Religious symbolism to human and animal anatomy

ܐܵܠܘܼܟ̰ܵܐ

ܐܵܠܘܼܟ̰ܵܐ

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Djed.

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Ankh A bull's thoracic vertebrae.

Ankh is also believed to might have been other things (fallopian tube,, genitals joined together, etc). But this makes more sense and goes in context with other Ancient Egyptian symbolism to cow/bull bone anatomy.

Kaaba blackstone is a vagina.

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Hindu Phallic Linga for penis.

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  • Saqar18

    Saqar18

    New Member
    Djed.

    View attachment 19465View attachment 19466





    View attachment 19468View attachment 19469

    Ankh A bull's thoracic vertebrae.

    Ankh is also believed to might have been other things (fallopian tube,, genitals joined together, etc). But this makes more sense and goes in context with other Ancient Egyptian symbolism to cow/bull bone anatomy.

    Kaaba blackstone is a vagina.

    View attachment 19470


    Hindu Phallic Linga for penis.

    View attachment 19474 View attachment 19475
    Bruh😂😂
     
    Orangina

    Orangina

    Legendary Member
    Djed.

    View attachment 19465View attachment 19466





    View attachment 19468View attachment 19469

    Ankh A bull's thoracic vertebrae.

    Ankh is also believed to might have been other things (fallopian tube,, genitals joined together, etc). But this makes more sense and goes in context with other Ancient Egyptian symbolism to cow/bull bone anatomy.

    Kaaba blackstone is a vagina.

    View attachment 19470


    Hindu Phallic Linga for penis.

    View attachment 19474 View attachment 19475
    where did you find all these information?

    Can you provide any source?
    as for mr joseph bou fadel ...no sources needed lol
     
    ܐܵܠܘܼܟ̰ܵܐ

    ܐܵܠܘܼܟ̰ܵܐ

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    where did you find all these information?

    Can you provide any source?
    as for mr joseph bou fadel ...no sources needed lol
    For the Ancient Egyptian symbols, The Quick and the Dead: Biomedical Theory in Ancient Egypt. P.104, 127-129

    For the Kaaba and Shiva Lingam, it's not found in academic works. I make that reference along Hindu and atheist individuals online. It's also mentioned in "The God Parasite: Revelation of Neuroscience".
     
    fidelio

    fidelio

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    Regardless of the degree of similarity between these artifacts and their biological counterpart which i find to be exaggerated, but humans have always copied the shapes and forms they see in nature. Sometimes going about it too literally, and at some points looking for the recurrent natural proportions like the fibonacci or the golden ratio. I can provide you with better similarities later in this thread if i manage not to lose any interest.

    However, the imitation of nature can in times have an inherent meaning behind it and that is an extremely complex study in semiotics that can prove futile with the lack of historical record.

    For example; a cat on a woman's leg in a renaissance painting, has a different meaning than a cat on top of a tree painted by the same artist. There are historical and social rules that writers have perpetuated ever since the 16th century that help us understand and decrypt these works of art.
    In contrast, the academic world has little to no chance of ever proving beyond any reasonable doubt why the Great Sphinx is a man's head on a feline body and what that represented in its original context. All for lack of proper historical record.
     
    Orangina

    Orangina

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    Regardless of the degree of similarity between these artifacts and their biological counterpart which i find to be exaggerated, but humans have always copied the shapes and forms they see in nature. Sometimes going about it too literally, and at some points looking for the recurrent natural proportions like the fibonacci or the golden ratio. I can provide you with better similarities later in this thread if i manage not to lose any interest.

    However, the imitation of nature can in times have an inherent meaning behind it and that is an extremely complex study in semiotics that can prove futile with the lack of historical record.

    For example; a cat on a woman's leg in a renaissance painting, has a different meaning than a cat on top of a tree painted by the same artist. There are historical and social rules that writers have perpetuated ever since the 16th century that help us understand and decrypt these works of art.
    In contrast, the academic world has little to no chance of ever proving beyond any reasonable doubt why the Great Sphinx is a man's head on a feline body and what that represented in its original context. All for lack of proper historical record.
    Now this caught my attention....really interesting....what is the meaning of a cat on a woman's leg?

    I have read recently an article about how some blind people are able to echo locate like bats


    Ok this might be out of subject, but I mean it is very normal that people look at what nature provide and imitate it right?
     
    ܐܵܠܘܼܟ̰ܵܐ

    ܐܵܠܘܼܟ̰ܵܐ

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    The Egyptian Gods were first depicted as animals. And then as human-like bodies with animal heads (when the religion got more human-centralized). I don't think that is any mystery. Egyptians believed in the appearance of their Gods within a mascot animal which they would worship.

    To ancient religions, the concept of a "God" you worship without any material manefestation was absurd. It was like attending a wedding without the bride present.
     
    fidelio

    fidelio

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    Now this caught my attention....really interesting....what is the meaning of a cat on a woman's leg?
    Well, it has quite the colorful meanings, albeit revolving around the same precept that the woman is سيئة السمعة .
    Now if the cat has a raised tail, it means that woman is also in heat. The renaissance people, although not pudic in representation, were imaginative enough to be even more specific. And that's one of the many uses of symbolism.

    I have read recently an article about how some blind people are able to echo locate like bats


    Ok this might be out of subject, but I mean it is very normal that people look at what nature provide and imitate it right?
    Of course it is. We are after all part of nature itself and "created in its image" (?)
     
    ܐܵܠܘܼܟ̰ܵܐ

    ܐܵܠܘܼܟ̰ܵܐ

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    I don't think those similarities are exaggerated. But rather direct.

    Ancient societies were centered around direct symbolism to physical objects and animals.

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    ܐܵܠܘܼܟ̰ܵܐ

    ܐܵܠܘܼܟ̰ܵܐ

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    Direct representation, indirect symbolism. Nuance.
    You wouldn't expect a lot of abstraction in caveman drawings... Where it feels abstract, is where it came short. I imagine ancient drawings to carry more realism than drawings in the renaissance.
     
    fidelio

    fidelio

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    You wouldn't expect a lot of abstraction in caveman drawings... Where it feels abstract, is where it came short. I imagine ancient drawings to carry more realism than drawings in the renaissance.
    Look i will give you another example since you mentioned prehistoric attempts of representation, which i think will make the distinction clearer.
    in the Lascaux caves, where an abundance of drawings was found, scattered along dozens of generations (let the time scale set in for a moment), one of the examples is hand prints overlayed during many sessions and over many years:



    Now this is plaeolithic, so the brain at that time was starting to think outside the box of hunter-gatherer and into the realm of the, let's say the imperceptible. There are a number of explanations as to why would these people find the urge to leave their mark in such a fashion. It was applied by either using the palm as a stencil and covering the wall around it with soot and pigment, or simply dabbing the hand into the pigments and plastering it on the wall; much like what a child would do when discovering coloring for the first time. A hand print.
    Of course there's no historical record from the time, but it is quite instinctive to infer that these people actually knew the shape of their own hands are different and that was a sign of a personal identity. An identity they wanted to keep for generations to come after they had departed in an effort to register their selves on the timeline of their tribe.

    It's not a painting of a bison or a hunter with a spear, it's a hand print that requires no skill and little to no time to leave, that can convey a seemingly modest dose of symbolism. We imitate nature for a reason, and the reason is much more important that the imitated.
     
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