the World Cup.

The report includes testimony from Nepalese workers employed by a company delivering supplies to a construction project associated with the planned Fifa headquarters.

The workers said they were "treated like cattle", working up to 12 hours a day, seven days a week, including during Qatar's hot summer months.

Disabilities

Amnesty said some of the abuses amounted to "forced labour".

Some migrant workers were threatened with penalty fines, deportation or loss of income if they did not show up to work even though they were not being paid, Amnesty said.

More than 1,000 people were admitted to the trauma unit at Doha's main hospital in 2012 having fallen from height at work, Amnesty said, citing an unnamed hospital representative.

Some 10% were disabled as a result and the mortality rate was "significant", AI said.

"It is simply inexcusable in one of the richest countries in the world, that so many migrant workers are being ruthlessly exploited, deprived of their pay and left struggling to survive," said Salil Shetty, Amnesty's secretary general.

"Our findings indicate an alarming level of exploitation.

"Fifa has a duty to send a strong public message that it will not tolerate human rights abuses on construction projects related to the World Cup."

It follows a report by the UK's Guardian newspaper in September, which likened workers' conditions to "modern-day slavery".

The Guardian investigation drew a strong response from the world professional footballers' association Fifpro, which collaborates with the Uni Global Union, the voice of 20 million service sector workers.

Qatar must protect the rights of the workers who are to deliver the 2022 World Cup, it said.

FifPro board member Brendan Schwab said it was "inexcusable for workers' lives to be sacrificed, especially given modern health and safety practices in the construction industry".
 

ecce homo

Well-Known Member
Nepal's World Cup trail brings misery

BBC News

If it wasn't for a game of football there would never be a link between Mandu and Doha.

A bigger divide is hard to imagine than between this isolated hamlet clinging to the Himalayan foothills and the ambitious steel and glass spires of that desert capital.

Yet when Rajendra Sharma set off for a job in Qatar building its World Cup airport he was following a well-trodden path, taken by hundreds of Nepalis every day.

The way his journey ended was all too common as well: this summer his wife Manju got a message to say he had died from a heart attack, one of scores of South Asian migrant workers who have perished helping the tiny Gulf nation transform itself for the football championship.

Rajendra was just 29 years old.

Heat

"He was healthy when he left," his wife says, breaking into tears as she shows me a photo of the couple together.

To get the job, a medical certificate was mandatory. If he had been ill, she says, "the doctor would have sent him back".

But soon after arriving in Qatar, she remembers him complaining about the "rotten food" and "long working hours in the heat" - a common complaint among Nepalis, Indians and others working on construction projects there, where summer temperatures regularly break through 50C.

His contract said he was supposed to work 48 hours a week. That's long by Western standards, but Manju says her husband would often work even longer periods at a stretch.

Again, this matches the accounts of other migrant labourers on World Cup projects.

Her neighbour, Bir Bahadur Dong, also worked in Qatar on the new airport, but returned home when his contract ended. He says he would never go back after experiencing similar conditions.

"We'd often get ill and then have to spend our salary on medical treatment," Dong says.

"Instead of dying in Qatar, better to die here in Nepal."

New future?

Exploitative working conditions, Manju believes, are what killed her husband. But she will probably never know for sure.

His death certificate from the Qatari authorities records the cause simply as "sudden cardiac arrest".

He had only been in Qatar for nine months when he died - for a job they hoped would mean a new future for their three-year-old daughter Bimita.

Rajendra was sending back around 25,000 Nepalese rupees every three months.

That's barely $80 (£50) a month, but in Mandu that sum went a long way. Everyone here lives off the land - there is no other work.

But now the family's prospects look even dimmer.

When we first arrive in the village, a one-hour climb from the nearest road, Manju is pounding ears of millet with a heavy, wooden pole.

Bimita looks on, along with her late father's elderly parents.

Yet, despite the horror stories coming from Qatar, Nepalis keep going there.

The government's foreign employment office in Kathmandu - where all would-be migrant workers have to go to sort out their papers - is overwhelmed every day.

Up to 10,000 people press through its rickety metal gates each week, and many are heading to Qatar.

"I have no alternative if I want to feed my children and get them educated," says a mason who had worked in Qatar before.

"There is no work here."

Across the country, young men are leaving their towns and villages, which have become "a home for the elderly", according to Kathmandu-based analyst Nischal Pandey.

With a GDP per capita of less than $700, Nepal is one of the poorest countries in the world.

It relies on the remittances of workers abroad and tourist dollars to keep it afloat.

On the same measure, Qatar is the world's richest country - with a GDP per capita more than 140 times greater.

Critics say it could afford to provide much better wages and conditions to the workers it relies on to make up for its lack of people.

'Open jail'

Nepal's government insists it is "raising its voice" for its workers abroad.

"Qatar should respect their rights set out by the International Labour Organization," says Buddhi Bahadur Khadkha, the spokesman for the labour ministry.

But when Nepal's previous ambassador to Qatar spoke out about conditions there, calling it "an open jail", she was sacked.

Manju pauses for breath in between threshing the millet.

"I don't have any education - I can't get a job. I don't know what I am going to do," she says.

"I wish I'd never heard of this place Qatar."
 

EuroMode

Active Member
The Accidental Vagina: Design for Qatar’s first 2022 World Cup stadium released

qatar.png

As the design for the first of a series of new stadiums built for the Qatar hosted tournament is released, talk has moved on from the heat...



Before now, the majority of discussions surrounding Qatar’s successful bid to host the 2022 World Cup have been surrounding the heat. There’s even been talk of switching the summer tournament to winter months.

However, now that a virtual rendering of the first new purpose-built stadium has been released, the debate is not about whether the fully air conditioned pitch will solve the heat problem.

Rather a number of commentators and tweeters have pointed to the fact that the proposed Al-Wakrah stadium looks very much like a vagina.

Yes, the conservative country has designed what many believe appears to be a giant ode to women’s private parts.

This is not what the architects intended. Instead, the design is supposed to resemble the sails of a dhow boat which is traditionally used for pearl fishing by Qataris.

Aecom, the firm that won the Al Wakrah contract along with Zaha Hadid Architects said: “Inspired by the dhow boat that carried generations of local fishermen and pearl divers, the stadium weaves together Qatar's past with its progressive vision for the future.

“Sustainable materials and practices will be used throughout the stadium and the pitch and spectator stands will be cooled to a perfect temperature for football.”

Hassan al-Thawadi, the general secretary of Qatar’s 2022 committee said: “Al-Wakrah is the first of six stadiums already in the latter stages of the design process, our committee has issued 10 major tenders to the market encompassing project and design managers and stadium-operation consultants.”

The stadium, with a capacity of 40,000 people, would be completed by 2018, he said, but declined to comment on the cost.

As well as discussions surrounding the heat, Qatar as also been hit by allegations of migrant construction worker exploitation, as well as accusations of corruption over the voting procedure to win the bid, both of which officials have denied.

You can judge whether the stadium bears a closer resemblance to sails or a vagina’s labia by watching a video of the design here:


source independent
 
Last edited by a moderator:

EuroMode

Active Member
Qatar World Cup: 400 Nepalese have died since construction began





More than 400 Nepalese migrant workers have died on Qatar's World Cup building sites as the Gulf state prepares to host the event in 2022, a report will reveal this week.

The grim statistic comes from the Pravasi Nepali Co-ordination Committee, a respected human rights organisation which compiles lists of the dead using official sources in Doha. It will pile new pressure on the Qatari authorities – and on football's world governing body, Fifa – to curb a mounting death toll that some are warning could hit 4,000 by the time the 2022 finals take place.

It also raises the question of how many migrant workers in total have died on construction sites since Qatar won the bid in 2010. Nepalese workers comprise 20% of Qatar's migrant workforce, and many others are drafted in from countries such as India, Bangladesh, Pakistan and Sri Lanka.

A focus on the Nepalese deaths has seen Fifa and Qatar battling a PR crisis that threatens to cast a long shadow over the event. Last week, appearing before EU officials, Theo Zwanziger, a senior Fifa executive who has publicly criticised the decision to award the tournament to Qatar, pledged that his organisation would be carrying out "on-the-spot visits" to ensure that workers' rights were being respected.

But the promise is unlikely to reassure human rights organisations and labour groups, which have raised repeated concerns about Qatar's kafala employment system, under which migrant workers are tied to their "sponsor" employers.

Qatar's World Cup authorities recently issued detailed guidelines that they hope will address concerns about their employment laws. The 50-page report, Workers' Welfare Standards, provides a breakdown of the guidelines that 2022 organisers expect contractors and sub-contractors to observe. But this has not stopped the death toll rising, nor continuing international criticism.

Jim Murphy, Labour's shadow international development minister,, who is expected to visit Qatar soon, raised the issue again this week. Writing in the Guardian, Murphy said: "People don't have to die to bring us this or any other World Cup or sporting event; not a single worker died building the sites for the London 2012 Olympics. According to the International TUC, the 2022 World Cup risks 4,000 lives."

The continued criticism will prove embarrassing for Qatar as it prepares for a visit from Prince Charles.

The symbolic total of 400 deaths, which the Observer understands will be confirmed in the next few days, will also invite questions not only about working conditions on sites but also about the treatment of construction workers.

The Observer has learned of the horrific case of Noka Bir Moktan, a 23-year-old who was said to have died of "sudden cardiac arrest" in October 2013, although photos of his corpse show he suffered a collapsed chest, apparently consistent with ill-treatment.

Moktan's family come from a poor village in Nepal's remote hill district of Ilam. His elderly father borrowed 175,000 rupees (about £1,000) to pay for his passage and agency fees to Qatar, in the hope that he would be able to send some of his earnings home. The money, was borrowed from a loan shark and was supposed to be reimbursed by Moktan's Qatari employer, but this did not happen. The family now fear that the loan shark will demand that Moktan's two sisters, aged 14 and 16, who were collateral for the loan, be sent to work in brothels in Mumbai to pay off the debt.

Moktan's tragic case is far from untypical. Last November, Amnesty International issued a report warning that many workers were complaining about poor health and safety standards, including some who said they were not issued with helmets on sites. A representative of Doha's main hospital stated that more than 1,000 people were admitted to its trauma unit in 2012 having fallen from heights at work.

Researchers also found migrant workers living in squalid, overcrowded accommodation with no air-conditioning and overflowing sewage. Several camps lacked power and researchers found one large group of men living without running water.

"It is simply inexcusable in one of the richest countries in the world that so many migrant workers are being ruthlessly exploited, deprived of their pay and left struggling to survive," Salil Shetty, secretary general of Amnesty International, said at the time the report was published.

Some have gone as far as to call for Qatar to lose its right to host the tournament. But Zwanziger said such a move would be "counterproductive". He told the European parliament sub-committee on human rights that "it would simply mean that the spotlight would be put away from them".


source Guardian
 

ecce homo

Well-Known Member
Indian worker death rate in Qatar 'normal'

BBC News

Indian and Qatari officials have insisted the death rate among Indian workers in the 2022 World Cup host nation is not abnormal.

The Indian embassy in Doha revealed on Monday that 455 Indians had died in 2012 and 2013, prompting concerns from labour organisations.

But a spokesman for the Indian foreign ministry said the "overwhelming number" of deaths were due to natural causes.

The emirate has been under pressure to improve conditions for migrant workers.

'Horrendous'

Following a freedom of information request by the AFP news agency, the embassy published figures showing that 237 Indian workers had died in Qatar in 2012 and 218 in the first 11 months of 2013. On average, about 20 died per month, peaking at 27 in August.

The International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC) said the data showed "an exceptionally high mortality rate", while Human Rights Watch researcher Nicholas McGeehan said the figures were "horrendous" and gave "an indication of an unfolding tragedy in Qatar".

But the head of Qatar's National Human Rights Committee, which is close to the government, insisted there was nothing untoward given that there were about 500,000 Indians living in the emirate.

"Indians make up the largest community in Qatar... twice the number of Qatari nationals," Ali Bin Sumaikh al-Marri told AFP on Wednesday.

"If we look at the numbers of Qataris who died... of natural causes... over the past two years, we see that numbers of deaths among the Indian community are normal."

He also urged the embassy to provide details on the circumstances of the deaths, claiming that there was a "campaign against Qatar".

A spokesman for the Indian Ministry of External Affairs, Syed Akbaruddin, told the BBC that India had "a large, diverse and well regarded community in Qatar".

He added: "Figures for the number of Indian deaths in the last five years remain consistent. These are not in any way attributable to any one cause or the other."

But Mr McGeehan told al-Jazeera that it was not helpful to dismiss them as normal and claim their publication was part of a campaign against Qatar when the country had a poor safety record.

Last month, AFP reported that 191 Nepalese workers had died in Qatar in 2013, many of them from "unnatural" heart failure, taking the total to at least 360 over two years.

The World Cup organisers subsequently published a "workers' charter", in response to a call from football world governing body Fifa for Qatar's working practices to be revised.

But the ITUC said it did not go far enough, while Amnesty International has called for the organising committee to provide more information about how it will enforce standards.

In November, Amnesty published a report on Qatar's construction sector that documented a range of abuses against migrant workers, including "non-payment of wages, harsh and dangerous working conditions, and shocking standards of accommodation".
 

ecce homo

Well-Known Member
Qatar 2022: Plans to protect World Cup workers unveiled

BBC News

Organisers of the 2022 World Cup in Qatar have published a 'Workers' Charter' in an attempt to protect the rights of migrant employees.

Almost 200 Nepalese men are reported to have died last year working on construction projects in Qatar.

The new 50-page document has been developed in conjunction with the International Labour Organisation.

However the International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC) says its proposals do not go far enough.

Qatar had until 12 February to inform football's world governing body, Fifa, how it would reform working practices.

Fifa had been pushing the 2022 World Cup hosts for reform following criticism of the Gulf state's conditions for migrant workers.

As well as 185 deaths last year, it is believed a significant number of workers in Qatar suffered injuries as a result of unsafe working practices.

There have also been complaints about the standard of accommodation many workers live in.

Trade unions and human rights groups have also criticised Qatar's 'kefala' employment system that ties migrant workers to their sponsor companies and the exit visa requirements that prevent workers from leaving without the permission of employers.

The new document, entitled 'Workers' Welfare Standards', details the measures that Qatar's World Cup Supreme Committee plan to enact when dealing with contractors and subcontractors over key World Cup stadium and infrastructure projects.

The supreme committee said its principles will be "robustly and effectively monitored and enforced for the benefit of all workers".

Among its actions, the charter will force employers to:

•Install a telephone hotline for workers to raise grievances and report concerns
•Grant workers a minimum of three weeks' paid annual holiday based on a 48-hour week that cannot exceed eight hours per day
•Guarantee workers a rest day or compensate them; and create welfare officer posts as well as a forum for grievances to be resolved.
However the ITUC, which claims up to 4,000 workers could die by 2022 if current laws and attitudes persist, has criticised the new charter as "a sham" that will not protect workers' rights.

General secretary Sharan Burrow added: "These standards are built on an old, discredited self-monitoring system which has failed in the past in Bangladesh and other countries where thousands of workers have died."

Last year Qatar issued 10 guiding principles that form the backbone of the new 50-page charter:

•Health and Safety - foster and actively encourage a world-class health and safety culture
•Employment Standards - comply with the Supreme Committee's required employment standards and all relevant Qatari laws
•Equality - treat all workers equally and fairly, irrespective of their origin, nationality, ethnicity, gender or religion
•Dignity - ensure that workers' dignity is protected and preserved throughout their employment and repatriation
•Unlawful Practices - prohibit child labour, forced labour, and human trafficking practices
•Working and Living Conditions - create and maintain safe and healthy working and living conditions
•Wages - ensure that wages are paid to workers on time
•Grievances - prohibit retaliation against workers who exercise any rights deriving from the Supreme Committee's required employment standards or relevant Qatari laws
•Access to Information - provide access to accurate information in the appropriate language regarding workers' rights deriving from the Supreme Committee's required employment standards or relevant Qatari laws
•Training - provide workers with training on skills necessary to carry out their tasks, including areas related to health and safety.
Hassan Al-Thawadi, the secretary general of Qatar's supreme committee for the World Cup, has insisted the tournament would not be built "on the blood of innocents".

After clarifying in October that Qatar would still host the World Cup, Fifa president Sepp Blatter promised to address the issue of workers' rights and visited the Emir of Qatar to discuss the matter.

Zahir Belounis, the French Algerian striker who was unable to leave Qatar after a dispute with his club, is due to address the European Parliament on Friday about his experience.

A senior member of Fifa's executive committee, Theo Zwanziger, is also expected to deliver an update on Qatar's planned reforms at the hearing in Brussels.

Qatar is reported to be spending more than $200bn (£121bn) on a series of infrastructure projects, and says the World Cup is a catalyst for a nationwide building project.
 

ecce homo

Well-Known Member
Amnesty seeks 'more detail' on Indian deaths in Qatar

BBC News

Human rights group Amnesty International has urged India to give "more transparent information" about the deaths of Indian workers in Qatar, the host nation for the 2022 World Cup.

India revealed on Monday that 455 Indians had died in 2012 and 2013, prompting concerns from labour groups.

It said the "overwhelming number" of deaths were due to natural causes.

Indian and Qatari officials insist there is nothing abnormal about the death rate given the population there.

About 500,000 Indians live in Qatar and India's external affairs ministry said the "figures for the number of Indian deaths in the last five years remain consistent" and are not "in any way attributable to any one cause or the other".

Nevertheless Amnesty International said the government should provide more details about the deaths.

'Serious labour abuses'

"Instead of simply saying that such deaths are normal, the Indian government should provide clearer and more transparent information," Nikhil Eapen, spokesperson, Amnesty International India, said in a statement.

He said that concern arose because cause of death was unclear.

"What we need to know is who these people were - how old they were and what work they were doing - and how they died."

Mr Eapan said the Indian government should "work urgently with the Qatari government and other governments across the Gulf to address the serious labour abuses experienced by Indian migrant workers".

Following a freedom of information request by the AFP news agency, the Indian embassy in Doha published figures showing that 237 Indian workers had died in Qatar in 2012 and 218 in the first 11 months of 2013. On average, about 20 died per month, peaking at 27 in August.

The International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC) said the data showed "an exceptionally high mortality rate".

The emirate has been under pressure to improve conditions for migrant workers.

Last month, AFP reported that 191 Nepalese workers had died in Qatar in 2013, many of them from "unnatural" heart failure, taking the total to at least 360 over two years.

The World Cup organisers subsequently published a "workers' charter", in response to a call from football world governing body Fifa for Qatar's working practices to be revised.
 

ecce homo

Well-Known Member
Qatar World Cup 2022 investigation: former Fifa vice-president Jack Warner and family paid millions

Documents appear to show a senior Fifa official and his family were paid millions by a company controlled by a former Qatari football official shortly after the country won its bid for the 2022 World Cup

http://t.co/bSykmupvt7

A senior Fifa official and his family were paid almost $2 million (£1.2m) from a Qatari firm linked to the country’s successful bid for the 2022 World Cup, The Telegraph can disclose.

Jack Warner, the former vice-president of Fifa, appears to have been personally paid $1.2 million (£720,000) from a company controlled by a former Qatari football official shortly after the decision to award the country the tournament.

Payments totalling almost $750,000 (£450,000) were made to Mr Warner’s sons, documents show. A further $400,000 (£240,000) was paid to one of his employees.

It is understood that the FBI is now investigating Trinidad-based Mr Warner and his alleged links to the Qatari bid, and that the former Fifa official’s eldest son, who lives in Miami, has been helping the inquiry as a co-operating witness.

The awarding of the 2022 World Cup to Qatar was one of the most controversial decisions in sporting history. The intense summer heat in the desert nation has raised the prospect of the tournament being moved to the winter for the first time.

Although Qatar has repeatedly denied wrongdoing during the bidding process, it has long been suspected that the decision was flawed, and several members of the Fifa committee have faced corruption allegations.

It can be disclosed that a company owned by Mohamed Bin Hammam, the Fifa executive member for Qatar, appeared to pay $1.2 million (£720,000) to Mr Warner in 2011.

A note from one of Mr Warner’s companies, Jamad, to Mr Bin Hammam’s firm, Kemco, requested $1.2 million in payment for work carried out between 2005 and 2010.

The document is dated December 15, 2010, two weeks after Qatar won the right to host the tournament, and states that the money is “payable to Jack Warner”.

Mr Warner’s two sons and an employee were paid a further $1 million (£600,000) by the same Qatari company.

One document states that payments are to “offset legal and other expenses”, but a separate letter claims that more than $1 million cover “professional services provided over the period 2005-2010”.

At least one bank in the Cayman Islands initially refused to process the payment amid fears over the legality of the money transfer. The money was eventually processed via a bank in New York – a transaction that is understood to have come to the attention of the FBI. A well-placed source said: “These payments need to be properly investigated. The World Cup is the most important event in football and we need to be confident that decisions have been made for the right reasons. There are lots of questions that still need to be answered.”

Mr Warner was one of the most experienced members of the executive committee until he stood down in 2011 and served as vice-president of the organisation for 14 years. He was one of the 22 people who decided to award Russia the 2018 World Cup and Qatar the 2022 tournament. It is understood that the FBI is investigating payments to Mr Warner and that one of his family members has been acting as a “co-operating witness”.

The investigators are thought to be focusing on Mr Warner’s American and Grand Cayman accounts.

Michael Garcia, the joint chief investigator of Fifa’s ethics committee, is also investigating irregularities surrounding the bidding process. He is expected to deliver his report to the committee later this year.

The disclosures will add to concerns that some Fifa executive committee members were not impartial when they cast their votes in December 2010. England suffered a humiliating defeat when it secured only two votes to host the 2018 World Cup and was eliminated after the first round.

Even before the decision was made, there were persistent allegations of corruption. Six weeks before the vote in Zurich, a World Cup official was caught in an undercover investigation agreeing to sell his vote to one of England’s rivals. A second member of the same committee was recorded asking for £1.5 million for a sports academy. Both officials were suspended, meaning that 22 people voted instead of the usual 24.

A whistleblower also claimed that one of the bidders had bought the votes of three African executive committee members. The former Fifa employee later withdrew the allegations.

Following England’s defeat, a parliamentary committee held an inquiry into the failed bid. Lord Triesman, the bid’s former chairman, gave evidence stating that four Fifa executive committee members had asked for business deals and favours when negotiating their support. One of those he named was Mr Warner.

The Labour peer said that the then Fifa vice-president had asked for money to build an education centre in Trinidad, with the cash to be channelled through him, and £500,000 to buy World Cup television rights for Haiti.

In June 2011, Mr Warner resigned from all football posts after he was accused of facilitating bribes to members of the Caribbean football union on behalf of Mohamed Bin Hammam, who was standing against Sepp Blatter to be Fifa president. A report by the Fifa ethics committee found that there was “compelling” evidence that Mr Warner was “an accessory to corruption”.

Mr Warner was caught on tape apparently urging fellow Fifa officials to accept cash gifts from Mr Bin Hammam, the disgraced former presidential candidate.

The documents seen by The Telegraph raise further questions about Mr Warner’s activities. One email, which appears to have been sent by one of Mr Warner’s employees, shows that the staff member personally received $412,000 from the Qatari company and that Mr Warner’s son, Daryll, was paid $432,000. Daryan, his other son, was paid $316,000 via a company called We Buy Houses.

Regarding the payments to Daryan, the email states that he was “contracted … based on his understanding, contacts and history with the regional players who make up an integral part of the defence team … pursuant to Fifa bribery allegations. As stated in our letter of June 11, 2011, the value of US $316,000, and this is an initial deposit to offset legal and other expenses related to the matter.”

In July, a different email shows that “monies in the amount of $1.2 million” were wire transferred to J&D International, another of Mr Warner’s companies, by the same Qatari firm. It states that this is to “offset legal and other related expenses associated with regard to an ongoing matter”.

Mr Warner and his family declined to comment. A spokesman for Qatar’s 2022 World Cup organising committee said: “The 2022 bid committee strictly adhered to Fifa’s bidding regulations in compliance with their code of ethics.

“The supreme committee for delivery and legacy and the individuals involved in the 2022 bid committee are unaware of any allegations surrounding business dealings between private individuals.”
 

ecce homo

Well-Known Member
Sepp Blatter: "le choix du Qatar pour le Mondial 2022, une erreur"


Attribuer la Coupe du Monde 2022 au Qatar était peut-être une erreur, a confié le patron de la FIFA Sepp Blatter à la RTS. Le Valaisan a fait état de pressions de la part de la France et de l'Allemagne.

Invité du 19h30 jeudi, à moins d'un mois de la Coupe du Monde au Brésil, le président de la Fédération internationale de football (FIFA) Sepp Blatter est revenu sur l'attribution du Mondial 2022 au Qatar. Le Valaisan semble juger que ce choix a été "une erreur" et pointe la responsabilité sur la pression politique de la France et de l'Allemagne.

Evoquant un rendez-vous où Nicolas Sarkozy avait convié l'émir du Qatar en même temps que Michel Platini à un repas à l'Elysée, Sepp Blatter commente: "On n'imagine pas le président suisse faire cela".

Le Mondial 2022 probablement en hiver


Concernant le déplacement du Mondial au Qatar en hiver, en raison des grandes chaleurs de l'été, il estime maintenant le fait "probable".

Par ailleurs, à moins d'un mois de la Coupe du Monde au Brésil, Sepp Blatter estime que les Brésiliens se laisseront entraîner par la fièvre du foot "dès que le premier coup de ballon sera donné au match d'ouverture".

"J'ai la volonté de continuer à la tête de la FIFA"

Le patron de la FIFA, qui est âgé de 78 ans, est candidat à sa succession en 2015. Il l'explique ainsi: "Je n'ai pas seulement l'envie, j'ai la volonté de continuer."

Sepp Blatter dit également écarter la possibilité que Michel Platini, qui fut naguère son "poulain", se présente contre lui: "Il ne le fera pas."

RTSinfo, boi
 

The Bidenator

Legendary Member
Orange Room Supporter
I pity the players who will have to endure the searing heat of the desert.. unless Qatar actually builds indoor stadiums with air conditioning, which sounds awfully expensive and wasteful.
 

Mozz

Well-Known Member
I pity the players who will have to endure the searing heat of the desert.. unless Qatar actually builds indoor stadiums with air conditioning, which sounds awfully expensive and wasteful.

expensive and wasteful....

This should be the MOTO of Gulf countries.

I have never in my life seen anything in the Gulf that wasnt expensive, wasteful and over exaggerated
 

NMA

Well-Known Member
I pity the players who will have to endure the searing heat of the desert.. unless Qatar actually builds indoor stadiums with air conditioning, which sounds awfully expensive and wasteful.

Give me half their salaries and i'd play in the desert for 5 hours wearing ski suits.
 

EuroMode

Active Member
World Cup - 'Plot to buy World Cup': New Qatar bribery claims

FIFA are facing fresh calls to strip Qatar of the 2022 World Cup after allegations of bribery, branded the 'Plot to buy the World Cup'.



The Sunday Times revealed this morning that they have received millions of secret documents including emails, letters and bank transfers, which the paper alleges are proof that Qatari football official Mohamed Bin Hammam made payments totalling €3.6m to football officials in return for their support for the bid to host the tournament.

It is alleged that the 65-year-old was lobbying other football officials on his country’s behalf at least a year before the announcement came in December 2010.

The Sunday Times claims that they have gathered emails that show Bin Hamman paid FIFA delegates in Africa to buy their support for the World Cup.

Although the vast majority of the officials did not have a vote, they allege Bin Hammam's strategy was to “win a groundswell of support for the Qatari bid which would then influence the four African FIFA executive committee members who were able to take part in the election.”

Qatar strongly deny any wrongdoing and have insisted that Bin Hamman never had any official role in the bid for the 2022 World Cup.

FIFA President Sepp Blatter has previously admitted that giving the World Cup to the Middle Eastern state was a 'mistake', due to the exhausting summer heat.

source yahoo sport
 
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